Music by David Pannell

 

Free downloads of MP3 files of my own music

My favourite music and recommendations here
(other people's music)

Oligopoly

A slowly growing collection of cover versions recorded entirely with voices. Recorded 2011-2012.

Economy

A slowly growing collection of cover versions recorded simply with vocals and acoustic instruments only. Recorded 2011-2013.

 

Option Value

A collection of original rock songs. Recorded 1998-2001.

Conference

Songs performed at academic conferences: CEED in December 2015 and the Agricultural Economics Society in April 2013.

My favourite music and recommendations here (other people's music)

 

 

Option Value

A collection of original rock songs. Recorded 1998-2001.

To download, right click on song name and select "Save Target As ..." (Internet Explorer) or "Save Link As ..." (Firefox/Google Chrome).

Common sense (4:43, 4.6MB)

Cunning brew (3:07, 3.1MB)

We make it up as we go along (3:08, 3.2MB)

Commonplace (4:13, 4.1MB)

My wish (3:19, 4.1MB)

I can't forget (4:20, 4.3MB)

Once a man, always a man (1:38, 1.8MB)

Helpless grace (4:39, 4.5MB)

The human condition (3:29, 3.5MB)

Lyrical death (3:20, 3.3MB)

So simple (2:12, 2.3MB)

Hungry (2:54, 2.9MB)

On the seventh day (3:37, 3.6MB)

These are the songs I recorded after buying a computer-based multitrack recording system in 1998. Some of them are old songs that I wrote to play with my band, The Bargains, in the early 1980s (Cunning Brew, The Human Condition, Lyrical Death, Hungry and On the Seventh Day). The rest were newly written in 1998-2001. 

Cover CD inserts (pdf file)

Lyrics CD insert (pdf file)

Songs composed by David Pannell. Vocals and instruments by David Pannell, except backing vocals on The Human Condition by Hamsa Hyder

Recorded at “The Office”, Albany, Western Australia, February 1998 to September 2001

Songs and recordings Copyright © David J. Pannell, 1998-2001

 

 

Oligopoly

A slowly growing collection of cover versions recorded entirely with voices. No instruments apart from a little bit of percussion on a couple  of them. There are four vocal parts in each song, and I've recorded two voices for each part, so it sounds like a small choir of eight voices. Recorded 2011-2013.  

To download, right click on song name and select "Save Target As ..." (Internet Explorer) or "Save Link As ..." (Firefox/Google Chrome).

Our Prayer (by Brian Wilson, from the album Smile by The Beach Boys, 1966).
Recorded 2012. (1:25, 2MB)

Penny Lane (by Lennon and McCartney, from the album Magical Mystery Tour by The Beatles, 1967).
Recorded 2011-2012. (2:54, 4MB)

Somebody That I Used To Know (by Wally de Backer, from the album Making Mirrors by Gotye, 2011).
Recorded 2012-2013. (4:06, 6MB)

Nowhere Man (by Lennon and McCartney, from the album Rubber Soul by The Beatles, 1965).
Recorded 2011-2012. (2:43, 4MB)

You and Whose Army? (by Radiohead, from the album Amnesiac by Radiohead, 2001).
Recorded 2012. (3:14, 5MB)

The genesis of these recordings is a request by my friend Jenny Simpson to arrange a couple of Beatles songs for her choir. I did Nowhere Man (a fairly obvious choice, given all the harmonies on the original) and Penny Lane (a much less obvious choice, and very challenging to arrange). I recorded demos of the arrangements, singing all the parts myself. Both the arrangements and the recordings worked out so well, and I enjoyed it so much, that I decided to make a project of it with other songs as well.

Vocal arrangements by David Pannell. Vocals by David Pannell.

Recorded at “Shabby Road”, Nedlands, Western Australia, 2011-2013

Arrangements and recordings Copyright © David J. Pannell, 2011-2013

 

 

 

Economy

A slowly growing collection of cover versions recorded simply with vocals and acoustic instruments only. Recorded 2011-2013.

To download, right click on song name and select "Save Target As ..." (Internet Explorer) or "Save Link As ..." (Firefox/Google Chrome).

Jesus, etc. (lyrics by Jeff Tweedy, music by Jeff Tweedy and Jay Bennett)

Recorded 2013. (3:58, 6MB)
Acoustic guitars
A magic song from one of my very favourite albums, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (2002) by WIlco. I saw them perform this in concert in 2013, and I worked out the chords from watching Jeff Tweedy's fingers. Although the meaning of the lyrics is not very explicit, there is something very moving about them. I especially like the line "Our love is all of God's money".

Long Black Veil (by Danny Dill and Marijohn Wilkin)
Recorded 2012. (3:27, 5MB)
Acoustic guitars
I first heard the version by Rosanne Cash (with Jeff Tweedy from Wilco) on The List (2009) and later the one by her father Johnny Cash from Orange Blossom Special (1965). I've never heard the original, released as a single by Lefty Frizzell in 1959. My arrangement includes a mix of elements from the two Cash-family versions, notably Jeff Tweedy's beautiful harmonies. I thought of recording it because my golfing buddy Tony Smith really likes Johnny Cash. Like many Johnny Cash songs, it tells the story of a tragic death.

One Man Guy (by Loudon Wainwright III). 
Recorded 2012. (3:59, 6MB)
Acoustic guitars
My version is based on the one from the album Poses (2001) by Rufus Wainwright. When I first heard this song, I thought that Rufus was declaring his fidelity to his boyfriend. Turns out it was written by his father, and is instead a statement of individual self-reliance and self-containment -- he's a one-man guy in the sense of performing a one-man show. That seemed to fit my music here since I perform all the vocals and instruments, so here's my go at the song.

Wedding Song (by Bob Dylan).
Recorded 2011. (4:56, 7MB)
Acoustic guitar, banjo
This is from Bob's 1974 album, Planet Waves, which I bought for 99 cents in 1976. I worked this song out while holidaying at Dunsborough that year. As a teenager I used to sing it in Dylan's original key, but this version has been lowered a bit to suit a 52 year old.

No Surprises (by Radiohead).
Recorded 2013. (3:56, 6MB)
Acoustic guitars, glockenspiel
From OK Computer (1997), one of the all-time great albums. I saw Radiohead perform this on their 1998 Australian Tour, which was the last time they visited Perth. I remember being struck by Jonny Greenwood playing the glockenspiel on stage (quite theatrically) for this song. It so happens that my daughter has a nice glockenspiel, so I have been able to reproduce something of the original sound (although in an acoustic version, obviously). In the middle of each verse there is a note that might sound a bit discordant (e.g. the "fill" of "landfill" in the first verse). It highlights that, although the music mostly sounds sweet, the message is decidedly not sweet. 

Valentine's Day is Over (by Billy Bragg).
Recorded 2013. (3:59, 6MB)
Acoustic guitars
From Workers' Playtime (1988). Billy is perhaps the most stridently left-wing singer-songwriter with a significant profile. This song, on the topic of domestic violence, I find very moving. It's sung from the woman's perspective, which is  interesting for a male singer. The woman narrator has had a miserable time with her dreadful partner, but in this song she is taking control. She's asserting that the relationship is over, and she has stacked his things "out on the landing".

The other recordings here have pretty complex arrangements and need a whole band (Option Value) or choir (Oligopoly) or multi-track recording system to be realised. It's also good to have some songs you can play simply, accompanied by a single instrument. That's what these are. Some of the recordings have more than one instrument on them, but the songs are amenable to being played with just one.

Vocals and instruments by David Pannell.

Recorded at “Shabby Road”, Nedlands, Western Australia, 2011-2013.

Recordings Copyright © David J. Pannell, 2011-2013

 

 

Conference

Songs performed at academic conferences:

CEED in December 2015. Written and performed at the conference of the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, Australian National University, 7-9 December 2015. Recorded 12-13 December 2015.

Agricultural Economics Society in April 2013. Performed at the 87th Annual Conference of the Agricultural Economics Society, University of Warwick, 8-10 April 2013. Recorded March 2013.

To download, right click on song name and select "Save Target As ..." (Internet Explorer) or "Save Link As ..." (Firefox/Google Chrome).

Theme Song from CEED (lyrics and music by David Pannell)
Recorded 12-13 December 2015 (2:37, 4MB)
Acoustic guitars, electric guitar, bass guitar, programmed drums

Make Up the Data (Australian version) (lyrics by David Pannell, music: traditional)
Recorded 2013. (2:45, 4MB)
Acoustic guitars, banjo, tambourine
Version with Australian/American pronunciation of data: "dah-ta" 

Make Up the Data (English version) (lyrics by David Pannell, music: traditional)
Recorded 2013. (2:45, 4MB)
Acoustic guitars, banjo, tambourine
Version with English pronunciation of data: "day-ta" 

The CEED one was written on the last night of the conference and performed in the closing session, with much audience participation. There is a copy on YouTube with a slide show from the conference.

The AES one has a longer story. About 25 years ago, my good friend and colleague Rob Fraser used to specialise in theoretical analyses of agricultural economics problems. I introduced him to the joys of spreadsheets and showed him how he could use these to implement numerical versions of his theoretical models. Rob took to spreadsheets with enthusiasm, using them to enrich his research papers with numerical results. However, he rarely went to the trouble of estimating parameters empirically, preferring to use illustrative examples. I used to tease him about this, including (for a Christmas party) writing and performing this song, an adapted version of the Australian bush ballad, Waltzing Matilda. Now, at Rob's request, I resurrected the song for a special performance at the Agricultural Economics Society conference in England in April 2013.

There are two versions here because of the different possible pronunciations of "data". I first recorded the one labelled "Australian version", using the "dah-ta" pronunciation, but Rob pointed out that the dominant pronunciation preferred by my audience in England would be "day-ta". So now you can take your pick.

Vocals and instruments by David Pannell.

Both songs recorded at “Shabby Road”, Nedlands, Western Australia.

Recordings Copyright © David J. Pannell, 2013-2015

 


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Last revised: December 20, 2015.