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Herman's Super Grub Disk Documentation

Edited Sunday, August 17 2008

This web-page is part of a larger site giving examples of how to install Windows+Ubuntu Linux operating systems 'dual boot' in a computer.  Illustrated Dual Boot HomePage

This page is now aligned towards the left so people with wide screens can open a terminal on the right and copy and paste commands more easily.

Where to Get Your Super Grub Disk

You can get your Super Grub Disk by following any of these links to a download site,

Main Web Site
Mirror Site

List of Super Grub Disk mirror sites http://geocities.com/supergrubdisk/

Super Grub Disk is free software, and it is only around 400 KB to download!
That's Kilobytes folks, not Megabytes, yes, you read that correctly!

It's small but mighty!

Super Grub Disk is available for,
  • For USB devices those are .tar.bz2 files, only around 300 KB.
  • For making into CD-ROMs, there are .iso.tar.bz2, or iso.gz files for Linux users.
  • There are also .ZIP files available for Windows users.
  • There are plain .iso files too, ready to use in case you don't have software for unpacking.
  • The files for making Super Grub Disk for CD vary between 400 to 500 KB or so to download.
  • For floppy disks there are .img files. Those are the largest downloads, 1.41 MB.
To choose the best file download for your intended use, you should read carefully and pick out which type of file you need from the file galleries.

If you are experiencing booting problems, the most important thing to do is to keep calm and take things slowly.
Just because you are having trouble booting does not mean you have lost any information on your hard disk.
You may have lost access to it in the way that you are used to, but your operating system and all your information are still there (in 99.999% of cases).

Chances are, Super Grub Disk will be able to either fix your problem for you instantly, or at least boot your operating system for you so you can fix the problem yourself after that.

Page Index

Introduction.

Main Purposes of Super Grub Disk.

Where to get Your Super Grub Disk.

Burning your Super Grub Cdrom .iso file to Disk in Ubuntu or other Linux.

Burning your Super Grub Cdrom .iso file to Disk in Windows 98SE.

Burning your Super Grub Cdrom .iso file to Disk in Windows XP.

How to Make your Super Grub Floppy Disk.

How to Make your Super Grub USB Disk.

Situations where Super Grub Disk is useful.

How To Use Super Grub Disk.

Super Grub Disk Quick Help!.

How To Build a Super Grub Disk/GParted CD / DVD.

Common Booting Errors and Some Possible Cures (now moved to GRUB Page).



Introduction
G.R.U.B.  is an acronym for GRand Unified Bootloader.
GRUB is the world's most advanced and capable bootloader, and it is easy to learn how to use it.
 
Super Grub Disk is the best software available today to use for solving many types of bootloader problems in your computer.  If you are a new user of Linux and you have not yet had time to learn all about GRUB's Command Line Interface, Super Grub Disk is for you.

For beginners, Super Grub Disk  has features that allow learners to complete operations that only advanced users who have studied and practiced GRUB commands could do before.
You can select what you want to do from simple menus.  Super Grub Disk will do many things for you automatically without the need for learning all the commands. Super Grub Disk helps to teach you what GRUB commands can be used for. You can learn them later when you are ready, at your own pace.

For advanced users, Super Grub Disk  gives a choice of using the Super Grub Disk menus, or switching to GRUB's Command Line Interface.
Just press your 'c' key from a Super Grub Disk menu.
There you will be able to use of all your favorite GRUB commands that you have come to rely on. Super Grub Disk provides access to GRUB's Command Line Interface even when the hard disk installed GRUB is inaccessible, or inoperable. (For example, even if there is no GRUB at all installed in the computer you want to work on). 
Even advanced users will find it faster to use Super Grub Disk's menu based options for some jobs.
If you want, you can edit Super Grub Disk's menus with your own commands to customize it and personalize it for own needs.  The use of Super Grub Disk menus saves lost time due to typing errors and gets most work done faster and easier than typing lots of commands manually.



Main Purposes of Super Grub Disk

    * To make life easier for new GNU/Linux users.
    * To educate people in how to use GRUB. This is why each option has its own explanation.





How to Burn your Super Grub Cdrom .iso file to Disk
In Ubuntu or other Linux, (if your Windows won't boot), or if you're using the LiveCD to download it because Ubuntu won't boot or maybe even neither will boot.
In Ubuntu lots of things are much easier than people might expect if they aren't used to it.

First, download the latest version of Super Grub Disk for CD-ROM.
Choose the .bz2 file is the smallest and fastest download, so it's the best choice. It doesn't really matter if you choose the .iso or one of the other types of file compression, they all have the same file inside.  
  1. Right-click on it and click 'extract here' from the right-click menu. 
  2. Look for a new file called super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso or whatever version you downloaded.
  3. Just put a CD-RW in the DVD/CD drive and wait a minute... ignore or close any automatic windows the might come up asking what I want to do with the CD. Then I right-click the sgd_0.9598.iso file and click 'write to disk'.
It's as simple as one, two, three!

You can use a plain CD-ROM or any optical disc, even a DVD. I think a CD-RW is the most economical for a Super Grub Disk. If you want to keep up to date you need a re-writable one because adrian15, the developer of SGD is a very hard worker and keeps making new versions of Super Grub Disk very often.
Super Grub DIsk doesn't occupy very much space in a CD, so you can use one of those smaller, mini sized CDs if you like.

Some people get stuck because they don't know how to erase a CD-RW in Ubuntu.
It's so simple! You don't even need to erase them first when you use them in Ubuntu. Just click 'write to disk' on the file and Ubuntu will notice if there is something already written on the disk and will let you know. You can decide if you want the disc erased or not.  If it's information you might want to keep you can try a different CD-RW. Otherwise click 'Erase'.

After watching the CD burner's progress bar for a few minutes you will have the latest Super
Grub Disk.

How to do the same thing, but from the command line?

1. Download:
Code:
herman@red:~$ wget http://forjamari.linex.org/frs/download.php/810/super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso.bz2

Result:
--05:55:56--  http://forjamari.linex.org/frs/download.php/810/super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso.bz2
           => `super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso.bz2'
Resolving forjamari.linex.org... 62.175.249.13
Connecting to forjamari.linex.org|62.175.249.13|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 432,680 (423K) [application/binary]

100%[====================================================>] 432,680       51.97K/s    ETA 00:00

05:56:06 (46.83 KB/s) - `super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso.bz2' saved [432680/432680]

herman@red:~$ bunzip2 super_grub_disk_0.9673.iso.bz2

Then put a CD-RW in the optical drive, right-click the sgd_0.9598.iso file and click 'write to disk'.





How to Burn your Super Grub CD-ROM .iso file to Disk In Windows 98SE
(if your Linux won't boot and you only have Windows 98),

You will need to make sure you download one of the Super Grub Disk Cdrom .iso files that have the .gz extension only. That's because Windows won't be able to understand how to unpack files that have been compressed with Linux's bz2 level of file compression.
You might even need to install software like WinZip just to unpack your .gz file in Windows.

So let's say I downloaded sgd_0.9590.iso.gz, which is 474 KB, in my Windows 98SE.
I installed WinZip 9.0. to unpack it with.
Okay, then I right-click the sgd_0.9590.iso.gz file, and select  'Open with WinZip'.
A WinZip Window opens to nag me to buy WinZip for $29.00 US, but I can use the evaluation version for now, so I click the button for that. I would need to organize myself with a credit card if I wanted to be able to buy commercail software.
A new Window opens and I see my file, click on it and click 'Extract', and extract the file to 'My Documents'.
The new file is titled: sgd_source_code_0.9590

Then I insert a CD-RW disk in the CD-ROM drive.
The first job is to erase the re-writable disk first. I have NTI CD&DVD-Maker Gold in Windows 98 as my CD writing program. NTI CD&DVD-Maker Gold must also be installed seperately, Windows 98SE doesn't come with it's own CD burner. So I go to My Computer, and open the CD drive with NTI CD&DVD-Maker, and erase the rewritable disk.

After that, I went to 'My Documents' again and right-clicked sgd_source_code and clicked 'Open'.
It opened in NTI CD&DVD-Maker Gold. NTI CD&DVD-Maker Gold wanted to make a data CD out of it, but I cancelled that.
I clicked 'File'-->'Create Disc from ISO Disc Image File...', and selected sgd_source_code_0.9590 again, in the 'Open' window, and clicked the 'Open' button.
In the next window, 'NTI Write CD', the radio button for 'Write' was already marked, and the speed was already set to 4x, a nice safe speed for a software disk, so I clicked 'Start'.
Pretty soon the CD was burned successfully and my CD-ROM tray popped open.
After closing everything, I restarted my computer with the CD-ROM in the drive to try it out.

The result is, I have a working Super GRUB 0.9590 Disk. Just to make sure, I booted Windows 98SE with it and then Ubuntu Fiesty Fawn.
 
Exactly get through all those steps I just described depends on what version of Windows you have, what kind of file compression and extraction utility you use, and what brand of CD burning software you have in Windows. It is impossible to give any exact instructions that will suit everyone.
Whatever CD burning software you have, just make sure you burn the .iso file as an .iso, and not as a data disc, and you should end up with a bootable CD from it.

If you have Windows XP you can probably do these jobs easier than with Windows 98SE.


How to Burn your Super Grub Cdrom .iso file to Disk In Windows XP
(if your Linux won't boot and you only have Windows XP),

You will need to make sure you download one of the Super Grub Disk Cdrom .iso files that have the .gz extension only. That's because Windows won't be able to understand how to unpack files that have been compressed with Linux's bz2 level of file compression.
If fact, Windows XP couldn't even unpack my sgd_0.9590.iso.gz by itself, I expected Windows to have progressed since Windows 98, but it seems that Windows XP needs third party software installed just to handle a .gz file too.
SO, I had to go find some a file compression app I can install.
It looks like I hit the jackpot, I found a choice of three,
 
7-Zip 4.42, from www.7-zip.org, which supports 7z, ZIP, RAR, CAB, ARJ, CPIO, RPM,DEB, GZIP, BZIP2, and TAR formats. That looks good. Hey, no wonder it's good, it open source!

Or I can try out WinRAR 3.50, that's from www.rarlabs.com, read about it there. It looks good.

Or I can try ZipGenius 6.0, from www.zipgenius.it. ZIpGenius looks like another great application, it's also free and has lots of functions.

Well I can't decide...   I think I'll go with 7-Zip 4.42.exe, so I downloaded that and installed it in my Windows XP.

This time when I right-clicked my sgd_0.9590.iso.gz file I got a line at the top of my right-click menu titled 7-Zip, and from a submenu from that I selected 'extract here'.
Now, finally, I have a file called sgd_source_code_0.9590

The first job again, is to erase the CR-RW. Windows needs a third party application installed before it can erase a CD-RW. Actually I already have NTI CD&DVD-Maker 7 installed, that came with my computer when I bought it. It works about the same as NTI CD&DVD-Maker Gold in the Windows 98SE example above, scroll up if you want to read that.

Just in case there someone who has no CD Recorder in Windows,  I will install InfraRecorder from http://infrarecorder.sourceforge.net/, which is free, and only a very small download.
That package needs to be extracted with 7-Zip 4.42 too.
After that, it's possible to right-click on the InfaRecorder CD icon, and click 'Open'.
A window opens with four panes, I just ignored those and clicked 'Actions'-->'Burn Image', and a new window, titled 'Open' appeared, showing the contents of 'My Documents'.
My sgd_source_code_0.9590 was right there, I didn't have to open any other folders to navigate to it. Other people might need to go find their sgd_source_code_0.9590  file if it's inside another folder somewhere.
Then I clicked 'Open'.
In the next window I selected to burn the disc at a nice slow speed, 1x, and everything else (the defaults), looked okay to me, so I clicked 'OK'.

Exactly get through all those steps I just described depends on what version of Windows you have, what kind of file compression and extraction utility you use, and what brand of CD burning software you have in Windows. It is impossible to give any exact instructions that will suit everyone.
Whatever CD burning software you have, just make sure you burn the .iso file as an .iso, and not as a data disc, and you should end up with a bootable CD from it.







How to make your Super Grub Floppy Disk In Ubuntu or other Linux,

To make a Super Grub floppy disk in Ubuntu,
  1. Put your sgd_0.9575_english_floppy.img.bz2 file in your /home/username directory if it isn't there already.
  2. Right click on it and click 'extract here'. You should get a new file out of it called super_grub_disk_floppy_english_0.9575.img
  3. Put a blank floppy disk in your machine's floppy disk drive.
  4. Open a terminal
  5. Use this 'dd' command to write SGD to the floppy disk, or you can copy mine and paste it into your own terminal if you want.
Do not include the herman@red:~$ part, (unless your name is herman and you have a computer named red too).
Code:
herman@bookpc:~$ dd if=super_grub_disk_floppy_english_0.9575.img of=/dev/fd0
Where: 'super_grub_disk_floppy_english_0.9575.img is the file name of your floppy disk image. The  easiest thing to do is to start typing the first two or three letters of the file name and then press your 'tab' key', the file name will be automatically completed for you.

That command should make the floppy drive light come on and you should hear some moaning and groaning noises coming from your floppy drive for a minute or so, then you should have a new Super GRUB floppy Disk.

In Windows
TO DO: Information will be added here.



How to make your Super Grub USB Disk in Ubuntu or other Linux,
Installation of SGD in a USB device from a Linux with GRUB installed

Installation of SGD in a USB device in a pc without any OS



Installation of SGD in a USB device in Linux with GRUB installed

Also see: How To: Make GRUB Thumb Drive by Qqmike at Kubuntu Web Forums

Some work in Linux is quicker from the command line and other work is quicker using the G.U.I.

The GUI way, (Recommended)

  1. If you downloaded the file through your web browser, probably you'll find it on your Desktop.
  2. Move the file into your /home/username directory.
  3. You just right-click the downloaded .tar.gz  or tar.bz2 or whatever package, and click 'Extract here'.
  4. When the contents are extracted you'll see a directory there somewhere called 'boot'.
  5. Just copy and paste, or drag 'n drop boot into your USB drive.
  6. Then you will need to use the command line interface or a GRUB shell just a little to install the USB disk's GRUB to MBR in the USB disk.  Re-install GRUB with a GRUB shell eg; with Live CD. While you're at it you might as well install GRUB to the first sector of the partition too, it won't do any harm.


The Linux Command Method (Optional)

1. Download your file with wget, (just to make it more interesting and prove how smart we are),
herman@amd46b:~$ wget http://forjamari.linex.org/frs/download.php/778/super_grub_disk_english_usb_0.9673.tar.bz2
--16:02:44--  http://forjamari.linex.org/frs/download.php/778/super_grub_disk_english_usb_0.9673.tar.bz2
           => `super_grub_disk_english_usb_0.9673.tar.bz2'
Resolving forjamari.linex.org... 62.175.249.13
Connecting to forjamari.linex.org|62.175.249.13|:80... connected.
HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
Length: 302,870 (296K) [application/binary]

100%[=======================================================================================================>] 302,870       37.86K/s    ETA 00:00

16:02:55 (28.02 KB/s) - `super_grub_disk_english_usb_0.9673.tar.bz2' saved [302870/302870]

Okay, the file's in our /home/username directory now, all we have to do is decompress it.

In case anyone doesn't know how to decompress files like this from the command line, here are two very good links about that,
File Compression - Quick explanation.

File Compression Tools For Linux - Another explanation with just a few more details.

Code:
herman@bookpc:~$ tar jxvf super_grub_disk_english_usb_0.9673.tar.bz2
or,
herman@bookpc:~$ tar zxvf sgd_usb_0.9577.tar.gz

You should have a new directory called 'boot' in your /home/username directory now.

Copy the /boot directory from /tmp/sgd_usb_0.9577 to your USB disk.
herman@bookpc:~$ cp -r boot /media/disk
Where: 'disk' is the name of your USB disk.
I presume it will be automatically mounted after you plug it in.
However, if you need to mount it with commands, here's a link just in case anyone doesn't know how, File Systems and Mounting Page.
NOTE: If there is any operating system in the USB disk already then you need to check first that you won't be over-writing the operating system's /boot directory first.
If it's just an empty USB drive then just go ahead.


Now it's time to install GRUB to MBR in the USB hard drive or flash memory stick.
You can install Grub in a USB flash memory stick using by adrian15's method
or use my method (Herman's method).


adrian15's method:


adrian15 said:
I do not like Herman instructions myself.

Let's see. You run:

mount

and you save the result somewhere else.
You then plug in the pendrive. Close the just opened windows.
Run


mount

and see what's the pendrive device. Something like /dev/sdc or whatever
it is ( You will find it in the one more line that it's added to the
first mount output).

Now you should run:



umount /dev/sdc

where /dev/sdc is your pendrive device.

Now let's do:


grub
grub>device (hd3) /dev/sdc
grub>root (hd3,0)
grub>setup (hd3)
grub>quit
So, just to clarify that a little, adrian15 is saying you should,
  1. run the mount command without the flash drive pluggedin yet,
  2. then you plug in the USB drive and wait for it to be automatically mounted.
  3. Run the mount command again and compare the results.
  4. It should be obvious which device is the flash memory drive. Let's say it's /dev/hdc.
  5. You tell GRUB that /dev/sdc = (hd3), which would be your fourth hard drive.
  6. You set GRUB's root device as (hd3,0), so you're going to install GRUB from 4th hard disk, 1st partition somewhere.
  7. You install GRUB to the fourth hard drive's MBR, (your USB drive)
  8. That's it, you're finished.







My (Herman) method,  - this always works well for me! :)

Open a  GNU GRUB shell with root priveledges.
herman@bookpc:~$ sudo grub

 [ Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported.   For
         the   first   word,  TAB  lists  possible  command
         completions.  Anywhere else TAB lists the possible
         completions of a device/filename. ]

grub> _
Now you should have a GNU/GRUB shell.

 [ Minimal BASH-like line editing is supported.   For
         the   first   word,  TAB  lists  possible  command
         completions.  Anywhere else TAB lists the possible
         completions of a device/filename. ]

grub> geometry (hd
 Possible disks are:  hd0 hd1 hd2
Take a look to see what disks you have by using 'tab completion'.
For this trick I have only typed most of the command and not completed it. Then I press 'Tab', and GRUB suggests possible ways for me to finish typing the command.
This tells me that I have three hard disks in this machine. Two will be the hard disks inside the computer, and one will be my external USB disk. I guess (hd2) will probably be the USB disk, but I'll need to check.

grub> geometry (hd2)
drive 0x82: C/H/S = 7936/1/32, The number of sectors = 253952, /dev/sda
   Partition num: 0,  Filesystem type is ext2fs, partition type 0x83
Okay, I completely typed (hd2) this time, but I want to check to be sure (hd2) is indeed my USB disk and not some other disk inside my computer.
The output here tells me that this is the correct disk because I happen to know that I have a lot of partitions in the other disks but this one only has one partition and it's only a small disk, so this confirms to me that (hd2) is my USB disk. Good.

grub> root (hd2,0)
The 'root' command tells GRUB to focus all its attention in the USB disk's file system. So, in other words, it will be the USB disk's GRUB we will be installing. If we didn't do this, we might be installing our hard disk installed GRUB to the USB disk by mistake. We want to be sure it will be the GRUB from the Super Grub Disk /boot directory that we just copied to the USB disk that gets installed there.

grub> setup (hd2)
 Checking if "/boot/grub/stage1" exists... yes
 Checking if "/boot/grub/stage2" exists... yes
 Checking if "/boot/grub/e2fs_stage1_5" exists... yes
 Running "embed /boot/grub/e2fs_stage1_5 (hd2)"...  24 sectors are embedded.
succeeded
 Running "install /boot/grub/stage1 (hd2) (hd2)1+24 p (hd2,0)/boot/grub/stage2 /boot/grub/menu.lst"... succeeded
Done.
It looks like we have done it!
The setup command shown here installs GRUB to MBR in the USB disk.

grub> quit
This command is to quit the GRUB shell.

herman@red:~$ exit
This is just to to exit the terminal.

Now, reboot and see if your new SGD USB works!

Remember, you will need to have your CMOS (BIOS) set to boot the USB disk.
Otherwise, in most computers you can just press 'F8', or 'F12', (or whatever key it is for your computer) during bootup for a menu of bootable devices from which you should be able to select your USB disk.
Not all computers have a BIOS that allows booting a USB drive, here's how it works in one of my computers, How I boot from my BIOS with my F12 key (or F8 key in most PCs).






Installation of SGD in a USB device in a pc without any OS
Mount your usb hd untar file in your usb hd
umount your usb hd (or copy contents of it to usb hd)
umount your hd
(Instead of mounting and umounting on linux you can do it on windows)

Set up your bios so that it boots your cdrom and that your usb device
is recognised as the first hard disk (hd0).
(Usually first IDE or SCSI disk is set by the bios to be hd0)
Boot from cdrom: Super Grub Disk Cdrom

Choose option Restore Grub on MBR automatically.
As your usb hd or pendrive will be recognised as hd0 you'll usb hd
will be prepared to have Grub on it.

Now you can reboot and set the bios so that your usb device
is recognised as the first hard disk (hd0). And in a such a way
that you can boot this usb hd.







Situations where Super Grub Disk is useful:
Even if your computer has no bootloader problems right now, it is still a good idea to keep a Super Grub Disk somewhere around your computer for an emergency. All good system administrators should have one.

Super Grub Disk can boot up a computer when the 'IPL' (Initial Program Loader) code in the MBR does not point to the partition with the operating system that the user wants to boot up.
For example, when someone is dual booting Windows with a Gnu/Linux operating system and they have to re-install Windows. Now the computer will only boot Windows. Super GRUB Disk features the fastest and easiest way to re-install GRUB to MBR.
Super Grub Disk can also write other bootloader codes to MBR for you, from the operating system of your choice. For example, you can even restore the Windows bootloader code to MBR if you want to uninstall your Gnu/Linux operating system. Super Grub Disk can easily perform quite a large range of other very useful functions that make troubleshooting and diagnosis of bootloader problems a lot faster and easier. For example, SGD has the ability to scan a computer for various files involved in the booting process. This scanning can save the user a lot of time and tedious repetition.

Super Grub Disk helps Windows users who want to use GRUB as their boot manager. GRUB is actually a much better for managing multiple boot Windows arrangements than Windows' own bootloader.  A few Windows users who are clever enough like to add a Linux distro that contains GRUB just for this purpose. So, Super Grub Disk also has functions even to help those who are installing more than one Windows or who have Windows installed in a non-first partition or hard disk.







How To Use Super Grub Disk

Super Grub Disk can be used from a floppy disk or a CD, or a USB disk.

Before you can do anything with Super Grub Disk, or any other software disk, you first need to make sure your BIOS is enabled to boot from the CD Drive or Floppy disk drive, USB port or whatever device you need the disk to run from. This is done in the BIOS boot sequence.  To find out what I mean by that, click on the following link, BIOS Page.



When your computer boots with the Super Grub Disk in the appropriate drive, you should see a nice Language Selection Screen, like the one shown below.

 Super Grub Disk based on GNU GRUB version 0.97-os.1   (638K lower/523200k up  
per memory)


Super Grub Disk                                                        


   Press enter or -> to boot the selected OS, 'e' to edit the
commands before booting, 'r' to reload, 'c' for a command-line,
'a' to set grub_add variable (useful for braille in Knoppix)
'/?N' to search or <- to go back if possible.



 Super Grub Disk based on GNU GRUB version 0.97-os.1   (638K lower/523200k up  
per memory)


Super Grub Disk (WITH HELP)                :-)))                     
Super Grub Disk (NO HELP)                    :-|                    
GRUB => MBR & !LINUX! (1)         AUTO     ;-)))
GRUB => MBR & !LINUX! (>2)      MANUAL      |8-)                   
!LINUX! (1)         AUTO     
!LINUX! (>2)      MANUAL
!WIN!                                       :(((
WIN => MBR & !WIN!            :(((((((((((((((((
EASY LIVE SWAP

   Press enter or -> to boot the selected OS, 'e' to edit the
commands before booting, 'r' to reload, 'c' for a command-line,
'a' to set grub_add variable (useful for braille in Knoppix)
'/?N' to search or <- to go back if possible.


Quick menu explanations             
       
        Super Grub Disk (WITH HELP)              :-)))                                                        
               You can choose Super Grub Disk with the classical (normal) help.
       
        Super Grub Disk (NO HELP)                  :-|
               You can choose SGD not to display any help. For those who know what they are doing                 and in a hurry. For advanced users.
       
       GRUB => MBR & !LINUX! (1)         AUTO     ;-)        
         This is the indicated option for newbies. The wink.
        It tries to find the first stage1 file, installs GRUB into the MBR,
        tries to find menu.lst and boots its.
       
        GRUB => MBR & !LINUX! (>=2)      MANUAL   |8-)
        Same thing as above, but if you have more than one Linux now you can choose which stage1           to install and which menu.lst to boot.
       
        !WIN!                                     :(((
        So sad... this option boots windows.
       
        WIN => MBR & !WIN!      :(((((((((((((((((((((
       This is even more sad... this option adds a syslinux bootloader that
        chainloads the first active partition which usually contains Windows.

        EASY LIVE SWAP
       This option switches the hard disk boot priority around in the BIOS using (map) commands,            but the changes are not persistent.




 Super Grub Disk based on GNU GRUB version 0.97-os.1   (638K lower/523200k up  
per memory)


<--Main Menu.lst
*S.G.D. Language Selection.
English Super Grub Disk                                              
Castellano Super Disco Grub
-Catala Super Disc Grub
Eureska Super Disc Grub
Galego Super Disco Grub
Deutsche Super-GRUB-Disk
Francais Super Grub Disk
Italiano Super Grub Disk
Slovensky Super Grub DIsk
...Copyright (GPL 2 License)

   Press enter or -> to boot the selected OS, 'e' to edit the
commands before booting, 'r' to reload, 'c' for a command-line,
'a' to set grub_add variable (useful for braille in Knoppix)
'/?N' to search or <- to go back if possible.

This is the language selection screen.
The Main Menu.lst is available when you make your own personal Super Grub Disk bootable CD by combining one or more Live Linux distros with Super Grub Disk in your own .iso file, and  burning that to CD. To see what I mean, check this, How To Build a Super Grub Disk/GParted CD / DVD.

There will be an introduction page as shown below,
cat is on
configfile (cd)/boot/sgd/S10en/menu.lst
INTRODUCTION


Grub is a  very complete bootloader which can do much more
than just boot operating systems (OSes).

This GRUB disk helps people to discover these lesser known
options. It also helps people solving common boot problems
by means of the running various Grub commands which you
will find wrapped on simple menus.

Super Grub Disk has an educational aim also.
Each option has its own explanation.

However, Super Grub Disk can be very Super, but...
it is NOT perfect, so...

Any request or improvement idea is welcome.
Please send your email titled:'SGD "your idea"
to:
    adrian15 ARROBA raulete PUNTO net

(Where ARROBA is @ , and 'PUNTO'  is '.' )
Pause. Press a key.


_

it is NOT perfect, so...

Any request or improvement idea is welcome.
Please send your email titled:'SGD "your idea"
to:
    adrian15 ARROBA raulete PUNTO net

(Where ARROBA is @ , and 'PUNTO'  is '.' )
Pause. Press a key.
**************** **********************************************
************ ADVICE *******************************************
****** FOR 2 (OR MORE) HARD DISKS OWNERS **********************
******                                  ***********************
******                                  ***********************
****** If SGD SEEMS NOT TO WORK         ***********************
****** PLEASE USE THE FOLLOWING MENU:   ***********************
******                                  ***********************
******                                  ***********************
*     BOOT & TOOLS => LIVESWAP => EASY LIVESWAP               *
******                                  ***********************
******                                  ***********************
******                                  ***********************
***************************************************************
Pause. Press a key.
_

********************* *****************************************
Pause. Press a key.
NEWBIE HELP:
============

If you want to recover your Linx boot or
if you want GRUB back in your MBR
you should choose:
OPTION:           GNU/LINUX
OPTION:           FIX BOOT OF GNU LINUX (GRUB)

The you will have to select a partition
(Usually if it is your first Linux installation
you will only have one partition)
and SGD will show you:

SGD has done it!

Next screen will let you reboot your computer.
You will have to remove SGD CD from the CDROM bay
and then check if GRUB boots as always.

Pause. Press a key.
Super Grub Disk 0.9673
IV_JORNADAS_DE_SOFTWARE_LIBRE_HALT_EN_TRUEL Editition
Copywrite (C) 2005,2006, 2007 adrian15
Super Grub Disk comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY; for details, see
Copyright in menu.
This is free software, and you are welcome to redistribute it
under certain conditions; for details see copywrite in the menu.
Pause. Press a key.

_



 Super Grub Disk based on GNU GRUB version 0.97-os.1   (638K lower/523200k up  
per memory)


<--S.G.D. Language Selection.  (Go back)                                   
|====================> English Super Grub Disk (Help) <===================|
Gnu/Linux
Windows
Boot & Tools
Advanced
Quit


    Press enter or -> to boot the selected OS, 'e' to edit the
commands before booting, 'r' to reload, 'c' for a command-line,
'a' to set grub_add variable (useful for braille in Knoppix)
'/?N' to search or <- to go back if possible.
This 'English Super Grub Disk' menu serves instead as the main menu. This is the one central menu that all the main options branch off from. We can start here and return again after exploring each of Super Grub Disk's other menus.


There are two main ways to use your Super Grub Disk, these are:



Select the appropriate Super Grub Menu option
Super Grub Disk's English Menu has  four options plus the Quit menu.

The first two options are for those who like things quick and easy,
Gnu/Linux is for computers with a single hard disk and just one or two operating systems when you want to boot Linux or install your Linux's GRUB boot loader to MBR.
Windows is for computers with a single hard disk and just one or two operating systems when you want to boot Windows, or install your Windows's NTLDR boot loader to MBR.

Boot & Tools leads to another menu that lets you boot a Master Boot Record of a non-first hard disk, boot an operating system by it's boot sector, activate a partition (set the boot flag), and hide or unhide a partition.

Advanced is for complex computers, possibly with many partitions and multiple hard disks.
In most of these menus you can expect to be asked to select a hard disk from a menu and then a partition, it's not as automatic as in the simple menus, but it's still pretty easy once you try it.

GRUB helps you
boot your Linux OS,
restore GRUB in a MBR (you can choose which hard disk's MBR too),
install GRUB's IPL to a partition (boot sector),
or
restore NTLDR's IPL in a MBR.
LILO is for installing LiLo's IPL in an MBR.
Gnu/Linux (Advanced) contains the options to
restore GRUB's or LiLo's IPL to MBR for you,
boot a Linux OS by it's menu.lst file,
boot a Linux OS by it's kernel directly (via symlinks),
or boot any OS by its boot sector if the boot sector contians an IPL for a boot loader.
You can also set the boot flag on a Linux partition, (sometimes needed for LiLo).
Windows (Advanced) leads to a menu where you can
restore Window's NTLDR bootloader's IPL to MBR (equivalent to FIXMBR),
boot Windows by its boot sector (bypassing the MBR),
boot Windows on a non-first hard disk,
set the boot flag on a Windows partition,
and
re-install Windows NTLDR's IPL to a boot sector (equivalent to FIXBOOT).
Boot other OSes give you a menu for booting
Hurd
and
Open Solaris
Special Boot offers you to swap hard disks and boot, which means your hard disks will be temporarily switched as far as your BIOS can tell.
Configuration is a menu where you can have some fun with color schemes or access some special keyboard settings if you need them.
Miscellanea give you a menu for selecting to boot your Linux installation or fix a Windows boot sector (equivalent to FIXBOOT).

and finally,
Quit has two options,
Halt P.C. (Shut down)
or
Reboot P.C. (Restart)

 


Press your 'c' key to go into GRUB Command Line mode

It is important to realize that all of Super Grub Disk's menus and functions are based on commands that can be optionally typed by hand at the Command Line Interface when you know which commands to use. GRUB's Command Line Interface is very useful because it provides feedback. This feedback can provide important clues to help a user solve a booting problem or teach a new user how to use GRUB better by telling them what to do next.

Super Grub Disk can provide a Command Lne Grub Interface when there may be no GRUB at all in the computer for one reason or another, (it does happen sometimes).

To learn a little about how to use GRUB's Command Line mode, click on the following link,
GRUB's Command Line Interface, (in this website's GRUB Page).




Super Grub Disk Quick Help
This section is to list some common problems and how they can be solved quickly with Super Grub Disk.

Please click on a problem from this list to see what you can do about it and how Super Grub Disk can help you. This list is not exhaustive and more will be added as time goes on.



Possible Problems:

I am Primarily a Windows User and....

MBR related problems:

I reinstalled Windows and Linux no longer boots.

I installed Grub to MBR with a Gnu/Linux distro (dual boot), and Windows no longer boots.

I installed Windows on a first hard disk but I unplugged it and plugged it in as a non-first hard disk. Now I want to boot it.



I am Primarily a Linux User and....
 
MBR related problems:

I reinstalled Windows and Linux no longer boots.

I installed Grub, (or Lilo), to MBR but I can't find it. I have more than one hard disk in this computer. Maybe it went to the MBR of the wrong hard disk. I want to try booting from another hard disk to find out.


menu.lst related problems:

I made a mistake when I edited my menu.lst file and Linux no longer boots.

Grub problems
I'm getting a black screen with a grub>_ prompt

I get a black screen with grub>_ on it





Quick Solutions:



I installed GRUB to MBR with a Gnu/Linux distro (dual boot), and Windows no longer boots.

1) I just want to boot Windows for now, I'll fix it later,

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3.  Windows
   4. Boot Windows

This will boot Windows for now for you and you can verify that Windows is still okay and able to be booted. You can access all your data and get any urgent work done. You can fix the problem more permanently later on when you have time or you are in a better mood.

2) I  want my MBR pointing to Windows  bootloader again  - right now!

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3.  Windows
   4. Fix Boot of Windows



I installed Windows on a first hard disk but I unplugged it and plugged it in as a non-first hard disk. Now I want to boot it.

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3.  Boot and Tools
   4.  Boot Master Boot Record (MBR)











I reinstalled Windows and Linux no longer boots.

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3. Gnu/Linux
   4. Fix Boot of Gnu/Linux (GRUB)
   5. select your Linux partition
   6. see message, 'SGD has succeeded'
   7. you're done! reboot

 
I think I made a mistake when I edited my menu.lst file and Linux no longer boots.
You might need to use Super Grub Disk to boot with so you can fix your menu.lst file easliy. Right now you can't fix the file because you can't boot, and you can't boot because you can't fix the file... so you are stuck!
Don't worry, SGD to the rescue!

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3. Gnu/Linux
   4. Boot Gnu/Linux Directly


'Boot Gnu/Linux Directly' will bypass the menu.lst file and boot your Linux OS via symlinks to the kernel in the root of the filesystem.

I installed GRUB, (or LiLo), to MBR but I can't find it. I have more than one hard disk in this computer. Maybe it went to the MBR of the wrong hard disk. I want to try booting from another hard disk to find out.

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3.  Boot and Tools
   4. Boot Master Boot Record (MBR)
   5. Boot Master Boot Record
   6. Choose a hard disk from the list



I'm getting a black screen with a grub>_ prompt
Usually this means GRUB's stage1 and stage1_5 files in the MBR and first track of the hard disk are okay, and stage2 in the Linux partition is alright but there is no menu.lst file or if there is one it has been renamed or moved.
Super Grub Disk can help you by booting your Linux kernel and initrd.img directly (via symlinks), so you will be bypassing the menu.lst file.

   1. boot your SGD floppy disk, USB disk or CD-ROM
   2. English Super Grub Disk
   3. Gnu/Linux
   4. Boot Gnu/Linux Directly


I get a black screen with grub>_ on it
It's not a GRUB prompt if the underscore isn;t blinking and you can't type a command after it.







============================================================

Linux won't boot

    * GNU/Linux is installed in your pc, dual booting with Windows on the same hard disk. You needed to reinstall Windows, but when Windows re-installs it overwrites your MBR with its own code to make the MBR point only to the Windows bootloader. You no longer have the option for booting GNU/Linux as GRUB menu no longer appears on boot. You can use Super Grub Disk to boot Linux with for now, or you can automatically restore the MBR code and make it point to GRUB in your Gnu/Linux installation again. See 'Restore GRUB in Hard Disk' feature, on the English Super Grub Disk menu.
    * You have more than one hard disk in your computer. You have Windows on one hard disk and you just installed Linux on another. You asked Linux to write GRUB to MBR. When the computer reboots for the first time though, it still only boots into Windows like before. ???  Maybe GRUB has been written to MBR on a non-first hard disk by mistake, where the BIOS won't see it. The BIOS only looks for the MBR on the first hard disk for the bootloader's code. You can check this and verify whether or not this is the problem by booting from the MBR on the non-first hard disk with S.G.D.  See the 'Classic Boot' menu, available from the Super GRUB Disk English Super Grub Disk menu.
    * You are multi-booting more than one Linux operating system. Since your second Linux system may be a only for testing purposes, you don't want the second Linux installation to overwrite your main system's code on your MBR. Instead, you install the bootloader code for the test install to the first sector of its own partition. You can boot it with Super GRUB Disk, and add the test install's entry to the main system's GRUB configuration file later on if this install is to be kept. Some Linux enthusiasts make test installs that are just for conducting experiments on that might break the system, so the test install is only temporary anyway.  In that case you can just boot the partition or disk it is on with Super Grub Disk, and not install its bootloader to MBR. Super Grub Disk has several ways to manually boot or scan your computer for a Linux partition that isn't listed in any bootloader  menu available from the MBR. See 'Boot Gnu/Linux and other OSes', 'Special Boot', and 'Classic Boot', all available from the Super Grub Disk's English Super Grub Disk menu.
    * You are normally a skilled or semi-skilled Linux  user, and you tried editing your /boot/grub/menu.lst file (to add a nice fancy splash image you made,or something like that), but you must have made some kind of an error, and now your computer won't boot at all. You can boot with Super GRUB Disk and fix your mistake. See 'Boot Gnu/Linux and other OSes', 'Special Boot', and 'Classic Boot', all available from the Super Grub Disk's English Super Grub Disk menu.

Windows won't boot

    * Windows was installed in your computer and you installed Linux to make it into a dual boot computer. The Linux install went smoothly, writing code to your MBR to make it point to GRUB in the new Linux install. It boots into Linux fine, but you are not offered a choice in the new grub menu for selecting Windows.  You may be new to Linux, so you don't know how to edit your new GRUB menu to add the option for booting Windows. You have important files in Windows you need to have ready by a certain deadline and you haven't got time right now to start learning Linux already. You just want to be able to boot Windows right now until you can get your urgent work out of the way. You'll learn how to fix your installed version of GRUB later when you have some spare time. You can boot Windows automatically for now with Super Grub Disk. You can use the 'Boot Windows' function found in the Super Grub Disk's English Super Grub Disk menu.
    * You have more than one Windows installation in a hard disk, and you need to 'hide' one Windows from the other to make either of them bootable. You need the 'Tools' menu, available from the Super Grub Disk's English Super Grub Disk menu.
    * You have Windows installed on a non-first hard disk, and you need to be able to 'swap' hard disks with Super Grub Disk to be able to boot it.
    * You can not boot Windows because your MBR is corrupt. With Super Grub Disk you will be able to boot the partition where Windows reside. You can use 'Classic Boot', available from the Super Grub Disk English Super Grub Disk menu and then choose, 'Boot Partition'.
    * No Active Partition Found message appears. With Super Grub Disk you will be able to activate partitions. You need the 'Tools' menu, available from the Super Grub Disk's English Super Grub Disk menu.

===========================================================














How To Build Your Own
 GParted LiveCD/Puppy Linux/Super Grub Disk CD.
Edited Saturday, August 04 2007
This how-to has just been freshly updated, but it needs to be updated again already, Puppy Linux version 2.17.1 is now out. Release notes for Puppy Linux version 2.17.1
I will update this how-to when I get time.

We all know how useful and versatile Super Grub Disk is, just look in the rest of this page if you want to see all the things Super Grub Disk can do for you.
Here's yet another use for Super Grub Disk most people probably wouldn't otherwise be aware of. We can use Super Grub Disk as a base for making our own combinations of our favorite LiveCDs! 

The first time this how-to was made, it seemed like a good idea to make this combination of three great distros on one CD, even though I was aware that Puppy Linux already contains its own GParted. So why do we need two versions of GParted in the same CD?

Firstly because it's important to be using the very latest version of GParted LiveCD.

Secondly because the GParted-Clonezilla LiveCD also includes the latest Partimage,  TestDisk and Photorec,  as well as Clonezilla, all of which I really like.
The CD that we will make below here features GParted-Clonezilla livecd 2.0 which is based on both GParted-0.3.4-8 and CLonezilla-1.0.3-18, which are current at the time this how-to is being made.

Puppy Linux boots up from the CD and loads itself entirely into the PC's memory, so once Puppy Linux is up and running you can take the CD out!  Puppy Linux will keep on running in the RAM. That makes it a great rescue CD, because you can then have the CD drive available for copying any files you need to rescue to a CD-ROM.

To access your files, Puppy Linux has a great file system mounting utility called Pmount, just right-click on the desktop and go -->Filesystem-->'Pmount'. It's quick and very simple to use, you don't need to know any Linux commands.

Puppy Linux can also play DVD movies very well. In fact, Puppy Linux will amaze you! Puppy Linux can run even well in many older computers with moderate hardware, and yet seems to be able to do everything if not more than some of the full size distros. It's great!
Put Puppy Linux through its paces and practice with it a little, you'll fall in love with Puppy!


There are two purposes to this how-to.

One is to make a useful CD, but you may be able to download an .iso for some other utility CD you like already made. Or just use three separate disks, CD-ROMs are cheap these days. It is kind of nice to only need to carry one CD instead of three if you're traveling. If you're at home it's tidier to have just one CD to keep than three of them.

Second, but most important is the fun and educational value of the exercise.
A lot of people like some kind of 'do-it-yourself' project. This is more work than just downloading software already made for you, but it's more fun. You get a sense of achievement and you learn something.
Following how-tos like this are one way to learn a little more about GRUB and Linux commands.
Some of you may be interested in learning how to make your own bootable CDs using Super Grub Disk as a base. If you can follow this example and make a bootable CD then you can probably make some other combination of your own choice combining some of these ideas with ideas of your own.

You should use a CD-RW disk for your project rather than a blank CD-R in case you make a mistake or decide you can improve something. CD-RWs, as we all know, can be erased and re-written, but CD-R disks can't.

This is a "copy & paste" HowTo! The easiest way to follow this exercise is to open your own command line (terminal) and simply copy and paste the commands (except where you have to provide own specific information like disk and partition details, hostnames, passwords,...). This saves you a lot of time and effort and helps to avoid typos.

You should only copy and paste the commands. Those don't begin until after the $ (prompt).
Many of these tables shown for illustration also include the outputs or feedback from the commands. These can vary from one machine to another but should still serve to give an idea what should happen.
You should be careful not to copy any of these example outputs as part of your commands.
The commands are usually only in the top line, results, feedback or output is normally underneath.

Okay, let's get started...

Follow this link to find a download mirror for Super GRUB Disk and download the latest cdrom version of  Super GRUB Disk. For example, the .iso file I have this time is called sgd_0.9598.iso
The size of that file is only 394.1 kb, so it isn't a big download at all.

After we download any .iso files we always run an md5sum integrity check on them to make sure they are genuine and intact.
herman@red:~$ md5sum sgd_0.9598.iso
d283da5d195be1ff434e289cf48280b7  sgd_0.9598.iso
I don't know where to find the md5sum I should expect for Super GRUB Disk, but I still ran the MD5sum on it anyway.

Download an .iso for the latest GParted -- LiveCD.  The one I chose was GParted-Clonezilla-2.0 , 133.1 mb.
GParted LiveCD is the greatest hard disk partitioning software in the world. It also includes Partimage for making backups of entire partitions and TestDisk for MBR and partition recovery work.
gparted-clonezilla-2.0.iso (GParted-livecd-0.3.4-8 and Clonezilla 1.0.3-18)
MD5SUM : f8744b2ef29262750fd31ea7bcb9dce7
herman@red:~$ md5sum gparted-clonezilla-2.0.iso
f8744b2ef29262750fd31ea7bcb9dce7  gparted-clonezilla-2.0.iso


Puppy Linux is a very special and very small Linux distro that can do some amazing things!
Puppy Linux Home Page.
If you haven't tried our Puppy Linux already you are in for a heck of a surprise! You can do a lot with Puppy Linux.
I downloaded  puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso, 89.9 Mb.
Here are the release notes, http://www.puppylinux.com/download/release-2.16.htm
Get puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso live-CD with size 89.9MB
and this md5sum: 54e14cdd7f892e0352b5c5d53c30ab17
herman@red:~$  md5sum puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso
54e14cdd7f892e0352b5c5d53c30ab17  puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso

You should have an .iso file for each of those now in your /home/username directory.

In this how-to we are planning to take files from three different .iso images and combine them all in one folder and make it into one single combination .iso image.
Let's make the new directory for copying the files from the three .iso s into,
Code:
herman@red:~$ mkdir supergpartpuppy



We'll mount each of those .iso files one at a time so we can copy the files out of each one into our new supergpartpuppy directory. Mounting the .iso image is a shortcut so we won't need to burn them to CD first, it will save time and save money for CDs too.
First, puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso, we need to make a mount point for it,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mkdir /media/puppyiso

Next, we mount it,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t iso9660 puppy-2.16-seamonkey-fulldrivers.iso /media/puppyiso/
Immediately following this we should see an icon on our desktop called puppyiso and we can open that to view all the files inside.


Next , we'll copy all the files from puppyiso into our new superpartpuppy directory,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo cp -r /media/puppyiso/* supergpartpuppy/





Second, GParted-Clonezilla-2.0.iso, we need to make a mount point for it first,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mkdir /media/gpartclonziso

Next, we mount it,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t iso9660 gparted-clonezilla-2.0.iso /media/gpartclonziso/
An icon should now appear on our desktop called gpartclonziso and we can open that to view all the files inside. 

Next , we'll add all the files out of gpartclonziso to our superpartpuppy directory.
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo cp -r /media/gpartclonziso/* supergpartpuppy/


One problem is that Super Grub Disk and GParted LiveCD both have a /boot/grub directory and they both have a /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
If I'm going to combine the files from both of those .isos into one directory, probably the Super GRUB Disk's files will overwrite the files from Gparted-Clonzilla that are already there and have the same name.
I need to overwrite GParted-Clonzilla's /boot/grub files with Super GRUB Disk's /boot/grub files, because Super Grub Disk has a more powerful GRUB. That's why I am leaving the Super GRUB Disk.iso to the last in this how-to.
But, I need to save GParted-Clonzilla's /boot/grub/menu.lst file somehow. That's why I'm going to plan ahead and use an 'mv' command to rename GParted LiveCD's /boot/grub/menu.lst and call it /boot/grub/menu.lsta instead, to differentiate it so it won't be overwritten.
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mv  supergpartpuppy/boot/grub/menu.lst supergpartpuppy/boot/grub/menu.lsta




Third, the Super Grub Disk .iso, we need to make a mount point for it first,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mkdir /media/supergrubiso

Next, we mount it,
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo mount -o loop -t iso9660 sgd_0.9598.iso /media/supergrubiso/
Immediately following this we should see an icon on our desktop called supergrubiso and we can open that to view all the files inside.


Let's copy the whole supergrubiso to supergpartpuppy where we can work on it.
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo cp -r /media/supergrubiso supergpartpuppy/

We want to copy all the files we need out of supergrub.iso into superpartpuppy, then we'll remove the extra copies and the files we don't need.
herman@red:~$ sudo mv  supergpartpuppy/supergrubiso/boot/grub/* supergpartpuppy/boot/grub/

herman@red:~$ sudo rmdir  supergpartpuppy/supergrubiso/boot/grub

herman@red:~$ sudo mv supergpartpuppy/supergrubiso/boot/* supergpartpuppy/boot/

herman@red:~$ sudo rm -R supergpartpuppy/supergrubiso


And then because we want to be able to do what we want with the directories and files inside our new superpartpuppy directory, we'll relax the file permissions in it with a chmod command.
That means we won't need to type sudo before every command anymore.
Code:
herman@red:~$ sudo chmod -R 777 supergpartpuppy/
If you want to learn why we had to do that, you should read Nana Långstedt's chmod and chown tutorials, Linux File Permissions and, How to change a file's owner and group in Linux.



======================================================

Okay, so now we have a superpartpuppy directory with files in it from three .iso files. We want to combine those into one bootable CD.
Super GRUB Disk has a file in it that we can edit and add booting instructions for the other two CDs in. That will give us a Super Grub menu when we boot up the CD and allow us to select which of the operating systems on the CD we want to boot into.

The file we need to edit is called menu.lst and it's inside superpartpuppy directory, and inside supergrubiso, inside /boot, inside /grub.
To get it the easiest way, use this command,
Code:
herman@red:~$ gedit supergpartpuppy/boot/grub/menu.lst

It should look like this, 'before',
# You can edit this file to add your own distribution
# You can choose default to 0 to select first entry
# which it is usually the entry for the default distro
#
#
# You can also set timeout to something as 10
#
# This is the shortcut to call Super Grub Disk (commented)
#title Super Grub Disk
## The two commands: setgrubdevice and usbshift are needed
## so that SGD works well.
#usbshift
#configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst
#
# Just after default and timeout statements you have to put
# setgrubdevice so that grub device is correctly set.




default 2
timeout 2
setgrubdevice # This is compulsory
#gfxmenu /boot/grub/message
foreground ffffff
background 0c00ff
color white/brown yellow/cyan


title Inicio normal / Normal Boot
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs

title Soporte de accesibilidad / Accesibility Support -->
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/menu2.lst

title Super Grub Disk
# The two commands: setgrubdevice and usbshift are needed
# so that SGD works well.
usbshift
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst

title Normal boot. Kernel is aware of Boot device
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash boot_device=$(grub_device)
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs

title Normal boot. Selecting kernel and initrd files depending on grub_device
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz_$(grub_device_string) lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs_$(grub_device_string)

title Selecthd test
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/choose/selecthd.lst

title findp test
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/choose/selectpart.lst
title set SGD variables and boot SGD

configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst



... and here's what it should look like 'after' it has been edited. If you want you can just highlight the entire text with your mouse in the example shown below, right-click and click 'copy'.
Use 'select all'-->'delete' to empty your old file and then  paste the details from the example below in there instead and click 'save' before closing the file.
# You can edit this file to add your own distribution
# You can choose default to 0 to select first entry
# which it is usually the entry for the default distro
#
#
# You can also set timeout to something as 10
#
# This is the shortcut to call Super Grub Disk (commented)
#title Super Grub Disk
## The two commands: setgrubdevice and usbshift are needed
## so that SGD works well.
#usbshift
#configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst
#
# Just after default and timeout statements you have to put
# setgrubdevice so that grub device is correctly set.




default 0
# timeout 10
setgrubdevice # This is compulsory
#gfxmenu /boot/grub/message
foreground ffffff
background 0c00ff
color white/brown yellow/cyan

title Super Grub Disk
# The two commands: setgrubdevice and usbshift are needed
# so that SGD works well.
usbshift
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst


title GParted-Clonezilla-2.0
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/menu.lsta

title Puppy-2.16-Seamonkey-Fulldrivers
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz  root=/dev/ram0 pmedia=cd
initrd $(grub_device)/initrd.gz

title Inicio normal / Normal Boot
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs

title Soporte de accesibilidad / Accesibility Support -->
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/menu2.lst

title Normal boot. Kernel is aware of Boot device
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash boot_device=$(grub_device)
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs

title Normal boot. Selecting kernel and initrd files depending on grub_device
kernel $(grub_device)/vmlinuz_$(grub_device_string) lang=es a11y=none root=/dev/ram0 ramdisk_size=100000 initrd=initramfs quiet BOOT=live splash
initrd $(grub_device)/initramfs_$(grub_device_string)

title Selecthd test
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/choose/selecthd.lst

title findp test
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/grub/choose/selectpart.lst

title set SGD variables and boot SGD
configfile $(grub_device)/boot/sgd/menu.lst



That should be it, now we will make turn our directory into an .iso file with a magic genisoimage command, like this,
Code:
herman@red:~$ genisoimage -R -b boot/grub/stage2_eltorito  \
-input-charset iso8859-1  \
-V "SUPERGPARTPUPPY"  \
-no-emul-boot \
-boot-load-size 4 -boot-info-table -o 
supergpartpuppy.iso supergpartpuppy
That command will creat a new .iso file called supergpartpuppy.iso

And finally, we can put a blank CD-RW disk in the CD drive, or one that doesn't contain anything important that we'll ever need.
Then we right click on the new supergpartpuppy.iso file and click 'write to disk'.

When your new CD is made, reboot and try it out!   :)


NOTE:
If you are at the Main Menu and then you choose GParted-Clonezilla, you will get the GParted- Clonezilla menu which is very big and long. There are 24 options there, but you can only see half of them. Since you can't see the whole list at once, you need to scroll down with your arrow keys to see remaining options. There are some good options there like load GParted LiveCD in RAM and run from there, and the titles to select for Clonezilla, that you wouldn't want to miss.  So remember to scroll down and take a look around on that whole menu.

TIP:
Both GParted LiveCD and Clonezilla have options to run in your RAM if you want them to, like Puppy Linux. That means you can eject the CD after one of those is running and free your CD or DVD drive for something else if you need to.

CAUTION:
There are powerful heavy duty professional quality softwares in this CD.
These softwares are not toys and should be used with proper care and respect.