Newsletter of the

Species Orchid Society of

Western Australia (Inc)

Vol 30 No 11

April

2019

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2019

DECEMBER 19
NOVEMBER 19
OCTOBER 19
SEPTEMBER 19
AUGUST 19
JULY 19
JUNE 19
MAY 19
APRIL 19
MARCH 19
FEBRUARY 19
JANUARY 19

2018

DECEMBER 18
NOVEMBER 18
OCTOBER 18
SEPTEMBER 18
AUGUST 18
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JUNE 18
MAY 18
APRIL 18 MARCH 18
FEBRUARY 18

JANUARY 18

2017

DECEMBER 17
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JANUARY 17

2016

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JANUARY 16

2015

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FEBRUARY 15

2014
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FEBRUARY 14

2013
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2012
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FEBRUARY 12

2011
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NOVEMBER 11
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AUGUST 11
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FEBRUARY 11

2010

DECEMBER 10
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JUNE 10
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APRIL 10
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FEBRUARY 10

2009
NOVEMBER 09
OCTOBER 09
SEPTEMBER 09

AUGUST 09
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MAY 09
APRIL 09
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FEBRUARY 09
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2008
NOVEMBER 08
OCTOBER 08
SEPTEMBER 08
AUGUST 08
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MAY 08
APRIL 08

MARCH 08
FEBRUARY 08
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2007
NOVEMBER 07
OCTOBER 07
SEPTEMBER 07
AUGUST 07
JULY 07
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MAY 07

Members of Note
Quiet Achievers
&
Life Members

Members Orchid Collections

Members can have pictures of their orchid collection posted here. Just email Tony

Michael Zink's Orchids

Brassavola nodosa

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Orchid Articles

Paul Carver's
Angreaceum
sesquipedale

Anne O'Callaghan Cultural Award:

Awarded to Charly & Gerda for a large specimen of Bulbophyllum burfordiense

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NEXT MEETING - TUESDAY 9th April @ 7.45
AT WILSON COMMUNITY HALL
,
Braibrise Rd, WILSON

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Editor e-mail: - Ph/Fax: 9296 1765

On-line Membership Form PDF or WORD

Download; Plant Display Template

Species Orchid Society Rules PDF

Inter Society Orchid Display & Workshop
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MINUTES OF THE GENERAL MEETING

12 March 2019 7.45pm
Present: 41 members as per register.
Apologies: Victor, Chris & Lynne.
Visitors: Vanessa
New members: nil
Minutes: Minutes February meeting accepted (Ken, Chris)
Business Arising: Nil

Raffle: Frankie, Chris, Helen, Bruce, Lina.
Name Badge: Graham & Margaret

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Siva's Orchids


Catasetum fimbriatum


Miltonia moreliana


Panarica brassavolae


Thecopus alata

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FORTH-COMING EVENTS
Home visits:
At 10 am on the Sunday after the fourth Thursday of each month. Please bring chairs and food to share.


28 April - Ken & Chris, Henley Brook
26 May - Peter, Armadale
30 June - Ray, Bullsbrook.

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Charly & Gerda's Orchids

Bulbophyllum amplebracteatum


Bulbophyllum burfordiense


Bulbophyllum macrobulbon

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FOR SALE/WANTED
Victor wants to acquire a plant of Rhynchostele rossii and is also interested in small Angraecoid species. If you have spare plants, please contact Victor on 9243 1843 or e-mail vnquin@gmail.com

Lynn wants to acquire plants of Oncidium (Odontoglossum) naevium, and Dendrobium aggregatum (lindleyii) and farmeri if you have a spare plant. She is also collecting wine/champagne corks if you have any that you do not want. Please phone Lynn on 0414 922 923 or e-mail contrarymiss@hotmail.com

Nahiid is looking for plants of Phalaenopsis gigantea, Phalaenopsis hieroglyphica and Phalaenopsis bellina. If you have any spare plants of these species, please phone
Nahiid on 0415 818 850 or e-mail her at

N.Stephens@murdoch.edu.au

Harry is hoping to acquire a plant of Epidendrum densiflorum. If you have a spare division, please call Harry on 0412 403 696 or e-mail
harry.ashton@live.com.au

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Correspondence:
Inwards:
Orchids WA (Special GM on the 6th of April),
Orchid Digest (renewal),
GCA (Feb bulletin and Wednesday 17th of April meeting in Lesmurdie),
Lee-Anne (membership cheque),
ISODW fact sheets from Albany ( see a committee member for copies),
Bruce (WOC 23 meeting, 7th April at the Bentley Community Centre).
Outwards:
Nil

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A message from The Water Corporation

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The difference between

Phalaenopsis amabilis & Phal. aphrodite subsp. formosana

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General Business:

1. Membership is due.
2. We will need a new secretary in May.
3. Please continue to donate plants for our raffles.
4. ISODW in Albany on the 3rd & 4th of August. Payments for the Bus Trip and the Dinner to be made to our Treasurer. Clive Halls of Beenak Orchids will give two presentations.
5. Orders close tonight for society logo, jackets and shirts.
6. Orchids WA update. A special general meeting is to be held for delegates on the 6th of April. Also negotiations are continuing about biosecurity with Canberra and with the State Minister for Agriculture.
7. All members are invited to the second WOC meeting on the 7th of April at the Bentley Community Centre on Sunday the 7th of April

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Ken & Chris's Orchids

Anacheilium radiatum
Brasiliorchis schunkeana


Cattleya bicolor


Christensonia vietnamica

Dendrochilum latifolium var. macranthum


Dendrochilum sp. (unknown)

Phalaenopsis pulchra


Phalaenopsis violacea

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WA terrestrial orchids in situ – a four-day field trip to the Mid-west

http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/Orchids_in_The_Mid-west.htm

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The Genus Dendrobium

Contd from last month

Dendrobium senile Parish ex Rchb.f 1865 SECTION Formosae comes from Myanmar, Thailand and Laos where is can be found as miniature, warm to cool growing epiphyte at 500-1,200m. It has distinctive sub erect, reclining to creeping, hairy, succulent-like pseudobulbs and with 2-6, ovate-lanceolate, alternate, semi-deciduous leaves. Flowering in spring and summer, the lemon fragrant one to several flowers are borne on short inflorescences that arise from the upper nodes of the leafed and leafless canes. Its common name is the White Haired Dendrobium, while in Thailand, it is known as Ueang chani. This species is known to be difficult to maintain over time in cultivation


Photo source:


Synonyms in use are Callista senilis (Parish & Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Callista senilis (Parish & Rchb. f.) Brieger 1981

Dendrobium senile in situ Thailand
Photo source:

 

Dendrobium trigonopus Rchb. f. 1887 SECTION Formosae
This small sized, hot to cool growing epiphyte is found in Myanmar, Thailand, southwestern China, Laos and Vietnam in remnant forests on tree trunks at 300-1,500m. It has tufted, fusiform, sulcate, shiny purplish brown, stems carrying 1 to 4, subterminal, ligulate or oblong, thick, papery, dull green, acute leaves. Flowering late winter and early spring, 1-4 waxy, long lasting, fragrant flowers with minute bracts are borne on very short racemes that arise from the nodes near the apex of both leafy and leafless canes. This species has also proven difficult to maintain in cultivation.

Photo source:

Dendrobium trigonopus in situ
Photo source:

Its common name is the Triangular Column Foot Dendrobium. In Thailand, it is known as Kam Pak Gai - Ueang kham liam (translated - the Golden Chicken's Beak Orchid). In China, it is known as Chi Geng Shi Hu. Synonyms in use are Callista trigonopus (Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium velutinum Rolfe 1895

Dendrobium wattii (Hook. F) Rchb.f 1882 SECTION Formosae
Found as an epiphyte in dense forests on tree trunks at 1,500-2,600 m from China, Myanmar, northern Thailand, northwest India, northern Laos and Vietnam China through Burma and northern Laos, it is another member of the nigro-hirsute (black haired) section of Dendrobium and is noted for its long-lasting flowers. It is a miniature to medium sized, cool to cold growing epiphyte with slender, cylindrical canes carrying 4 to 8, narrowly linear, leathery leaves with the leaf sheaths having fine black hairs. Blooming in the spring on short inflorescences arising near the apex of leafless canes, short racemes carry 2 to 3 flowers. The leafless canes rebloom for several years.

Photos source:
Its common name is Watt's Dendrobium after an English botanist and orchid collector in India in the late1800's. In China, it is known as Gao Shan Shi Hu. Synonyms in use are Callista wattii (Hook.f.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium cariniferum var. wattii Hkr.f; Dendrobium congianum Aver.2016; Dendrobium evrardii Gagnep. 1930

In situ photo by Peter Williams

 

 


Dendrobium williamsonii J. Day & Rchb. f. 1869 SECTION Formosae
This species is also in the nigro-hirsute group and is found in the Chinese Himalayas, Assam India, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam in forests on tree trunks at 600-1,400m as a small sized, warm to cool growing epiphyte. It has upright, elongate-fusiform, velvety stems that are many leafed towards the apex carrying, oblong or lanceolate, velvety, obscurely bilobed apically leaves with leaf sheaths that are densely covered with black hairs. Flowering in the late winter and early spring, 1-3 waxy, fragrant flowers are borne on very short, black hairy racemes that arise from near the apex of the newest maturing cane.

Photo source:
Its common name is Williamson's Dendrobium named after an English orchid collector in India in the 1800's. In China, it is known as Hei Mao Shi Hu. Synonyms in use are Callista lubbersiana (Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Callista williamsonii (J. Day & Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium lubbersianum Rchb.f 1882

In situ photo source:


General Culture Notes for Section Formosae species
As noted earlier, Dendrobium species in section Formosae have a deserved reputation for being difficult to grow and sustain over the long term in cultivation. However, some growers do not share this experience and it is due to their understanding of the natural environment and habitat from which the species originates. This generally involves a resting period where the species should be kept drier, although this rule does not apply to all species in the section. Generally, this drier period occurs in their natural habitat in winter, so these species need protection from winter rainfall, and will benefit from some warmth as winter in their habitat during local winter will be dry, but not cold and dark as can be experiences in Western Australia. The majority of species in this section are epiphytes, so can be grown in media in pots, or if you are able to maintain humidity in summer, on slab mounts. The media should be able to hold sufficient moisture between watering to prevent the plant from becoming dehydrated, but not stay soggy. Remember, the majority of this section's species are epiphytes and their roots are exposed to air and completely dry between rain periods. You will find that as your plants grow new canes; most often the active roots will be outside the pot in the air. Therefore, if you are growing in a container, the media should allow the free movement of air through the container. Choose a media of consistent size (larger media for species with larger roots, small media for species with very fine roots). If it is part of your orchid culture, you could include perlite or styrofoam/polystyrene to provide air spaces. Generally Dendrobium species prefer slightly acid media about pH 6.7. All of this is important as the species in this section are susceptible to root loss if the media breaks down and stays wet, is affected by salt build-up, or is invaded by weeds and/or fungal or bacterial pathogens.


SECTION Latouria
The fifty or so species in section Latouria are primarily found in New Guinea, although some members are found in the Philippines and Samoa. They are principally epiphytic and can be found from sea level to high altitude, usually in areas of high, year-round rainfall. The flowers are long lasting, and range from small to relatively large with the latter being popular for hybridisation. Early collection and identification of these species from the wild means that artificially propagated plants of the more showy species are readily available at reasonable prices. These less well-known species often come from very inaccessible habitats that are difficult to replicate, and are therefore uncommon in collections. Some of the more frequently available species in this section are:
Dendrobium aberrans
Dendrobium alexandrae
Dendrobium atroviolaceum
Dendrobium bifalce
Dendrobium convolutum
Dendrobium engae
Dendrobium eximium
Dendrobium finisterrae
Dendrobium forbesii
Dendrobium johsoniae
Dendrobium macrophyllum
Dendrobium polysema
Dendrobium punamense
Dendrobium rhodostictum
Dendrobium shiraishii
Dendrobium spectabile
Dendrobium tapiniense


Dendrobium aberrans Schltr. 1912 SECTION Latouria
This is a mini-miniature to miniature sized, hot to cool growing epiphyte from eastern Papua New Guinea where it grows on tree fern and shady tree trunks in mossy forests at 300-1,900m. It has clustered, spherical to spindle-shaped, purple, olive-yellow or glossy green pseudobulbs with 3 to 4 nodes below oval, leathery, spreading, 2 to 3 apical leaves. Flowering throughout the year, short, wiry, erect or pendant inflorescences arising from the apex of old and new canes carry 2 to 6 white often marked with pink on the column flowers in a cluster. The flowers are long-lasting, are sometimes fragrant and can be produced on very small plants.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo source:

 

 

 

 


Dendrobium aberrans on slab mount
Photo source:


Its common name is the Deviating Dendrobium, and the synonym in use is Sayeria aberrans (Schltr.) Rauschert 1983.

Dendrobium alexandrae Schltr. 1912 SECTION Latouria
Found in Papua New Guinea as a medium to large sized, cool growing epiphyte on high branches of moss-covered trees in lower montane and cool mist forests at 900-1,200m in high light, exposed positions. Andre Millar says that often she found this species in the highest trees in the forest. The canes carry 2 to 3 apical, elliptic, bluish-green, erect or spreading leaves. Autumn flowering occurs on axillary, racemose, laxly, several flowered inflorescences arising from the nodes at the apex of the pseudobulb. The flowers are predominantly white with heavy spotting on the sepals and petals with a large pronounced lip coloured red and green. This species was once thought to be lost, or perhaps a hybrid of Dendrobium spectabile, but fortunately, recent rediscovery of substantial populations in some locations has revealed that this is not so.

 

 

Photo source:


Its common name is Alexandra's Dendrobium named after Schlechter's wife. Synonyms in use are Latourea alexandrae [Schltr.] Breiger 1981; Latourorchis alexandre [Schltr.] Breiger 1981; Sayeria alexandrae (Schltr.) Rauschert 1983

Contd next month

See the full article (so far) HERE

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Harry's Orchids


Vanda falcata (formerly Neofinetia falcata)

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NOTES FROM YOUR COMMITTEE

1. As discussed at our past monthly meetings, we need a volunteer to take on the position of Secretary at our AGM in May. If you want to know more about what is involved, please ask.


2. The next workshop on World Orchid Conference planning will be held at Bentley Community Centre. Nyamup Way, Bentley (just off Manning Road) at 9.00am-12.00noon on Sunday 7th April 2019. Please bring a plate to share for morning tea.


3. Mt Beenak Orchids will be attending the ISODW in Albany as a vendor and speaker. As August is their busiest month with two major orchid fairs in the Eastern States, Clive will only bring perhaps only 200 plants to sell at the event. To ensure that members are able to get the plants they want, he recommends that we pre-order and he will send the plants to us. As encouragement, he will cover the cost of insecticide and pathogen treatment, and share freight costs. Plants on the list at their website https://mtbeenakorchids.com. are available, although some (particularly species) are in limited quantities.


4. Clive has asked me to get an order to him as soon as possible so that he can send plants before Easter as he will be overseas for a few weeks after then. If you are interested and wish to order, please advise Ken by phone or e-mail.


5. Annual membership renewals were due in February. Please pay the Treasurer. Payment can be made by EFT to the Species Orchid Society account at Bendigo Bank, BSB 633-000 Account number 122491988. Please include your surname in the transfer.


6. Mich is hoping that the apparel will be available for distribution to members at the April general meeting

7. If you haven't ordered your new badge yet, please see Mich. The cost for badges with a magnetic clip is $13.50, and with pin is $11.50.

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Unusual and Surprising Orchids and their
Reproductive Biology
by Ken Jones

Cont. next month

See the whole article (so far) HERE

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MONTHLY PLANT
Dendrobium loddigesii

Difficulty: Once this species grows into a large plant, it is relatively easy to grow and flower
Description: small sized epiphyte, lithophyte or terrestrial
Country of origin: Laos, Vietnam, China and Hong Kong


Photo source:

Cost: $10.00

Dendrobium loddigesii Rolfe 1887 SECTION Dendrobium is a miniature to small sized, cool growing epiphyte, lithophyte or terrestrial. Thanks to Peter for finding and purchasing these plants on our behalf from several Bunnings stores.


It is found in humid, mossy, mixed and coniferous forests at 1,000 - 1,500m. It has tufted, pendant, sub terete, striated, several noded, white sheathed stems carrying alternate, fleshy, oblong, acute leaves and experiences a dry cooler winter and a warmer wet spring and summer.
Flowering in Spring, long-lasting, fragrant flowers arise on short single flowered inflorescences at the nodes of leafless canes.


Some forms with variegated foliage have been discovered and are now being propagated for commercial sale. It appears that this species was well known in cultivation for many years before its natural occurrence habitat was discovered and it was described and identified. Apparently, it is easily propagated from stem growths.


As a small sized species that tends to grow into a mass of plant material, care needs to be taken to ensure that there is plentiful air movement to minimise the risk of scale and mealy bug infestation that might not be readily observable. This species can be grown in a pot, or on a slab mount if you are able to provide humidity in summer. It will require protection from cold winds and winter rain.

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Peter's Orchids

Aerangis mystacidii


Brassavola nodosa var. dawsonii


Dendrobium bigibbum fma. compactum


Encyclia cordigera


Phalaenopsis gigantea


Psychopsis krameriana


Psychopsis papilio

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Orchids in Their Natural Habitat and in Cultivation -
Ecuagenera's five-day pre-WOC tour

See the full article HERE

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Fiona Stanley Hospital Site Terrestrial Orchids

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Hygienic Practice

The benefits of hygienic practice in keeping your collection free of plant diseases.

Hygiene tips to keep your orchids disease free.

Checklist in WORD in PDF

See the full article HERE

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Financial Report: Tabled by Adrian. Current balance $11,297.71 (Ken, Margaret.)

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Tony & Mavis's Orchids

Brassovola nodosa


Phalaenopsis deliciosa


Tolumnia variegata

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STANHOPEAS by Bill Mather & Ken Jones

See the article HERE

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As usual, any and all comments are welcome

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