Newsletter of the

Species Orchid Society of

Western Australia (Inc)

Vol 30 No3

August

2018

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Editor e-mail: - Ph/Fax: 9296 1765

On-line Membership Form PDF or WORD

Download; Plant Display Template

Species Orchid Society Rules PDF

Inter Society Orchid Display & Workshop

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NEXT MEETING - Tuesday 14th August @ 7.45
AT WILSON COMMUNITY HALL
,
Braibrise Rd, WILSON

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Anne O'Callaghan Cultural Award:

Awarded to Norm for Maxillaria sophronitis.
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MINUTES OF THE GENERAL MEETING August 2018
Present: 40 present as per the register.
Apologies: 4 as per register
Visitors: Roger.
New members: Nil.
Minutes: Minutes June meeting
accepted (Ken, Lynn )
Business Arising: Nil

Correspondence:
Inwards:
GCA - AGM notices,
Jane Charles - Bunbury OS,
SEOS of WA - State Orchid Championship,
AOF newsletter,
QLD Native Orchid News (May and June),
Confirmation of the Lotterywest grant and its conditions
Outwards:
Nil.

Raffle: Nahiid, Paul, John, Lina and Bruce
Name Badge: Clive

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HOT OFF THE PRESSES (as they used to say)

Here are a couple of pix from the Inter Society Orchid Display & Workshop from Bruce

Part of the Display by the Species Orchid Society of WA

The other part. Both combined to win the display prize

And the display by the Paphiopedilum Study Group

(OK so there are three pix. So bite me!!)

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Lyn (presented Lynn )


Encyclia boothiana


Prosthechea cochleata var. alba

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FORTH-COMING EVENTS

Home visits:
At 10 am on the Sunday after the fourth Thursday of each month. Please bring chairs and food to share.


26th August - Lina, North Perth.
30 September - Maxine, Parkerville.
28 October - Kirsty, East Victoria Park.
25 November - Lynn, Belmont

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Graham & Margaret's Orchids


Bonatea speciosa


Laelia anceps


Prasophyllum parvifolium


Pterostylis nana


Pterostylis hamiltonii


Pterostylis vittata


Stenorrhynchos speciosum

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FOR SALE/WANTED

Victor wants to acquire a plant of Rhynchostele rossii and is also interested in small Aerangis species. If you have spare plants, please contact Victor on 9243 1843 or e-mail vnquin@gmail.com.

 

Lynn wants to acquire a plant of Oncidium (Odontoglossum) naevium if you have a spare plant.
Please phone Lynn on 0414 922 923 or e-mail contrarymiss@hotmail.com.

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Ken & Chris's Orchids

Brasiliorchis schunkeana


Dendrobium spp. aff. wattii


Dendrochilum convallariaeforme


Laelia anceps


Oerstedella centradenia


Pleurothallis saundersiana

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A message from The Water Corporation

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The difference between

Phalaenopsis amabilis & Phal. aphrodite subsp. formosana

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WA terrestrial orchids in situ – a four-day field trip to the Mid-west

http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/Orchids_in_The_Mid-west.htm

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Clive's Orchids


Diplodium repandum

Pterostylis concava

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NOTES FROM YOUR COMMITTEE

1. If you have plants for our display at ISODW, or for sale, please ensure that they are not watered on the Friday or Saturday morning. Our display has been cleverly designed so that it does not require black plastic film underneath, but we do not want orchid pots to be wet.

2. Morley Sport and Recreation Centre, Wellington Street, Morley have advised that as the venue has not been booked on Friday 3 August, it is now available to allow set up to commence on Friday Members can bring in their plants, sale plants etc. and construct displays between 4.00pm and 8.00pm.
3. We will be treated to a visiting speaker at our next meeting. Jim and Thea Shaughnessy will be here for ISODW and will come to let us know how he grows species orchids, particularly Sarcochilus. Jim will show us photos of his plants.

4. The Spring Orchid Fair will be staged on the weekend 15-16 Sept., (set up on Fri 14th evening) at Aranmore college in Leederville. SOSWA is one of the four societies jointly staging this event. If you wish to sell orchid plants at this event, please see Ken or Charly.

5. If you haven't ordered your new badge yet, please see Mich. The cost for badges with a magnetic clip is $13.50, and with pin is $11.50.

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Unusual and Surprising Orchids and their
Reproductive Biology
by Ken Jones

Cont. next month

See the whole article (so far) HERE

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Peter's Orchids


Dendrobium goldschmidtianum


Haraella retrocalla


Jumellea major


Laelia anceps 'Veitchiana'


Laelia praestans

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MONTHLY PLANT
Laelia purpurata ’Double alba'
Description: Medium-large vigorous autumn-spring flowering unifoliate Laelia
Country of origin: Brazil
Difficulty: Very easy to grow and flower in a shadehouse with winter protection.


Photo source:
Cost: $10.00
Laelia purpurata Lindley 1852-3 comes from central and southern Brazil from
Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Santa Caterina and Rio Grande do Sul.
Laelia purpurata is the national flower of Brazil.
This medium sized, hot to cool growing species occurs as a unifoliate epiphyte high in the canopy on wooded hillsides .
It grows to 60cm tall, and generally flowers from Autumn – Spring. A well grown plant can have up to seven flowers that can be up to 20 cm across.
This species does not require a rest period, so needs to be kept moist, but not wet during our cold, wet winter months. During the warmer months, this vigorous species appreciates regular fertilising and will reward the grower with more and larger flowers.
As this species grows quite tall, a larger pot is recommended with pine bark or other similar media., and when plants are larger, blue metal or similar in the bottom. They will also grow on wooden slab mounts provided you are able to maintain humidity during summer.
The principal insect pest affecting this genus in collections is cotton scale, usually due to poor air movement. Other than this pest, Laelia species are hardy, and easy to grow and flower.
There is an excellent on-line article about Laelia purpurata that is well worth reading.

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Harry's Orchid
Brassavola subulifolia

Epidendrum elongatum

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Orchids in Their Natural Habitat and in Cultivation -
Ecuagenera's five-day pre-WOC tour

See the full article HERE

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Siva's Orchids

Dendrochilum irigense


Epigeneium cymbidioides


Laelia blumenscheini

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Ian's Orchid


Laelia anceps 'Disciplinata HCC/AOS' x 'SVO Flair'


Pterostylis vittata var. sanguinea

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Why is this flower an Orchid?
Reprinted with permission of the author, Noel Grant and Townsville Orchid Society
Orchids belong to the smaller of the two great groups of flowering plants - the monocotyledons (or monocots), which include lilies, orchids, palms and grasses. The larger group contains the dicotyledons (the dicots). The majority of common garden plants, most trees and broad-leafed flowering plants, such as roses and geraniums, are dicots.
Monocots are distinguished by having only one seed leaf in the embryo contained in the seed (dicots have two). Most of you will have grown peas or beans (which are dicots) at some time, and I am sure you all remember those two leaves breaking the ground surface as the young plants sprouted.
Monocots typically also have flower parts, such as sepals and petals, based on a plan of three (imagine a typical orchid flower), whereas dicots have parts based on a plan of four or five (or multiples thereof). Most monocots have leaves with parallel veins, while dicots usually have a meshlike pattern. The stems of monocots do not have a continuous cambium layer, or region of new growth, so they do not increase in stem thickness, produce annual growth rings or have woody stems, as do typical trees, which are dicots.
The primary characters that distinguish the orchids as a group are found in the flower.
At the bottom of an unspecialized non-orchid flower is the stem that supports it, called the pedicel. Directly above, and at the base of the flower itself, is a whorl of green, leaflike organs called sepals. Above and inside the sepals is a second whorl of coloured petals. These are the asexual parts ("asexual" means NOT sexual) and they are developed to protect the flower or to attract a pollinator. Inside (also arranged in whorls) are the sexual portions of the flower. First are the male stamens, which consist of a filament (the slender stalk that supports the anther) and an anther (usually an arrangement of four sacs filled with loose pollen grains). There may be several whorls of stamens. In the centre of the flower is the female pistil, which is composed of an
enlarged portion (the ovary) topped by a stalklike style with a stigma at its apex. The pollen in the anther is powdery and is usually carried from the anther of one flower to the stigma of another flower by a pollinating agent (moth, fly, bird etc.).

The usual orchid flower is also supported on a pedicel. The ovary, however, with its ovules, seems to be an integral part of the pedicel because it is embedded within the upper portion of the pedicel below the attachments of the petals. The orchid flower is thus said to have an inferior ovary. The sepals and petals are usually similar, often highly coloured, and in sets of three. One petal is developed as a landing platform for the pollinator and is called the lip (or labellum). Most orchids can be divided by a line from the top of the dorsal sepal to the centre of the lip, where the portion of the flower on the left side of the line can be seen as a mirror image of the right side. This is described as making the flower bilaterally symmetrical.
The sexual portions of the orchid flower are quite different from other generalized flowers. All of the male organs and the female organs (the filaments, anthers, style, and stigma) are reduced in number and are usually fused into a single structure called the column. Most orchids have a single anther at the apex of the column. The pollen grains are bound together with a sticky substance in masses called pollinia. As a visiting insect backs out of the flower, the pollinia are picked up from the anther and stick to the body of the insect.
One of the characteristic differences between the orchid family and other advanced monocots is that the fertile stamen or stamens are all on one side of the flower opposite the lip.
The lip is oriented upward in the bud, but as it later develops, twisting takes place in the pedicel or ovary so that the lip is usually oriented downward by the time the flower opens, a process called resupination. The lip becomes a handy landing platform for pollinators.
Orchid seeds are extremely small and contain an embryo that lacks endosperm (starchy nutrient tissue). In nature, orchid seeds need the presence of a fungal mat called mycorrhiza in order to germinate. Happily, a method has been found in the laboratory where seeds can be germinated without the fungus, which is why so many orchid seedlings are now available.
It is interesting that all the special characters of orchid flowers, such as the joining of the male and female organs to form the column, the masses of pollen called pollinia, and the tiny seeds without endosperm, are found individually in other groups of flowering plants. However, it is through the combination of all of these characters that we now know the family of flowering plants called the Orchidaceae. Noel Grant


This is a reprint of an article first published in the TOS Bulletin in February 2010.

Now that we know a little more about the characteristics of orchid flowers, it is time to look at some familiar examples, and some that look nothing like the diagrams above. However, they are indeed orchid flowers, each has six segments - three petals and three sepals (although some might be fused together).
Why then are they so different? The answer to this rhetorical question can be found in their unique relationship with their preferred pollinator. Following is just a small sample of the truly unique and fascinating orchid flowers that are at least part of the reason that many of us are fascinated( others might say obsessed) by orchids.
Some of these you will have seen in an earlier article on orchid pollinators, others even I have not seen in pictures or in situ. Australia has some truly unique orchids, highly adapted to specific pollinators and with most unusual flowers. Calenea major, commonly known as the Flying Duck Orchid is pollinated by sawflies and male thynnid wasps that are attracted by a pheromone emitted from the flower similar to that of a female wasp. This
terrestrial species comes from South Eastern Australia.

 


Photo:


Another interesting terrestrial is Habenaria (Pecteilis) radiata found in China, Japan, Korea and Russia. This species is widespread, but is said to be difficult to grow in cultivation which is a pity as it is truly striking orchid.

Photo source:


Members of the Catasetum genus often have different male and female flowers.

 

Catasetum osculatum often has separate racemes of male and female flowers, while other such as Catasetum schunkei have male and female flowers on the same raceme.

 

Other species, will have predominantly male or
female flowers

Photo source:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catasetum schunkei
Photo source:


Early collectors and taxonomists were often so confused by this genetic characteristic that they were often identified as separate species.

 


The genus Masdevallia has flowers that seldom clearly exhibit 3 sepal and petals. In almost all of this genus, the lateral petals and sepals are fused together. Masdevallia lata found from Costa Rica to Panama clearly exhibits this trait


 

Masdevallia lata
Photo source:


In Central and South America, we find many orchids that are highly adapted to their specific pollinators, and consequently, can be confusing for less
experienced orchid growers to identify.

 

 

 

 

 

 


The genus Lepanthes has many small, insignificant but beautiful flowers. Lepanthes caprimulgus below is a miniature species from Ecuador and Peru. The flower is named for its resemblance to the Nightjar (whip-pour-will) bird.


Photo source:


An unusual genus from New Guinea is Mediocalcar decoratum.

This species grows into large mats of plant material and has upturned, cylindrical flowers in which it is somewhat difficult to identify all the flower segments.
Photo source:


 

 

 

 

The genus Pleurothallis has many species found in Central and South America. Generally the insignificant flowers are somewhat difficult to recognise as an orchid. Pleurothallis cyrpidioides found in Ecuador and Peru is one such species.
Photo sources:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The genus Stelis (a member of the Pleurothallidinae family) also has many small flowers that does not look anything like the orchids that we cultivate.

Stelis glomerosa from Ecuador has a 'globe-like' flower that gives rise to its common name, the Ball Stelis. Photo source:


To finish off this brief pictorial review of some unusual orchid flowers, one needs look no further than the genus Bulbophyllum. There are many in this genus that challenge the orthodoxy of three sepals and three petals, one of which is modified to form the labellum.


Bulbophyllum tripudians from China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam in one of several species that have arched flower racemes with flowers that move about with any air movement. Photo source:

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Fiona Stanley Hospital Site Terrestrial Orchids

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Hygienic Practice

The benefits of hygienic practice in keeping your collection free of plant diseases.

Hygiene tips to keep your orchids disease free.

Checklist in WORD in PDF

See the full article HERE

 

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Financial Report:: Tabled by Adrian. Current balance is $14,686.47. (Jaqui, Mavis)

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Tony & Mavis's Orchids

Catasetum oerstedii


Oncidium hyphaematicum


Paphiopedilum spicerianum


Stenorrhynchos speciosum

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STANHOPEAS by Bill Mather & Ken Jones

See the article HERE

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General Business:

* ISODW

* The dinner will have to be cancelled if enough people do not nominate by the end of the week.

* We need people for the setup and breakdown of the display.

*Two people for the raffle at all times.

* Two for the front door at all times.

* Sharon and Janine have volunteered to run the kitchen but they need others to help. Also we need to have donated food for the kitchen.

* The sales table needs people for Sunday 8am to 10am.

* Ken outlined the procedures and
documentation for people selling plants at the sales table.

* Ken appealed for more people to give the names of plants they may be able to display.

* Tony said that there would be two prizes for the raffle.

* Tony outlined a planned trip to the APOC in Kuching in July 2019. It would involve some Sumatran sightseeing prior and last 2 to 3 weeks @ about $2500 to $3500. About thirty members expressed an interest in going.

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Norm's Orchids


Epidendrum floribundum


Epidendrum elongatum


Maxillaria sophronitis

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As usual, any and all comments are welcome

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Members of Note
Quiet Achievers
&
Life Members

Members Orchid Collections

Members can have pictures of their orchid collection posted here. Just email Tony

Michael Zink's Orchids

Brassavola nodosa

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Orchid Articles

Paul Carver's
Angreaceum
sesquipedale