Newsletter of the

Species Orchid Society of

Western Australia (Inc)

Vol 29 No3

August 2017

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Editor e-mail: - Ph/Fax: 9296 1765

On-line Membership Form PDF or WORD

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Members of Note
Quiet Achievers
&
Life Members

Members Orchid Collections

Members can have pictures of their orchid collection posted here. Just email Tony

Michael Zink's Orchids

Brassavola nodosa

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Orchid Articles

Paul Carver's
Angreaceum
sesquipedale

Download; Plant Display Template

The Anne O'Callaghan Cultural Award:

Awarded to Siva for his plant of Gongora rufescens

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NEXT MEETING - TUESDAY 8th August 2017 @ 7.45
AT WILSON COMMUNITY HALL
,
Braibrise Rd, WILSON

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GENERAL MEETING - 11 June 2017, 7.50pm
Present: 37 present as per the register
Apologies: 3 as per register
Visitors: Nil
New members: Jo .
Minutes: Minutes of the June meeting
accepted (Jacqui, Lynne)
Business Arising: Nil

Raffle: Ian, Ian, Maxine, Murray, Ken, Tara, Lina & Courtney.
Name Badge: Sue.

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FORTH-COMING EVENTS

Home visits:
At 10 am on the Sunday after the fourth Thursday of each month. Please bring chairs and food to share.


27 August - Rod and Heather, Woodvale
1 October - Graham & Margaret, Hamersley
29 October -Lynne, Eden Hill
26 November -Charly & Gerda, Sinagra

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Siva's Orchids


Comparettia speciosa


Dinema polybulbon


Gongora rufescens


Masdevallia mejiana


Prosthechea boothiana

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A message from The Water Corporation

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The difference between

Phalaenopsis amabilis & Phal. aphrodite subsp. formosana

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Peter's Orchids

Comparettia coccinea


Laelia anceps var. veitchiana

 


Paphiopedilum insigne


Paphiopedilum insigne var sanderae

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Correspondence:

WAOS final letter,
WAOS Bulletin #6,
GCA Bulletin
AOC renewal of membership ($100),
Native Orchid News for July,
Notice of Special Resolution for the 8th August GM.


Outwards:
Nil.

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MONTHLY PLANT

Oeceoclades spathulifera


Difficulty: Winter protection.
Description: Terrestrial species that is grown for the attractively patterned leaves

Country of origin: Madagascar

Cost: $12.00


This month's plant is Oeceoclades spathulifera that was purchased from Tinonee Orchids and has been grown on by Peter.
Oeceoclades spathulifera (H.Perrier) Garay & P.Taylor 1976 (the genus name is pronounced ee-see-oh-klah-deez) is a species from in north-western Madagascar, where is grows in seasonally dry sandy forests and on coastal dunes over limestone at 30-900m. This area is covered with montane woodlands.
Oeceoclades spathulifera is a medium sized, warm growing terrestrial with subterranean, flattened, ovoid pseudobulbs carrying 2 to 3, elliptic-linear, green with darker green-blackish spotted leave. The flowers that appear in late spring and early summer on an erect, basal, simple, several flowered inflorescence are insignificant and the species is principally grown for its attractively patterned foliage as its common name the Shining Spots Oeceoclades indicates.
As it is a terrestrial species, it is best grown in a terrestrial mix. This could be premium quality potting mix, sphagnum moss, perlite, or coarse sand or some hydroponic media.
This species will grow in our conditions outside a glasshouse, but I believe will need winter protection as the western side of Madagascar is dry (and hot in summer) compared with the eastern seaboard and central plateau rainforest.

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NOTES FROM YOUR COMMITTEE

1. By the time that we meet on Tuesday 8 August, the WA Orchid Spectacular will be over. The enthusiastic support of Western Australian orchid growers and interstate and overseas registrants and vendors, and by the general public is appreciated. Thank you to all our members who helped out over the weekend, and helped us create another memorable display.

2. The Spring Orchid Show will take place at Cannington on 26 and 27 August. We will be putting on a display using the props from WAOS. Please let Ken know if you are have any plants that might be in flower for the display. Set up will be Friday 25th AUG from 9:00am, then open to the Public from 9:00am - 5:00pm Saturday 26th. And 9:00am - 3:00pm Sunday 27th Aug.


3. Members that wish to sell plants can do so. Ken will be managing this and you need to contact Ken if you wish to participate. A 10% commission will be charged to cover the Species Society contribution to the cost of staging the show.



4. If you haven't ordered your new badge yet, please see Mich. The cost for badges with a magnetic clip is $13.50, and with pin is $11.50.

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Unusual and Surprising Orchids and their
Reproductive Biology
by Ken Jones

 

The Mediterranean terrestrial species Orchis simia and Orchis italica also resemble monkeys, although are more reminiscent of naked hanging little men. The appearance is of cute little bodies hanging from the flowers, which are usually grey, white, pink, purple or reddish.


Photo source:


Orchis simia was first discovered in France in 1779 and can be found from southern England down to northern Africa and as far east as Iran.
It used to be a common orchid in UK but widespread clearing and de-vegetation since 1920 have made it much rarer and difficult to find.
It is a perennial and flowers from May until June each year. Like many of our Australian terrestrial orchids, it has two oval tubers from which its genus name orchis from the orchidaceae family is derived. In Greek, orchis is the word for testicle.
Now, it is only known from two locations in Kent and two sites in Oxfordshire. It was common in the Thames Valley about 150 years ago. Fortunately, Orchid italica is still widespread in the Mediterranean countries.


Pecteilis radiata, [Thunb.] Raf. 1836 (syn Habenaria radiata) is found in China, Japan, Korea and Russia in forest glades at 1,500 m as a small to medium sized, erect, cold growing terrestrial with small, ovoid or ellipsoid tubers.
It is known by the common name the White Egret Orchid and as the Fringed Orchid, Crane Orchid or Sagiso and is one of the most well known Japanese species. It has up to 3 showy white flowers as the photo on the following page illustrates The flowers are up to 4cm across.


Unfortunately, Pecteilis radiata has become endangered in the wild due to habitat destruction, and is not easy to grow in captivity.

 

Photo source:


Fortunately, it can still be found in the private orchid collector's gardens, and in some non-urbanised mountain areas over 500m as well as in protected Japanese bogs where people are allowed to view the flowers.
A number of variegated leaf forms are in production. Some have white margins on the leaves while others have variegated leaves with yellow/green variegation. There is also a peloric flower form with the cultivar name 'Hishou' in Japanese. In this instance, the peloric form has the petals replaced by a further two labellums creating a stunning symmetrical flower. This cultivar is rarely seen outside Japan, and the species itself demands special conditions and attention if mature flowering plants are to survive in cultivation for more than one or two seasons. Fortunately due to the liberal production of new tubers each season, the number of plants is easy to increase.

 


Photo source:


Caleana major R Bria a unique Australian species from Queensland to Tasmania. As the photo on the following page demonstrates, it strongly resembles a duck in flight.
It is widespread and common, and forms sparse vegetative colonies in open forest and heathland on gravel or sandy soil. Pollination is undertaken by male sawflies that attempt to mate with the labellum, another instance of pseudocopulation in endemic Australian species.
This and the following species rely on the beneficial association with a very specific mycorrhizal fungi often found with Australian terrestrial orchids.



Photo source:


Paracaleana minor ( R.Br. ) Blaxell 1972 (formerly Caleana minor) is known as the small duck orchid and has up to seven flowers on each raceme. It shares habitat with and resembles the somewhat larger Caleana major. However, these plants are seldom noticed because of their small size.
The habitat occupied by this species varies between open rocky areas on sloping ground. Generally, it is found with other grasses and smaller trees.

 

Photo source:


In common with Caleana major it is often found growing at the base of eucalyptus trees, and its flower too is structured for insect pollination, although some populations produce viable asexually set seed.
In Western Australia, we find the Hammer Orchids. The genus Drakaea, all species of which are endemic to Western Australia use pheromones and mimicry to attract their Thynnine wasp pollinators. What is even more incredible is that each of the nine or so species has a one-to-one relationship with a particular Thynnine wasp species.
All are to some degree endangered by habitat destruction that affects their pollinators which too are often highly localised populations. The orchid emits a pheromone that is similar to that of the female wasp, and when the male wasp attempts to mate with it, the hinged labellum pivots and brings the male wasp into contact with pollinia and stigmatic surface.


Drakaea thynniphila

Photo source:


Cont. next month

See the whole article (so far) HERE

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Fiona Stanley Hospital Site Terrestrial Orchids

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Tony & Sandy 's Orchids


Dendrobium bigibbum var. compactum


Paphiopedilum spicerianum

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Hygienic Practice

The benefits of hygienic practice in keeping your collection free of plant diseases.

Hygiene tips to keep your orchids disease free.

Checklist in WORD in PDF

See the full article HERE

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Treasurers Report - Charly provided the financial report. Current balance is $5,438.04 plus $6,000 in a term deposit. (Ken, Tony)

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Ken & Chris's Orchids

Barkeria whartoniana


Bulbophyllum spp


Dendrochilum cobbianum


Dendrochilum convallariaeforme


Paphiopedilum spicerianum


Paphiopedilum tranlienianum


Restrepia cymbula

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Imported plant news


Our quarantine facility is now closed. Further imports of plants will now need to be flasks or plants from the Eastern States and local nurseries.

Ken & Chris

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GENERAL BUSINESS:
1. Ken was congratulated and thanked for the use of his quarantine house and its enormous contribution to our Society.

2. Ken outlined the addition to our new rules (Rule 2) to put in the name of our Society. The members at the August GM will vote on these rules.

Species Orchid Society Rules PDF

3. If you have plants for the WAOS display tell Ken by the 21st of July so that labels can be made.

4. If you are a volunteer you need to be on a roster somewhere. Try to get to the orientation meeting at 6pm on Wednesday the 19th of July.

5. Our trailer will be unloaded at 8am on Friday the 4th of August and we will need a few people to help unload it.

6. Plants for our display can be given to Ken after 9:30am that day. Plants for judging need to be there at 8am.

7. The photo competition closes on the 14th of July.

8. A letter needs to be written to the AOC to show our support for Grahame Zerbe's nomination for president.

9. Courtney spoke about the Cymbidium Show in August. It is now called The Spring Orchid Show. There is a meeting of participants at the Rogasch residence on the 20th of July. Volunteers were called for a fund raising BBQ at the Cannington Bunnings on Saturday the 12th of August with roster times of 7 to 10, 10 to noon, noon to 2 and 2 to 4. Ken will be running our sales table - his way.

10. Ken and Chris Jones were thanked for the last home visit. Ray and Peta will host the one on the 30th of July.

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Tara's Orchids

Isochilus aurantiacus


Isochilus linearus


Laelia anceps var. veitchiana

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STANHOPEAS by Bill Mather & Ken Jones

See the whole article HERE
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Tony & Mavis's Orchid


Phalaenopsis bellina


Stenorrhycnhos speciosum


Zelenkoa onusta

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As usual, any and all comments are welcome

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