Newsletter of the

Species Orchid Society of

Western Australia (Inc)

Vol 32 No 8

January

2021

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PDF Versions

2021

DECEMBER 21
NOVEMBER 21
OCTOBER 21
SEPTEMBER 21
AUGUST 21
JULY 21
JUNE 21
MAY 21
APRIL 21
MARCH 21
FEBRUARY 21
JANUARY 21

2020

DECEMBER 20
NOVEMBER 20
OCTOBER 20
SEPTEMBER 20
AUGUST 20
JULY 20
JUNE 20
MAY 20
APRIL 20
MARCH 20
FEBRUARY 20
JANUARY 20

2019

DECEMBER 19
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OCTOBER 19
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AUGUST 19
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JANUARY 19

2018

DECEMBER 18
NOVEMBER 18
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APRIL 18 MARCH 18
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JANUARY 18

2017

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JANUARY 17

2016

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JANUARY 16

2015

DECEMBER 15
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OCTOBER 15
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AUGUST 15
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MAY 15
APRIL 15
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FEBRUARY 15

2014
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NOVEMBER 14
OCTOBER 14
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AUGUST 14
JULY 14
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MAY 14
APRIL 14
MARCH 14

FEBRUARY 14

2013
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OCTOBER 13
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AUGUST 13
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FEBRUARY 13

2012
DECEMBER 12
NOVEMBER 12
OCTOBER 12
SEPTEMBER 12
AUGUST 12
JULY 12
JUNE 12
MAY 12
APRIL 12
MARCH 12

FEBRUARY 12

2011
DECEMBER 11
NOVEMBER 11
OCTOBER 11
SEPTEMBER 11
AUGUST 11
JULY 11
JUNE 11
MAY 11
APRIL 11
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FEBRUARY 11

2010

DECEMBER 10
NOVEMBER 10
OCTOBER 10
SEPTEMBER 10
AUGUST 10
JULY 10

JUNE 10
MAY 10
APRIL 10
MARCH 10
FEBRUARY 10

2009
NOVEMBER 09
OCTOBER 09
SEPTEMBER 09

AUGUST 09
JULY 09
JUNE 09

MAY 09
APRIL 09
MARCH 09
FEBRUARY 09
JANUARY 09

2008
NOVEMBER 08
OCTOBER 08
SEPTEMBER 08
AUGUST 08
JULY 08
JUNE 08
MAY 08
APRIL 08

MARCH 08
FEBRUARY 08
JANUARY 08

2007
NOVEMBER 07
OCTOBER 07
SEPTEMBER 07
AUGUST 07
JULY 07
JUNE 07

MAY 07

Members of Note
Quiet Achievers
&
Life Members

Members Orchid Collections

Members can have pictures of their orchid collection posted here. Just email Tony

Michael Zink's Orchids

Brassavola nodosa

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Orchid Articles

Paul Carver's
Angreaceum
sesquipedale

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

December General Meeting:-


The General Meetings will be conducted in accordance with State Government and City of Canning COVID-19 guidelines. If you have a temperature, fever, respiratory infection symptoms or are feeling unwell, please do not attend. Tea, coffee, juice and water will be provided.
Members are asked to assist in cleaning surfaces after the meeting. All tables, switches and door handles are to cleaned and disinfected, and we will also disinfect all chairs used. Hand sanitiser will be provided and members are asked to use it.
Please ensure your signature in the attendance book is legible. Visitors will be asked to provide their name and contact details.

NEXT MEETING -

Tuesday 1st December at @ 7.45
AT WILSON COMMUNITY HALL
,
Braibrise Rd, WILSON

Catch up with us on Facebook!!

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Anne O'Callaghan Cultural Award:

Awarded to Victor for his plant of Mystacidium capense.

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MINUTES OF THE GENERAL MEETING 1 December 2020 7.45pm

Present: 29 members as per register.
Apologies: 5 as per register.
Visitors: Katia, David, Jenni, Lana, Zel
New members: Zel # 27
Minutes: Acceptance of minutes from November meeting moved Arnold, seconded Jacqui. Carried
Business Arising: Nil

Raffle: All members received a free orchid for Christmas.
Badge Prize: Margaret.

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Lynne's Orchid


Oncidium strictum
(syn Symphoglossum sanguineum)

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FORTH-COMING EVENTS
Home visits:

At 10 am on the Sunday after the fourth Thursday of each month. Please bring chairs and food to share.


SATURDAY the 30 Jan 2021 - Ezi-Gro Orchids, Darch


28 Feb 2021 Tara, Greenmount


28 Mar 2021 Ray & Peta, Bullsbrook

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Peter's Orchids

Dendrobium antennatum


Maxillaria tonsbergii


Miltonia phymatochila

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NOTES FROM YOUR COMMITTEE

1. Our first meeting in the new year will be Tuesday 12 January 2021.


2. The January Home Visit is at Ezi-Gro Orchids, 76 Evandale Road Lansdale on Saturday 30 January. Kevin will provide a sausage sizzle for lunch, members please bring salads or dessert/fresh fruit to share.


3. We wish all members a safe and happy festive season, and thank you for your support throughout 2020.


4. The SOSWA Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/groups/219560839402971/?fref=nf

Please take the time to look at the page and the photos posted by members. Advertising plants for sale is permitted on Fridays

5. If you haven't ordered your new badge yet, please see Mich. The cost for badges with a magnetic clip is $13.50, and with pin is $11.50.

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Charly & Gerda's Orchid

 


Bulbophyllum kubahense

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Editor e-mail: - Ph/Fax: 9296 1765

On-line Membership Form PDF or WORD

Download; Plant Display Template

Species Orchid Society Rules PDF

Albany Inter Society Orchid Display & Workshop

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Financial Report: Treasurer's report was presented by Treasurer Adrian. Account balance $10,455.87. Acceptance moved Arnold, seconded Norm. Carried

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Graham & Margaret's Orchids

Encyclia chloroleuca

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General Business:


1. Peter thanked members that donated plants for the free Christmas raffle. Dee will distribute raffle tickets to each individual or family member. Thanks to members who provided festive food and refreshments for tonight's Christmas celebration. Peter reminded members and visitors to sign the register that is required to meet the City of Canning and State COVID-19 requirements.


2. David Jones book on Australian Orchids. Cost $170 plus $20 postage if ordered before the end of the year. $50 deposit required. Order from AOF. If you are interested, please see Graham, Tony or Ken.


3. Ken advised members of the impending changes to the state DPIRD biosecurity arrangements applying to the hobbyist plant (maximum 20) import permits for orchid plants from the Eastern States. The recent reporting in NSW of an outbreak of the exotic pest Serpentine Leaf Miner, an insect pest that is a serious threat to agriculture and horticulture will result in changes to this arrangement, most likely requiring local DPI inspection of orchids and certification that this pest is not present prior to shipment to WA. The expense of this service will be borne by the importer. [Editor's note-DPIRD have since advised that this decision has been reviewed and no longer applies.]


4. Ken advised members the permit to bring 20 orchids from Eric had been approved and the plants were on their way via Express Post.


5. Peter thanked Adrian & Dee for hosting a very pleasant home visit on Sunday 29 November.


6. Charly & Gerda were congratulated on their HCC award for Bulbophyllum kubahense 'Josephine'. Charly told members that the very large plant he had on display had grown from a single growth imported some years ago. To date, this species has received only two awards, both in Germany in June 2018. Charly also presented divisions of one of his plants of Bulbophyllum kubahense to Peter, Tony, Maxine and Ken. Thank you Charly for your generosity.

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Tony & Mavis's Orchid

Tolumnia variegata

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The genus Phaius (Continued from December 2020)

Phaius pauciflorus (Blume) Blume 1856 is found in peninsular Malaysia, Java and Sumatra as a large warm - cool growing terrestrial in deep hill and lower montane Cameron Highlands forests often near rivers at 500 - 1,900m. Close set, basally thickened, terete stems carrying 5-6, plicate, oblong, acuminate leaves. Flowering on basal 25cm, 8-15 successively flowered inflorescences with persistent bracts, there are several recognised colour variants of this highly variable species. This might indicate that further research will find that some variants are in fact separate species. Its common name is the Few Flowered Phaius, and synonyms are Limatodis pallida (Ridl.) Ridl. 1924; Limatodis pauciflora Blume 1825; Limatodis punctata Lindl. 1885; Phaius pallidus Ridl. 1896; Phaius pauciflorus subsp. sabahensis J.J.Wood & A.L.Lamb 1993; Phaius pauciflorus var. pallidus (Ridl.) Holttum 1947; Phaius pauciflorus var. punctatus (Lindl.) J.J.Sm. 1920; Phaius pauciflorus var. sumatranus J.J.Sm. 1920 Phaius pauciflorus (Blume) Blume


Photo source:


Phaius philippinensis N.E.Br. 1889 comes from the Philippines where it is a small sized, warm to cool growing bog terrestrial in shady locations up to 1,300m. Cylindrical pseudobulbs carry 2-4, lanceolate, deeply channelled leaves. Flowering takes place on erect, several flowered inflorescences that carry the reddish-brown, heavy substance flowers at the apex. Its common name is naturally the Philippine Phaius.

 

Photo source:

Phaius reflexipetalus J.J.Wood & Shim 1994 can be found in northern Borneo and the Philippines as a medium sized, warm to cool growing terrestrial in deep humus amongst limestone boulders in deep shade often near rivers in hill forests at 500 -1,100m. Erect, fleshy, dark green stems are enveloped by 4-5, tubular, acute to acuminate, scarious sheaths, and carry 3-4, elliptic, acuminate, plicate leaves. Flowering in spring and autumn, flowers are borne on erect 21- 27 cm inflorescences that arise from the axils of the lower stem sheaths. Inflorescences have tubular, acute bracts and deciduous floral bracts. Its common name is the Reflexed Petal Phaius for the sharply reflexed petals. Synonyms in use include Calanthe reflexipetala

Photo source:

Photo source:


Phaius robertsii F.Muell. 1883 comes from Papua new Guinea, New Caledonia, Fiji, Tonga, Vanuatu and north-eastern Queensland as a medium sized, hot to warm growing terrestrial in medium to deep shade in forests at 550m. Stout erect stems carry 4-6, plicate leaves that are sub-erect and scattered along the stem. Each leaf is lanceolate-elliptic, acuminate and gradually narrows at lower end into the shortly petiolate base. This species flowers in winter on erect, lateral 30cm few-flowered inflorescences. Its common name is Roberts' Phaius, and synonyms in use are Phaius monticola Guillaumin 1941.


Photo source:


Phaius subtrilobus Ames & C. Schweinf. 1920 is endemic to Sarawak and Sabah (Borneo) where it grows as a large sized, cool growing terrestrial in lower montane mossy and swamp forests at 1,300-1,600m. This attractive species flowers in summer with 4-10 flowers on the upright inflorescence. The white lip is in striking contrast to the brownish-red colour of the sepals and petals. Its common name is the Almost-Three Lobed Phaius


Photo source:


In-situ photo source:


Phaius takeoi (Hayata) H.J.Su 1989 comes from south Yunnan, Vietnam and Taiwan as a warm to cool growing terrestrial in moist broad leaved forests and dense forests along valleys at 500-1,400m. The stem-like, cylindric pseudobulb carries 5-8 leaves on the upper part of the pseudobulbs with elliptic to elliptic-lanceolate, plicate, glabrous, long acuminate leaves. Flowering in Autumn on erect racemes that arise from basal and lower nodes of the pseudobulb, the 30-55cm inflorescence is shorter than the leaves and carries 4-10 yellowish-green widely opening flowers with persistent, ovate-lanceolate floral bracts. In 2010, this species was first reported from Thailand and Myanmar. Its common name is Takeo's Phaius after its discoverer, and in China, as Chang Jing He Ding Lan. Synonyms in use are Calanthe takeoi Hayata 1920; and Phaius longicruris Z.H.Tsi 1981.

Photo source:

In-situ photo source

Phaius tankervilleae (Banks) Blume 1856 is the most widely found and best known Phaius species. It is found in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, the Pacific Islands, Malaysia, Singapore, Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Sulawesi, Lesser Sunda Islands, Moluccas, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Himalayas, Sri Lanka Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Japan, and Australia as a large sized, hot to cool growing terrestrial in lower montane woods and in grasslands in moist depressions with black soil up to 1,300m. Ovoid or conical, green pseudobulbs are basally enveloped by leaf bearing sheaths with elliptic-lanceolate, acuminate, plicate, thin-textured leaves. Mostly flowering in spring (although some populations flower year round) on up to 1.2m upright flower racemes, 4-14 showy large, pleasantly fragrant brown flowers have distinctive reddish labellum. There are many colour and albinistic forms following the publication of Lady Tankerville's Legacy - A Historical and Monographic Review of Phaius and Gasrtrorchis by J.V.Stone & P.J.Cribb in 2017 which reduced many species, including Phaius australis, to synonymy.
Phaius tankervilleae was introduced into England in 1778 by John Fothergill, who brought the plant from China. The genus was identified by Juan Loureiro, who also named it using the Greek word phaios (swarthy), probably because of the yellow-brown flower colour that dominates the genus. Phaius tankervilleae is commonly called the nun's orchid, possibly due to the lateral view of the column which resembles a Madonna. Phaius tankervilleae has become an invasive species in some countries such as Jamaica and Hawaii, while in Papua New Guinea, the smoked flowers are eaten as a contraceptive.

Photo source:


Its common names are the Nun's Orchid, the Kunai [tall grass] Orchid, Emma
Tankerville's Phaius [named for the English Orchid Enthusiast after whom the species is named ], in Thailand Ueang phrao, In Japan- Kaku-ran - Chiru-ran - Sarunkwa-bana and in China He Ding Lan.
The recognised varietal forms of Phaius tankervilleae are:
* Phaius tankervilleae (Banks) Blume, Mus. Bot. 2: 177 (1856).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. antoninae (P.Balzer) J.V.Stone & P.J.Cribb, Lady Tankerville's Legacy: 103 (2017).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. australis (F.Muell.) J.V.Stone & P.J.Cribb, Lady Tankerville's Legacy: 105 (2017).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. baolocensis (Duy, Tao Chen & D.X.Zhang) J.V.Stone & P.J.Cribb, Lady Tankerville's Legacy: 108 (2017).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. bernaysii (Rowland ex Rchb.f.) J.V.Stone & P.J.Cribb, Lady Tankerville's Legacy: 111 (2017).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. devogelii P.J.Cribb & J.V.Stone, Lady Tankerville's Legacy: 115 (2017).
* Phaius tankervilleae var. tankervilleae.


Phaius tankervilleae var. australis
Photo source:


Synonyms are Bletia incarvillei R. Br; Bletia tankervilleae R. Br. 1813; Calanthe bachmaensis Gagnep. 1950; Calanthe speciosa Viell. 1861; Dendrobium veratrifolium Roxb. 1832; Limodorum incarvilliae Pers. 1807; Limodorum incarvillei Blume 1825;
Limodorum spectabile Salisb. 1796; Limodorum tancarvilleae L'Hér. 1789; Limodorum tankervilleae Banks 1788; Pachyne spectabilis Salisb. 1812; Phaius bicolor Lindley 1831; Phaius blumei Lindley 1831; Phaius blumei Lindl var assamicus Rchb.f 1882; Phaius blumei Lindl var pulcher King & Pantl. 1898; Phaius carroni F. Muell. 1860 ; Phaius giganteus Hemsl. 1882; Phaius grandifolius Rchb.f 1828; Phaius grandifolius Lour 1790; Phaius grandifolius Lindl.1831; Phaius grandifolius var. superbus Van Houtte 1852; Phaius incarvillei O.Ktze. 1891; Phaius incarvillei var. speciosa O.Ktze.; Phaius leucophaeus F. Muell. 1863; Phaius mannii Rchb.f 1878; Phaius oweniae Sander 1894; Phaius roeblingii O'Brien 1895; Phaius sinensis Rolfe 1913; Phaius tahitensis Schltr. 1926; Phaius tankervilleae fma. alboflorens S.S.Ying, Coloured Ill. Fl. Taiwan 4: 798 (1992; Phaius tahitensis fma. obtusa F.Br. 1930; Phaius tankervilleae fma. veronicae S.Y.Hu & Barretto 1976; Phaius tankervilleae var. mariesii Rchb.f. 1882; Phaius tankervilleae var. pulchra (King & Pantl.) Karth. 1989; Phaius tankervilleae var. superbus (Van Houtte) S.Y.Hu 1974; Phaius tenuis Rchb. f. 1857; Phaius veratrifolius (Roxb.) Lindl. 1840; Tankervillia cantoniensis Link 1829


Contd next month

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Ken & Chris

Ascocentrum garayi


Cattleya lobata


Paphiopedilum thaianum


Pleurothallis stricta

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Correspondence:

Inwards:
E-mails - Orchids WA notices, draft minutes, submissions, AOC AGM reports
E-mail - City of Canning - COVID-19
requirements
AOF - David Jones book on Australian orchids
Circular memorandum and annual report from GCA
Associations on-line newsletter
AOC update
Outwards:
E-mail - City of Canning re COVID-19 requirements
Acceptance of correspondence report moved Lynne, seconded Charly. Carried

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MONTHLY PLANT
Angraecum didieri
Country of origin: Madagascar

Description: Diminutive Angraecoid species

Difficulty: It is a hot-warm growing species, so will require summer humidity and winter protection from cold

Cost: $10.00

Photo and comments by Gary Yong Gee....

I put a post on OrchidsForum which shows Angraecum didieri.

During the Orchid Conservation Alliance tour to Madagascar in September 2019, some of us managed to find this plant of Angraecum didieri in Vakona Forest, Andasibe. This habitat was forested with trees that provided light shade and the elevation was at around 940 m altitude.

This particular plant was epiphytic but was not well-rooted to the host tree.


Another view of the same flower shows more of the elongate stem as well as the short broad glossy leaves. It may not be very obvious, but I noticed in this image that the leaves have a white-speckled or almost white-pitted surface.

Many plants of Angcm. didieri, Angcm. elephantinum in cultivation turn out to be Angcm. rutenbergianum.

I hope that helps.

Gary Yong Gee

Angraecum didieri Baill. 1902 SECTION Perrierangraecum Schlechter can be found as a miniature sized, hot to warm growing epiphyte in humid evergreen forests in eastern and southwestern Madagascar at 300 -1,000m. The species flowers in spring on a short inflorescence that carries a solitary pleasantly fragrant white flower. Thanks Peter for growing these plants on for us.


Angraecum didieri has an elongate stem. In mature plants, the upper third carrying the short leaves. This hot-cool growing species will grow better on a slab mount of either hardwood, natural cork, plastic pond filter or similar material than in a pot. It will also need to be provided with humidity during summer, and if grown in a shadehouse, protection from cold winter/spring temperatures and rain.


As they are diminutive plants, even though the leaves are somewhat leathery, Angraecum didieri seems attractive to hard and soft scale and mealy bug, and plants can quickly succumb to these sap-sucking insects.


However, it seems that there is some confusion about this species. Jay Phal asserts that many of the flower photos published on the internet are incorrect. Angraecum didieri, Angraecum elephantinum, Angraecum
ruttenburgianum
and Angraecum peyrotii are all very similar species, principally differing in the leaf size and shape and labellum. All the photos that I could find seem to have leaves somewhat larger than the drawing published in Jay's Internet Orchid Species Photo Encyclopaedia. I was unable to find any further commentary about this issue. Given these concerns, I have chosen a photo from Marni Turkel as I respect her knowledge and expertise.

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Victor's Orchid

Mystacidium capense

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FOR SALE/WANTED

Harry would like to purchase the following.

Brassavola cucculata,
varieties of Cattleya guttata, amethystoglossa or leopoldii/tigrina
If you have spare plants/divisions for sale, please contact Harry on 0412 403 696 or by e-mail to
harry.ashton@live.com.au

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John's Orchid


Laelia purpurata
var. russelliana

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A message from The Water Corporation

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The difference between

Phalaenopsis amabilis & Phal. aphrodite subsp. formosana

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An Introduction to the Genus Masdevallia

See the full article HERE

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The Genus Dendrobium

See the full article HERE

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WA terrestrial orchids in situ – a four-day field trip to the Mid-west

http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/Orchids_in_The_Mid-west.htm

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Recently Identified Paphiopedilum Species

See the article HERE

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Unusual and Surprising Orchids and their
Reproductive Biology
by Ken Jones

See the article HERE

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Orchids in Their Natural Habitat and in Cultivation -
Ecuagenera's five-day pre-WOC tour

See the full article HERE

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Fiona Stanley Hospital Site Terrestrial Orchids

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Hygienic Practice

The benefits of hygienic practice in keeping your collection free of plant diseases.

Hygiene tips to keep your orchids disease free.

Checklist in WORD in PDF

See the full article HERE

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STANHOPEAS by Bill Mather & Ken Jones

See the article HERE

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As usual, any and all comments are welcome

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