Newsletter of the

Species Orchid Society of

Western Australia (Inc)

Vol 30 No 9

February

2019

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PDF Versions

2019

DECEMBER 19
NOVEMBER 19
OCTOBER 19
SEPTEMBER 19
AUGUST 19
JULY 19
JUNE 19
MAY 19
APRIL 19
MARCH 19
FEBRUARY 19
JANUARY 19

2018

DECEMBER 18
NOVEMBER 18
OCTOBER 18
SEPTEMBER 18
AUGUST 18
JULY 18
JUNE 18
MAY 18
APRIL 18 MARCH 18
FEBRUARY 18

JANUARY 18

2017

DECEMBER 17
NOVEMBER 17
OCTOBER 17
SEPTEMBER 17
AUGUST 17
JULY 17
JUNE 17
MAY 17
APRIL 17
MARCH 17
FEBRUARY 17

JANUARY 17

2016

DECEMBER 16
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OCTOBER 16
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MAY 16
APRIL 16
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FEBRUARY 16

JANUARY 16

2015

DECEMBER 15
NOVEMBER 15
OCTOBER 15
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AUGUST 15
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APRIL 15
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FEBRUARY 15

2014
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NOVEMBER 14
OCTOBER 14
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AUGUST 14
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FEBRUARY 14

2013
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AUGUST 13
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FEBRUARY 13

2012
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AUGUST 12
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APRIL 12
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FEBRUARY 12

2011
DECEMBER 11
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OCTOBER 11
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AUGUST 11
JULY 11
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MAY 11
APRIL 11
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FEBRUARY 11

2010

DECEMBER 10
NOVEMBER 10
OCTOBER 10
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AUGUST 10
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JUNE 10
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APRIL 10
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FEBRUARY 10

2009
NOVEMBER 09
OCTOBER 09
SEPTEMBER 09

AUGUST 09
JULY 09
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MAY 09
APRIL 09
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FEBRUARY 09
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2008
NOVEMBER 08
OCTOBER 08
SEPTEMBER 08
AUGUST 08
JULY 08
JUNE 08
MAY 08
APRIL 08

MARCH 08
FEBRUARY 08
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2007
NOVEMBER 07
OCTOBER 07
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AUGUST 07
JULY 07
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MAY 07

Members of Note
Quiet Achievers
&
Life Members

Members Orchid Collections

Members can have pictures of their orchid collection posted here. Just email Tony

Michael Zink's Orchids

Brassavola nodosa

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Orchid Articles

Paul Carver's
Angreaceum
sesquipedale

Editor e-mail: - Ph/Fax: 9296 1765

On-line Membership Form PDF or WORD

Download; Plant Display Template

Species Orchid Society Rules PDF

Inter Society Orchid Display & Workshop

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NEXT MEETING - TUESDAY 12th February @ 7.45
AT WILSON COMMUNITY HALL
,
Braibrise Rd, WILSON

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Anne O'Callaghan Cultural Award:

Awarded to Siva for Coelogyne usitana.
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MINUTES OF THE GENERAL MEETING

February 2019

Present: 39 members as per register.
Apologies: Andrea, Dee, Tony and Sandy.
Visitors: Nil.
New members: Nil.
Minutes: Minutes December meeting
accepted (Ken, Ian)
Business Arising: Nil

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Helens Orchid


Lycaste aromatica

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Correspondence:

Inwards

City of Canning (2019 Booking confirmation and receipt of payment)


Lotterywest (Expenditure acquittal accepted)


SOSWA Logo embroidery


Gordon about his change of address.


Outwards:
Membership (78) to GCA for insurance calculations)


Gordon (get well card)


Lotterywest acquittal for the Spring Show.

Raffle: Ray, Paul, Ian, Lina and Mich.
Name Badge: Kirsty

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Graham & Margaret 's Orchids

Brassia brachiata


Brassia verrucosa

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FORTH-COMING EVENTS
Home visits:
At 10 am on the Sunday after the fourth Thursday of each month. Please bring chairs and food to share.


19 January (Saturday)- Ezi Gro Orchids, Evandale Road, Lansdale - note this is a week earlier than the usual date.
3 March - Chris, Sorrento

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Ian's Orchids


Encyclia atrorubens Ron Parsons said....Encyclia atrorubens is not that species, and is very possibly a hybrid involving E. cordigera.


Encyclia cordigera 'Gertrude' x 'Lionstianum'
Gary Yong Gee says.... Encyclia cordigera looks to me to be E. Chiapas [E. cordigera x E. adenocaula]. E. adenocaula has narrowed the petals and the apices no longer curl inwards.


Encyclia osmantha.
Gary Yong Gee says.... Encyclia osmantha is E. oncidioides

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FOR SALE/WANTED

Victor wants to acquire a plant of Rhynchostele rossii and is also interested in small Angraecoid species. If you have spare plants, please contact Victor on 9243 1843 or e-mail vnquin@gmail.com

Lynn wants to acquire plants of Oncidium (Odontoglossum) naevium, and Dendrobium aggregatum (lindleyii) and farmeri if you have a spare plant. She is also collecting wine/champagne corks if you have any that you do not want. Please phone Lynn on 0414 922 923 or e-mail contrarymiss@hotmail.com

Nahiid is looking for plants of Phalaenopsis gigantea, Phalaenopsis hieroglyphica and Phalaenopsis bellina. If you have any spare plants of these species, please phone
Nahiid on 0415 818 850 or e-mail her at

N.Stephens@murdoch.edu.au

Harry is hoping to acquire a plant of Epidendrum densiflorum. If you have a spare division, please call Harry on 0412 403 696 or e-mail
harry.ashton@live.com.au

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Lynn's Orchid


Dendrobium lindleyi

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Victor's Orchids

Angraecum magdalenae


Cattleya tenebrosa


Eulophia petersii

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A message from The Water Corporation

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The difference between

Phalaenopsis amabilis & Phal. aphrodite subsp. formosana

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Ken & Chris's Orchids

Cymbidium ensifolium


Encyclia alata.
Gary Yong Gee says.... Encyclia alata is E. belizensis. E. alata has broader lip side-lobes and a very broad lip mid-lobe with a pronounced yellow margin. Most E. alata have the apical half of the sepals and petals dark brown.


Mormolyca ringens


Phalaenopsis deliciosa


Schomburgkia albopurpurea.
Ron Parsons said...I think the Schomburgkia atropurpurea (which is correctly a Myrmecophila) is definitely a hybrid.

Gary Yong Gee says.... I also have this plant also purchased as Schomburgkia albopurpurea which is now recognised by the WCSP as Myrmecophila thompsoniana var. thompsoniana [probably from the same source]. It seems to me to be a Myrmecophila intergeneric hybrid. I have not yet been able to determine the likely parentage.

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WA terrestrial orchids in situ – a four-day field trip to the Mid-west

http://members.iinet.net.au/~emntee/Orchids_in_The_Mid-west.htm

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Maxine's Orchids


Cattleya cinnabarina


Cattleya forbesii


Cattleya purpurata
fma. carnea

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The Genus Dendrobium

Contd from last month


The typical flower form is relatively open although Dendrobium nobile var. cooksonianum is more intensely coloured and has larger petals and sepals.

 

 

 


Photo source:

 

 

 


Dendrobium nobile var. virginalis is an alba form.
Photo source:

Its common name is the Noble Dendrobium. In Thailand, it is known as Ueang Khao Kiu; in China Shi Hu. Synonyms in use are Callista nobilis (Lindl.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium coerulescens Wallich 1838; Dendrobium formosanum [Rchb.f]Masamune 1933;
Dendrobium lindleyanum Griffith 1851; Dendrobium nobile f. nobilius (Rchb.f.) M.Hiroe 1971; Dendrobium nobile var. alboluteum Huyen & Aver. 1989; Dendrobium nobile var. formosanum Rchb.f. 1883; Dendrobium nobile var. nobilius Rchb.f. 1833; Dendrobium nobile virginale Rolfe 1900; Dendrobium wallichianum B.S.Williams 1862.

Dendrobium parishii Low 1863 SECTION Dendrobium comes from China, Assam, Bangladesh, Eastern Himalayas, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam where is grows as an epiphyte in broadleaf, evergreen, lowland forests and primary montane forests at 250-1,700m. It is a small to medium sized, hot to cool growing species with erect or slightly pendant yellowish stems enveloped by white, membraneous sheaths carrying narrowly ovate to elliptic, obtuse, stiff, leathery, blunt, deciduous leaves that are apically notched. Fragrant, longlasting flowers borne on short 2-3 flowered racemes occur from February to August with a peak time May and June. Flowers arise from the nodes on the upper half of old, pendulous, leafless canes. Various colour forms are known including albinistic and coerulea variants.

Its common name is Parish's Dendrobium, named after an 1800's English missionary and orchid collector. In Thailand, it is known as Ueang sai nam khrang - Ueang attakrit - Ueang inthakrit - Ueang sai nam khrang, and in China as Zi Ban Shi Hu

 

 

The pure alba form is less often seen but is very attractive
Photos source:
Synonyms in use are Callista parishii (Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Callista rhodopterygia (Rchb. f.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium polyphlebium Rchb.f. 1887; Dendrobium rhodopterygium Rchb.f 1875

 

Dendrobium primulinum Lindley 1858 SECTION Dendrobium is found in Assam, Eastern Himalayas, Nepal, Western Himalayas, Andaman Islands, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, China and Vietnam. It is large, warm growing, pendant epiphyte that grows on deciduous trees at 500-1,000m. This species grows in habitats where it receives direct sunlight for a minimum of 3 hours each day. Dendrobium primulinum has clustered, ascending, prostrate or pendulous, terete, sulcate stems covered in white sheath. Flowering from winter through to summer, flowers are borne on short inflorescences with minute bracts and 1or 2 fragrant flowers. The flower stems arise from nodes along leafless canes.
Several colour variants of this species are known including alba, albinistic and predominantly yellow. Its common name is the Primrose Yellow Dendrobium, while in Thailand it is known as Ueang Sai Nam Phung


Photo source:
Some authors consider this species to be synonymous with Dendrobium polyanthum. Other synonyms in use are Callista primulina (Lindl.) Kuntze 1891 and Dendrobium nobile var. pallidiflorum Hooker 1856.

 

 

Photo source:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Photo source:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dendrobium pulchellum Roxb. 1832 SECTION Dendrobium is found in Assam India, Bangladesh, eastern Himalayas, Nepal, Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia, Laos, China and Vietnam at 70-2,200m. It is a large, hot to cool growing epiphyte that is found in open deciduous forests with hot, wet humid summers and cooler, drier winters. It has erect, slender, terete, purplish with age, up to 2m stems enveloped by purple-striped leaf sheaths and carrying persistent, linear-oblong, cordate at base, obtuse or acute leaves. Blooming from late winter to spring, on drooping several flowered inflorescences up to 30 cm long arise laterally from nodes near the apex of leafed and leafless canes. The 5-15, long-lasting, up to 13cm flowers are pleasantly fragrant. Several colour forms are known including albinistic variants. This species common name is the Charming Dendrobium while in Thailand, it is known as Ueang chang nao - Ueang takwai

Photo source:

Synonyms in use are Callista pulchella (Roxb. ex Lindl.) Kuntze 1891; Dendrobium brevifolium Lindl. 1858;
Dendrobium dalhousieanum Wallich 1844; Dendrobium moschatum Griff. 1851


Photos source:

 


Dendrobium signatum Rchb. f. 1884 SECTION Dendrobium comes from Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam at 200-1,500m. It is a medium sized, hot to cool growing epiphyte with slender, fleshy, becoming pendulous with age pseudobulbs carrying leathery, lanceolate, pointed, eventually deciduous leaves.

Flowering from winter to early summer, two long-lived, fragrant flowers are borne on short inflorescences that arise on a mature leafless cane towards the apex. Several colour variants are known.

Photo source:

 

 

 

A different colour form. Photo source:

This species common name is the Marked Dendrobium. In Thailand, it is known as Kluay mai noi - Ueang kham kiu - Ueang tin nok - Ueang tin pet. Synonyms in use are Dendrobium hildebrandtii Rolfe 1894; Dendrobium tortile var. hildebrandi (Rolfe) T. Tang & F.T. Wang 1951


Dendrobium tortile Lindley 1847 SECTION Dendrobium is found in Assam India, Bangladesh, Andaman Islands, Malaysia, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam at 1,200m. It is a small to medium sized, cool, ascending to pendant growing epiphyte, terrestrial or lithophyte. It has very distinctive club to spindle shaped, grooved and medially flattened stems with tubular leaf sheaths carrying 3 to 4, thin, deciduous, curved, leathery, sharply pointed leaves. Longlasting, fragrant flowers appear from late winter to early summer on axillary up to 8 cm racemes with 2-3 flowers per inflorescence. The inflorescences arise from the upper leaf axils of leafless canes. As do many of the species in the Section, flower colour is quite variable with several colour forms known, predominantly pale pink to more intense pink as well as albinistic variants.

This photo from Peter Williams shows Dendrobium tortile growing lithophytically in Thailand.

 


Photo Source:

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Source

Its common name is the Twisted Dendrobium. In Thailand, it is known as Khao kiu.
Synonyms in use are Dendrobium dartoisianum De Wild 1906; Dendrobium haniffi Ridl. ex Burkill 1924

Dendrobium unicum Seidenfadden 1970 SECTION Dendrobium. This species' common name, the Unique Dendrobium is quite appropriate as there are few others like it. Found in Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar and Thailand in evergreen; semi-deciduous and deciduous dry lowland forests and savannah woodlands at 800-1,500m, it is both epiphytic and lithophytic. Some years ago on a trip to Thailand, we saw this species in flower during a prolonged drought.

The plants were severely desiccated and blackened by their exposure to the hot sun (note the lichen on the branches which suggests some humidity is present, perhaps from overnight dew even during drought conditions).

This is a truly miniature species with clustered, small stems carrying 2 to 3, apical, narrow, persistent leaves. Flowering in late spring and early summer, up to 4 fragrant flowers are borne on axillary, short racemes that arise from near and at the apex of leafed and leafless canes. It is similar to Dendrobium dickasonii and Dendrobium lamyaiae but has smaller flowers with a wider cupped lip and three central keels

Closeup flower Photo Source

Contd next month

See the full article (so far) HERE

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Harry's Orchids


Cattleya tenebrosa


Lycaste aromatica

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NOTES FROM YOUR COMMITTEE

1. Your committee has finalised the decision about the embroidered clothing that Mich and Peter have shown us. Please come prepared to give us your order so that we can order the clothing. This apparel will be supplied by http://www.dynastypromo.com.au/ The clothing is from Biz Collection. https://www.bizcollection.com.au/au/products/j125ml;

https://www.bizcollection.com.au/au/products/j126ll;

https://www.bizcollection.com.au/au/products/j307m and

https://www.bizcollection.com.au/au/products/j307l.

Mich will have order forms at the February general meeting.


2. On 13 January, Tony sent an e-mail to members and others about a flask import through Orchid Mania, Queensland. Tony is coordinating our order and currently has approximately 20 flasks ordered. Several of these are shared between two or more members. The flask list and pricing can be viewed on our website AT

If you are interested in being part of this, but haven't got around to it yet , please advise Tony by e-mail to waos@iinet.net.au by Friday 1 February.


3. As discussed at our past monthly meetings, we will need a member to volunteer to be Secretary at our AGM in May. If you are prepared to do so, or want to know more about what work is involved, please ask.


4. Annual membership renewals are due in February. Please pay the Treasurer.

 

5. If you haven't ordered your new badge yet, please see Mich. The cost for badges with a magnetic clip is $13.50, and with pin is $11.50.

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Mich's Orchid


Cyrtopodium andersonii

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Unusual and Surprising Orchids and their
Reproductive Biology
by Ken Jones

Cont. next month

See the whole article (so far) HERE

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Peter's Orchids


Cattleya tenebrosa


Dendrobium x superbiens


Dendrobium unicum


Psychopsis kramerianum

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MONTHLY PLANT

Vanda denisoniana

Difficulty: This species requires winter protection and summer humidity.
Description: Vandaceous species that grows into a large clump over time.
Country of origin: Mainland SE Asia

Photo source:

Cost: $5.00

Vanda denisoniana Bens. & Rchb.f. 1869 SECTION Longicalcarata is found in China, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam in primary montane forests at 450-1,200m. Over time, it can become a large sized, clumping species. A hot to cool growing epiphyte, this species is found on rough-barked primary and secondary forest trees where they receive relatively high light, and constant air movement. The long fleshy roots extend up and down the trees, and are fully exposed to the air. These plants were deflasked and grown on by Charly from a flask purchased by Tony and Mavis in Thailand in 2017.
The most effective culture for vandaceous species seems to be hanging slatted plastic or wooden baskets as the majority of the orchid's roots will grow in the air outside the container rather than in the media. While plants are small, it is advisable to fill the basket with medium sized bark that must be free draining. The roots will grow through the media and out through the bottom of the basket.
However, this can be one of the challenges in growing Vanda species as the roots will readily find other pots to invade, or will attach to your benching, walls, floor etc.
This genus is generally resistant to many of the insect pests and pathogens that attack our orchids, however care needs to be taken that water does not remain in the top leaf axil overnight. As a monopodial species, airborne fungal pathogens that can infect this area and lead to damage to the growing stem. Unless a side growth appears, the plant will most likely die.
Finely ground cinnamon sprinkled into the top leaf axil can help the plant resist
infection. You will need to keep this species drier, and warmer during winter. For more helpful growing advice, see..............

http://ljunggrens.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Vanda-denisoniana.pdf

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Siva's Orchid

Coelogyne usitana

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Noel & Eva's Orchid


Stanhopea tigrina var. nigroviolacea

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Orchids in Their Natural Habitat and in Cultivation -
Ecuagenera's five-day pre-WOC tour

See the full article HERE

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Adrian & Dee's Orchids


Anacheilium trulla


Brassia brachiata


Saccolabiopsis armitii x self

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Fiona Stanley Hospital Site Terrestrial Orchids

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Hygienic Practice

The benefits of hygienic practice in keeping your collection free of plant diseases.

Hygiene tips to keep your orchids disease free.

Checklist in WORD in PDF

See the full article HERE

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Financial Report: Tabled by Adrian. Current balance is $10,480.68. (Ray, Lynn

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Tony & Mavis's Orchids

Brassavola cucullata


Brassovola nodosa


Dendrobium amabile


Phalaenopsis deliciosa


Trichocentrum tigrinum


Vanda tessellata
var. alba

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STANHOPEAS by Bill Mather & Ken Jones

See the article HERE

 

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General Business:

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As usual, any and all comments are welcome

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