Laser Regulation

Laser radiation is potentially hazardous to spectators, performers and operators of laser displays and shows. Hence, steps must be taken to mitigate the hazards. The Australian New Zealand Standard™ Safety of laser products (AS/NZS IEC 60825). provides classification of laser equipment and sets out requirements for their safe use. The Standard also defines maximum exposure limits (MPE) applicable to each classification.

Part 3 of the Standard Guidance for laser displays and shows (AS/NZS IEC 60825.3:2016) provides specific criteria to be followed in the planning, design, installation and operation of laser displays involving high-power lasers for public events.

In Western Australia the Standard is enforced by The Radiation Safety Act 1975.

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Laser Services

LaserAge provides Laser Safety Services in Western Australia including:

  • Liasson with WA Radiological Council (WARC).
  • Liasson with Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).
  • Preparation and conveyancing temporary laser registration permit applications with WARC.
  • Preparation and conveyanding of applications for outdoor events with CASA.
  • Auditing and compliance monitoring for laser displays and shows.
  • Consultation and guidance for the safe use of laser systems in displays and shows.

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Laser History

The principles underlying laser operation were first proposed in 1916 by Einstein and furthered by Fabrikant in 1940. It was not until 1960 that the first laser was constructed. Based on a rod of ruby crystal, it produced pulses of red light. In 1961 a gas laser was constructed using a mixture of helium and neon gases, producing continuous output of red light. A liquid laser, based on inorganic dyes, a was contructed in 1966, producing pulses of infra-red light. In the years since, a wide variety of lasers have been developed, making use of solids, liquids, gases, semiconductor materials and even free electrons. Modern lasers are able to produce light over a large portion of the spectrum, from the far infra-red through to ultra-violet and even x-rays.

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