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Rev. Henry Hutton
PARRY

November 15, 1893



Biography | Grave Site | Inscription | Newspaper Reports | Other Material

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Biographical Details

















Description of Grave
Parry 1877-1903:
Site 4.8m x 3.8m, four interments. Two-tier concrete base, white marble plaque on east face of upper slab. Vertical white marble slab surmounted by celtic cross, shamrock motif, now broken off and lying in front of base. IHS design on cross. Condition good. Lead lettering.

Small footstone: Thick white limestone with celtic cross similar design as headstone (no inscription) but ends of arms more rounded.

Mason: Morgan & Sanders, Perth.

Surround: White marble slabs edge the site.

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[East Perth Cemetery: Resting Place of Western Australian Pioneers, J.Richardson & D.Davies, 1986, vol.3, pp.154-5]

Memorial Inscription
In loving memory of Elizabeth Mary Parry, died Novr. 11th 1877 aged 47 years.

Theodore Hutton Parry, died Feby. 27th 1892 aged 11 years.

Also Henry Hutton Parry, second Bishop of Perth, born Decr. 18th 1826, consecrated Bishop Nov. 15th 1868, died Nov. 15th 1893.

"Well done good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord."

"In quietness and in confidence shall be your strength."

"Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord."

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Marble Plaque: Marble Plaque: Also in loving memory of Mary Susanna Parry, born 14th September 1851, died 30th October 1909.

"The Lord is my shepherd, therefore shall I lack nothing."

Newspaper Accounts

Death of the Right Rev. Bishop Parry, D.D.

It is with feelings of the profoundest regret - feelings that we are sure will be shared in by every member of the community - that we record the death of the head of the Anglican Church in this colony, the Right Reverent Henry Hutton Parry, bishop of the diocese. His illness was so sudden and has been followed so quickly by his decease, that it will not be soon realised that one of the best known men in the colony has been suddenly taken from our midst, and that the figure with which most have grown so familiar during the last sixteen or seventeen years will be seen amongst us no more. To all classes, and indeed to people of all creeds, Dr. Parry had endeared himself not only as a faithful, earnest and zealous minister of Christ, but also on account of his quiet, unostentatious mode of living, his regard for all that pertained to the well-being of the community in which he lived, and his kindly tolerance of all beliefs, no matter how widely they differed from his own. He will be missed by the members of his family, to whom in their heavy affliction, the sympathy of everyone goes out with the most earnest wishes that they may be sustained in this the day of their bereavement. He will be missed by his Church, for which he has laboured since his arrival here in 1876, with that love and care, that zeal and perseverance, characterisitc of the true minister of the Gospel. And he will be missed by the community at large, of which, in a quiet and retiring fashion, he was a working member, anxious for its spiritual, moral and temporal welfare.

Bishop Parry was a son of the Right Rev. Thomas Parry, late Bishop of Barbados, and was born in the year 1827. He was educated at Rugby College under the celebrated Dr. Arnold, and he graduated at Balliol College, Oxford, where he took the degree of B.A. in 1851, and seven years later he took his M.A. degree. He received his degree of Doctor of Divinity honeris causa from the University of Durham in 1876, on his being appointed Bishop of Perth. He entered Holy Orders in 1851, when he was ordained deacon, and the following year he entered the priesthood. A large portion of his early ministerial life was spent in the West Indies. From 1851 to 1853 he curate of the Church of the Holy Trinity in Trinidad, and All Saints' Church, Trinidad, for the two following years. He then became a tutor of Codrington College, Barbados and held that position from 1855 to 1860. The following year he served as chaplain to the military forces. In 1861 he was made Arch-deacon of Barbados, and in 1868 he was consecrated Bishop-Coadjutor of Barbados in White Hall Chapel, by Archbishop Thomson, of York, and Bishops Tait (London), Bickersteth (Ripon), and Parry (Barbados). In the year 1876, he was translated to the bishopric of Perth, in which he succeeded the Right Rev. Mathew Blagden Hale, on his translation from this diocese to Brisbane.

Dr. Parry was twice married. His first wife was Miss Thomas, by whom he had two sons, Henry Ernest, and Alfred, and a daughter, Mary, all of whom are living. The late Mrs. Parry was an invalid, and died shortly after her arrival in this colony. Some years afterwards, Bishop Parry married Mrs. Alexander, widow of a former manager of the National Bank, and eldest daughter of Mr. G.W. Leake, M.L.C., and who survives him. The issue of this marriage was three boys and a girl. Of these, Herbert, Lionel, and Maud are living; the other son, it will be remembered, was one of the victims of that unfortunate boating fatality which took place on Melville Water last year.

The Bishop was first taken ill on Sunday, at Bunbury, whither he went on a pastoral visitation, not long after the late session of the Synod concluded. Dr. Lovegrove was called in, and pronounced the complaint to be tonsilitis, which subsequently developed into inflamation of the lungs. It was seen that his condition was serious, and it is not unlikely that the dangerous illness of a similar character which he suffered from in Sydney two years ago, and which followed upon a severe attack of influenza, may have left behind it a certain amount of weakness in the lungs. At any rate, the symptons of pneumonia rapidly declared themselves, and the condition of the sufferer became so critical that Mrs. Parry, who was in Fremantle, was immediately telegraphed for. Accompanied by Dr. Kelsall, Mrs. Parry left at once for Bunbury, which she reached on Monday evening. Dr. Kelsall and Dr. lovegrove both took charge of the case and were in constant attendance upon the patient, and caused the other members of his family to be summoned by telegraph. The sons and daughters left on Tuesday, and arrived at Bunbury during the day. All Monday night and during Tuesday up to about six in the evening, the Bishop seemed to be getting steadily worse, but about six o'clock on Tuesday evening he seemed to rally somewhat, and though in no way out of danger, it was thought he might continue to improve. It was, however, only the change which is so frequently noticeable a few hours before death, and about five o'clock last evening he suffered a relapse, and a change for the worse set in. He rapidly sank, and at nine o'clock he passed away. For some time before his death he was in a state of unconsciousness, though he appeared to suffer pain, but his medical attendants express the opinion that he could not feel it. All the members of his family were present at his deathbed, as were also Sir James Lee Steere, and the Revs. W.F. Marshall and L. Everingham. Archdeacon Watkins and the Rev. Mr. Allen also were with him yesterday, but left Bunbury by the evening special train. The cause of death was, as already stated, acute pneumonia. Arrangements are being made for the conveyance of the body by special train to Perth, where the funeral will take place.

Bishop Parry was, at the time of his death, in the sixty-eighth year of his age, and had spent nearly two-thirds of his life in the ministry. Appointed to the diocese in 1876, he laboured with unwearied zeal in its behalf, fulfilling all the different duties of his office with unceasing care. Apart from the exercise of his priestly and pastoral functions, he devoted much of his time to the other work of the Church. He sought to extend its operations in all directions, and both by personal missions to England and by the use of his influence amongst his friends in the mother country, he was successful in obtaining substantial aid to the diocese from the different Church societies, enabling many more churches to be raised and new districts formed. The present Cathedral was built during his office, and in the improvement which has been effected in the general management and administration of diocesan affairs, he took an active part. He also interested himself in the cause of education, and in the work of the Church of England Temperance Society and other social reforms, and his care for the spiritual and physical well-being of the aboriginal natives of the colony is well known. In these and other ways he showed himself an excellent diocesan, a faithful priest, and a true son to the great Chhurch to which he belonged, and which he loved with an affection and loyalty which made themselves felt in all the actions of his daily life. Probably all those who knew him will agree that in sweetness of temper and amiability of diposition, he was unsurpassed by any of their acquaintance possessing those characteristics.

Our Bunbury correspondent telegraphed last night: "Bishop Parry died a few minutes before nine at the Rectory this evening. He had been ailing since Sunday morning last, and Dr. Lovegrove was then called in. Mrs. Parry, who was at Fremantle, was telegraphed for at once, and in company with Dr. Kelsall travelled down to Bunbury on Monday. The two doctors then jointly took charge of the case and were in constant attendance. The Bishop rallied during the day, but about five o'clock this evening he suffered a relapse and gradually sank, and was unconscious for sometime before his death. he appeared to suffer pain, but his medical attendants are of the opinion that he could not have felt it. All his family were present at his death, as also were Sir James Lee Steere and the Revs. W.F. Marshall and L. Everingham. The cause of death was acute pneumonia."

[The West Australian, Thurs. November 16, 1893, p5]

The Death of the Bishop of Perth.

Funeral Arrangements.

The chief subject of conversation in the city yesterday was the sudden loss which the community has sustained in the death of Dr. Parry, the Anglican Bishop of Perth. In all quarters the expressions of grief at his demise and sympathy with those who are now sorrowing in their bereavement were unfeignedly sincere, and the opinion was universal that by the death of the head of the Church of England in Western Australia, the colony was the poorer, and that from the midst of his fellow colonists had gone one whose like they can hardly hope to see again. Both in his public and private life, his Christian conduct, his unfailing sweet and gentle disposition, his love for his fellow men - a love which has caused it to be said of him, over and over again, that he could neither think nor speak other than kindly of anyone, - his devotion to the highest interests of his church, his regard for his duties as a citizen and a colonist, these all endeared him to all, and it will take time for it to be fully realised that the familiar figure of one so loved and respected will no more be seen amongst us.

Upon the sad tidings becoming public yesterday the flags in different parts of the city were half-masted, and those who were connected with him by family or other ties were the recipients of the condolence of many in Perth. The Methodist Church, which was in session, passed the following resolutuon:- "The Wesleyan Methodist ministers, in Session assembled, desire to place on record their sense of the great loss sustained, not only by the Church of England, but by the whole community, through the death of the late Bishop Parry. They acknowledge the fidelity, ability, courtesy and catholicity with which the late Bishop Parry discharged the duties of his high office. They deeply sympathise with Mrs. Parry and the members of his family in the grievous bereavement which they have sustained, and with the Church in the sad calamity which has overtaken it, and pray that the consolations of the Holy Spirit may abound towards them."

The Rev. G.E. Rowe, the chairman of the Wesleyan Methodist District, sent the following telegram to Mr. H.E. Parry at Bunbury:- "Please convey to Mrs. Parry the sympathy of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in her sad and sudden bereavement and the profound loss the colony has sustained by the death of Bishop Parry."

The rev. gentlemen also referred at the evening service, in sympathetic language, to the sad event.

The special train which conveyed the coffin containing the remains of the deceased, left Bunbury yesterday. Prior to this, a requiem choral service was held in St. Paul's Church, Bunbury, at which the Holy Communion was celebrated by the Revs. W.F. Marshall and L. Everingham, the officiating clergymen. The coffin was conveyed from the Rectory to the railway station at midday, and was followed by a large procession of sorrowing friends. The pall-bearers were: Mr. W.H. Timperley, R.M., Mr. F.E. Stafford, Mr. F. Stokes, Dr. Lovegrove, Mr. T. Paisley and Mr. E.R. Turner, and the chief mourners were Mr. H.E. Parry and Mr. A.E. Parry, sons of the deceased. All the shops and other places of business along the route were closed and draped with crape. Arrived at the railway station, the procession halted and the coffin was placed on the train which left at once for Perth. Mrs. Parry and the members of her family were passengers.

Arrangements were made in Perth to receive the coffin upon its arrival, which was expected to take place shortly after seven o'clock. A large gathering of townspeople met at the railway station, and when the train reached the platform at a quarter-past seven, there was a great concourse of people. Mrs. Parry was met at the station by several of her immediate relatives, and a carriage was in readiness to drive them to the Cathedral. The Very Rev. Dean Goldsmith and the Revs. F. Price, F. Hare, J. Orchard, and H. Wallace, and a choir of forty were present together with leading members of the Church to receive the coffin. When the coffin had been brought out of the train, it was put in the hearse, and the procession then moved in the direction of Barrack-street in the following order:-

The Members of the Cathedral Vestry.
Synodsmen.
Diocesan Council.
The Cathedral Choir.
The Clergy.
The Body.
The Members of the Late Dr. Parry's family.
The general public.

Slowly the mournful cortege passed along the carriage drive into Barrack-street, and thence into St. George's-terrace, and then entered the Cathedral enclosure. A large body of spectators accompanied them, and gathered in numbers as the procession wended its way, until by the time the Cathedral door was reached an immense throng had gathered. The coffin, draped with a pall and covered with wreaths, presented by the choir and friends in Bunbury, Pinjarrah, and Perth, was borne up the aisle, and placed in front of the communion rail, during which time the Cathedral filled with a congregation drawn from every class and every creed in the community. The service which followed was a very quiet one, consisting of psalms and canticles, MagnificatNuno Dimittis recited by the Dean and the clery and the choir, and a short lesson (I Thess. iv. 13), and prayer.

After the service was concluded, the congregation left the building, and after a short interval, the members of the deceased's family also left. The night was divided into watches, one of the clergy being there all night in turns, and other persons were also there keeping vigil for shorter periods. Watch will be continued through the day up till the hour of the funeral.

This morning there will be a celebration of the Holy Communion at six, eight, and ten o'clock. The funeral service, which will be choral, will commence at four o'clock this afternoon, the first part being said in the Cathedral, after which the procession will follow the coffin to the Anglican Cemetery, and the service will be finished there. The choir will attend the service, and besides the Perth clergy, all of those from Fremantle and the country who can manage to leave their districts will be present and take part in the service.

On Sunday next funeral sermons will be preached in St. George's Cathedral, the Ven. Archdeacon Watkins preaching in the morning, and the Very Rev. Dean Goldsmith in the evening.

Our Bunbury correspondent telegraphed as follows, yesterday:- A Requiem Communion service was held in St. Paul's Church this morning, the Revs W.F. Marshall and L. Everingham officiating. The service was choral. Afterwards the coffin was conveyed from the rectory to the railway station, at noon, followed by a large procession of friends and the general public. The pall bearers were: Mr. W.H. Timperley, R.M., Mr. F.E. Stafford, Mr. F. Stokes, Dr. Lovegrove, Mr. T. Paisley and Mr. E.R. Turner; and the chief mourners the deceased's sons, Messrs. H.E. and A.E. Parry. The shops all along the route were closed and draped in black. The train left for Perth shortly after mid-day.

[The West Australian, Fri. November 17, 1893, p2]

The Death of the Right Rev. Bishop Parry, D.D.

The Funeral.

Perhaps a stranger indication of the feelings of profound respect and genuine affection with which the late Anglican Bishop of Perth was regarded by every class in the community could not have been afforded than by the attendance at the funeral, which took place yesterday. Not only did the people of Perth join in paying their last tribute of regard to his life by following the remains of the good Bishop to the grave, but from the different centres of population within immediate access of the city came representatives, clerical and lay, to do honour to one of whomit has been said, on more than one occasion the last day or two, that in his love for his fellows, his loyalty to his Maker, his meek and lowly spirit, and in the other excellencies of his character, he approached nearer to the ideal Christian than it is the fortune of most professing Christians to reach. And from those whom circumstances have prevented from undertaking a visit to Perth have come messages breathing the same spirit of affectionate regard for the late Bishop that has been expressed by those nearer the city wherein is his last resting place. The teaching of our Christian faith, no matter what our shade of belief may be, all point to the possibility of everyone attaining to the same high standard as he who was "the friend of all and the enemy of none," but experience only too sadly demonstrates how rare it is that such a goal is reached.

The rites in connection with the Bishop's diocese were continued yesterday in the Cathedral up to the hour of the funeral. The watches which commenced on the previous evening were carried on by the clergy and others in turns. There were also three morning celebrations of the Holy Communion all of which were attended by members of the congregation. Upon the coffin, as it lay in front of the altar, loving hands placed beautiful wreaths and crosses of white everlastings, white roses and other flowers, until it was covered with the profuse collection which had come from both far and near. The removal of these, as the hour of the funeral approached, was performed with the utmost care in order that their delicate, graceful loveliness should not be marred, and with the exception of a few crosses, they were removed to the cemetery and placed in the vicinity of the grave.

More than an hour before the funeral service commenced, the people began to collect before the different approaches and within the Cathedral enclosure, and many of them immediately entered the edifice. Within, a surpliced priest, knelt before the flower-covered coffin, keeping watch over the sacred dead; several other members of the clergy in their cassocks, moved thither and thithernoiselessly finishing the arrangements for the funeral rites; whilst many of the men and women who came in and took their seats, sank upon their knees and remained in prayer as the bell tolled its mournful knell. Gradually the church filled. Anglicans, Roaman Catholics, Methodists, Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Salvationists - representatives of all the creeds outside the Church, enter the seats and long before the hour is come, the building is filled with such a congregation as has never been seen in it before, a congregation which is representative of all ranks - from His Excellency the Governor down to the lowliest in the city. As four o'clock strikes, the slow, measured tread of the choir and clergy is heard, and the vestry curtains part, some sixty men and boys issue in processional order and take their seats in their stalls. The beautiful and solemn Burial Service is conducted by Dean Goldsmith, the Rev. J. Allen reading the lesson, and the choir and congregation singing the 90th Psalm, and two of the most beautiful hymns of the Christian church, "When our heads are bowed with woe," with its pathetic pleading, and "Jesus lives, no longer now," the resurrection song of triumph. The mournful notes of the Dead March in Saul solemnly peal out from the organ, and the clergy and choir then leave the church, and passing down the broad path into the Terrace where the public have assembled in as great numbers as those that filled the church, they form in line and wait for the procession to form. The coffin is placed in the hearse, and slowly the procession moves off in the following order:-

The attempt to give anything like a full list of those present would be impossible, but among those who took part in the procession were the following: Sir George Shenton (President of the Legislative Council), Sir James G. Lee Steere (Speaker of the Legislative Assembly), Sir John Forrest, M.L.A. (Premier and Colonial Treasurer), Mr. S.H. Parker, M.L.C. (Colonial Secretary), Mr. S. Burt, M.L.A. (Attorney-General), Mr. A. Forrest, M.L.A. (Mayor of Perth), Mr. R.A. Sholl (Postmaster-General), Mr. O. Burt (Under-Secretary, Colonial Secretary's Department), Chief Justice Onslow, Mr. Justice Hensman, Mr. F.A. Moseley (Registrar of the Supreme Court), Mr. R.F. Sholl, M.L.A., Mr. D.B. Ord (Private Secretary, His Excellency the Governor), Lieut W.A. Stone, Mr. W. Durlacher, Mr. G.T. Poole (Colonial Architect), Mr. F.D. North, Lieut.-Colonel Forbes, Mr. G.W. Leake, M.L.C., Capt. J.C. Strickland, Mr. H. Strickland, sen., Mr. J. Hurst, Mr. G. Eliot, Mr. J.J. Harwood, Dr. Stewart, Mr. A.H. Williams, Mr. G. Hillman, Dr. Kelall, Mr. O.P. Stables, Mr. J.D. Booker, Mr. G. Leake (Crown Solicitor), Mr. J.B. Roe (Sheriff), Mr. F. Spencer (Auditor-General), Mr. H.S. Ranford, Mr. Howard Evans, Mr. E. Sholl, Mr. C.K. Courthope, Mr. E. Wigglesworth, Major Phillips (Commissioner of Police), Mr. H.C. Prinsep, Mr. J.F. Stone, Mr. S.S. Parker, Mr. F.C. Faulkner (Headmaster, High School), Mr. J.B. Percy, Mr. C. Lee Steere, Capt. T. Sherwood, Lieut. J. Talbot Hobbs, Mr. G. Glide, M.L.C., Mr. J.C.H. James (Commissioner of Titles), Mr. G. Parker, Mr. R.C. Clifton (Under-Secretary for Lands), Mr. G.A. Clifton, Mr. R.B. Burnside, Mr. H. Wainscott (Official Receiver), Mr. E.C. Salter, Mr. S.C. Steuart, The Rev. G.H. Rowe (Chairman Wesleyan Methodist District), Rev. E. Tremayne Dunstan (Pastor Trinity Congregational Church), Rev. B. Peters (Congregational Church, Fremantle), Commissioner Coombs, Staff-Captain Knight and Ensign Prance (Salvation Army), Lieut. J.A. Campbell, Lieut. J. Rose, Mr. W.E. Clifton, Mr. F.W. Moorhead, Mr. C.Y. Simpson, Mr. E.L. Courthope, Mr. P. Kelly, Captain E.W. Haynes, Mr. A.F. Thomson (Under-Secretary Works and Railway Department), Mr. H.C. Dartnall, Mr. H.D. Holmes, Mr. H.R. England, Mr. H.F. Johnston, Sir. Alexander Cockburn-Campbell, Mr. R. Wynne, Mr. W.S. Pearse, M.L.A, Mr. M.E. Jull, Mr. W. Nicholson, Mr. G.B. Sweeting, Mr. H.G. Stirling, Dr. Harvey, Mr. M.A.C. Fraser (Registrar-General), Mr. J. Hope, Mr. H. Hope, Mr. B.B. Renford, Mr. T.G. Molloy, M.L.A., Mr. H. McKernan, Mr. F.M. Stone, Mr. R. Taylor, Mr. A.P. Curtis, Mr. M.F.A. Canning, M.L.A., Mr. T.P. Draper, Mr. E. Snook, Mr. W. Snook, Mr. R. Wigglesworth, Mr. W. George, Mr. F.L. Hussey, Mr. L.S. Eliot (Under-Treasurer), Mr. C.H. Wilkinson, Mr. A.B. Kidson, Mr. E.C. Dean, Mr. E. Jackson, Mr. J. Bowra, Mr. A.D. Letch, Mr. J.F. Kevern (General Secretary Y.M.C.A., Perth), &c., &c.

The procession was accompanied by a body of mounted and foot police, who kept the streets free. As will be seen from the list we have given, which represents but a small portion of it, it was a very lengthy one, and reached from the Cathedral gates as far as Lord Street. It slowly wended its way along St. George's and Adelaide- terraces to Hill-street, along which it passed into Howick-street, and thence as far as Cemetery Avenue, and between the double line of eucalyptus trees on to the cemetery. A numerous gathering was in waiting in the vicinity of the grave. A the procession came in sight, the bell of St. Bartholomew's commenced to toll, and the approaches to the cemetery were cleared. Arrived at the burial ground the procession halted, and the coffin having been removed from the hearse was taken to the grave, and in the presence of the large assemblage which met there, committed to its last resting place. The greater part of the service there was again taken by Dean Goldsmith, Archdeacon Watkins taking the latter portions. The hymns "Days and moments quickly flying," and "Abide with me; fast falls the eventide," were sung by the choir with feeling. The coffin was a plain jarrah one. Along the entire length of the lid was placed a wooden cross, and a small plate fastened to the coffin gave the name of the deceased, the date of his birth, the date of his consecration as Bishop, and the date of his death. As the coffin was lowered into the grave, the Bishop's stole and purple hood which had remained upon it were removed, and then the remaining portion of the ceremony was concluded. The benediction pronounced by the Dean, the gathering slowly dispersed, though several friends and others remained behind to lay their floral tributes upon the grave of one whose decease is universally regretted.

Among those who sent crosses and wreaths to be placed on the coffin in the Cathedral or at the grave were the following:- His Excellency the Governor, Mr. and Mrs. A.E. Burt, the Rev. and Mrs. Orchard, Mr. and Mrs. McLarty, senr., Mr. A. Stang, Mr. and Mrs. S. Burt, Miss Spencer, Miss Ada Timperley, Mrs. Lovegrove, Miss J.M. Cummings, Dr. and Mrs. Lovegrove, Mr. and Mrs. W.H. James, Mr. and Mrs. A. Williams, Dr. and Mrs. Harvey, Mr. E.H. Gliddon, Mrs. Wittenoom, Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Stone, Mrs. Manning, Mrs. W.G. Hearman, mr. J.F. Stone, Miss E. Munro, Miss L. Thompson, Mrs. G.C. Knight, Mr. and Mrs. E. Wigglesworth, the Misses Eliot, Mr. and Mrs. E. Sholl, Mr. J.H. Cooper, Miss Dyson, Lady Cockburn-Campbell, Mrs. G.R. Turner, Mr. and Mrs. R.C. Clifton, Mr. and Mrs. F.C. Faulkner, Dr. and Mrs. Tratman, the Hon. A. O'G. and Mrs. Lefroy, Miss Keough, the Misses Cockburn-Campbell, the Chief Justice and Mrs. Onslow, Mr. Edward Shenton, Mrs. M.A. Gale, Mr. and Mrs. M.A.C. Fraser, mrs. H.S. Carey, Mr. E.B. Denton, Mrs Chase and family, the Misses Burges, major, Mrs. and the Misses Phillips, Mr. and Mrs. E.C. Salter, "S.W.," Mr. F.W. Roberts, Sir John and Lady Forrest, Mr. S. Hymus, Sir James and Lady Lee-Steere, Mrs. Parry, the Cathedral choir, Dean and Mrs. Goldsmith.

The funeral arrangements were admirably carried out under the supervison of Mr. W.C. Bowra.

[The West Australian, Sat. November 18, 1893, p3]

Services at Northam.

[By Telegraph.]

[From Our Correspondent.]

Northam, November 17.

Funeral services were held here yesterday afternoon in the Anglican Church, in connection with Bishop Parry's lamented death.

[The West Australian, Sat. November 18, 1893, p3]

God's Guest.

Wherefore wait ye at the door?
'Tis the Consecration Feast
Of our Bishop, - choir and priest
Do him reverence once more.

See, they part to give him way
As he cometh to the door -
Once he cometh, and no more,
After Consecration day

By the Font he passeth slowly, -
Think yon he would turn aside
Where the clear Baptismal tide
Figureth Love's Fountain Holy?

Softly through God's House he moves,
Slowly down the paved aisle;
And he doth not glance nor smile,
Passing through the Home he loves;

But he turneth to the East -
And he cometh to the choir,
Will they sing at his desire,
Joyous chorals of the Feast?

Surely he hath journeyed long;
They have laid him down to sleep;
Hush - the little lads do weep,
And they cannot raise a song.

On a fair white bed he lies,
All amid the chancel stars;
And no pain nor sorrow jars
His sweet swoon of Paradise.

Near God's Altar lies God's guest,
And the Cross all ills hath barred;
And deep love keeps holy ward
In the Chamber of his Rest.


H.E.C.

November 16th, 1893.

[The West Australian, Sat. November 18, 1893, p3]

Other Sources

PARRY, (Bishop) Henry Hutton, b. 18.12.1826, d. 15.11.1895, son of Thomas (Bishop of Barbados). Arr. possibly 26.5.1877 per Hastings, m. (1st) Elizabeth Mary THOMAS b. 1836 d. 11.11.1877 (Perth), m. (2nd) 15.4.1879 (Perth C/E) Mary Susanna ALEXANDER b. 14.9.1851 (widow nee Leake).

Chd. Henry Ernest b. 1856 (Barbados), Alfred Edward b. 1862 d. 1930, Mary Edith. (2nd wife), Theodore Hutton b. 1880 d. 1892 (drowned), George Herbert b. 1882 d. 1951, Lionel Walpole b. 1883, Maude Louisa Rose b. 1884.

Ordained 1852. Early service in Anglican Church at Barbados from 1863, Bishop-Coadjutor in 1868. Bishop of Perth 1870. Successor to Hale (was not on good terms with J.G. Steere or Burt). Opened Bishop's Boys' College for theological students, also est. a Girls' School & College 1878, both financial failures. Initiated the building of the Anglican Cathedral. Educ. Rugby & Balliol, Oxford. Visited Eastern Australia & returned per Ravenna 15.11.1881. Visited Eastern Australia & returned per Franklin 7.5.1884. To London 27.4.1886 per Sutlej.

[Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians: pre-1829-1888,
R. Erickson, 1988, vol.3, p.2420]


PARRY: Henry Hutton

Born 18th December 1826 in Antigua, the second son of Thomas Parry (then Archdeacon of Barbados) and Louisa nee Hutton. He was educated under the great Dr Arnold of Rugby and passed out on a scholarship to Balliol College Oxford. BA 1851, MA 1858, DD (Durham) 1876. Made Deacon 28th October 1851 and ordained Priest 1852 by h~s father, the Bishop of Barbados. 1851-1853: Curate Holy Trinity Trinidad [Barbados]. 1853-1854: Curate All Saints Trinidad. In 1854 he became a tutor at Codrington Theological College and he was appointed Archdeacon in 1861. In 1864 he became Administrator during his father's illness. He was consecrated Bishop in Whitehall Chapel London on 15th November 1868 by Archbishop Thompson of York, Bishop Tait of London, Bishop Bickersteth of Ripon and Bishop Parry of Barbados. Appointed Coadjutor Bishop of Barbados. His father died in 1871 and Henry Hutton succeeded him as Bishop but in 1874 he returned to the UK because of his wife's health. She was Elizabeth Mary nee Thomas (born 1830 died 11th November 1877 Perth). He was Locum Tenens at St. Neot's Huntingdon 1874 and Curate of Monckton Farley, Wiltshire 1875-1876, when the call came for Perth. He had previously been offered the Bishopric of Columbo but declined because of his wife's continued ill-health.

He was appointed to the Bishopric of Perth in 1876, at the age of fifty years, and on 5th May 1877 he arrived in the 'Hastings' with his wife and three children: Henry Ernest (born 1856), Alfred Edward (born 1862 died 1930) and Mary Edith. On 15th April 1879 he married Mary Susanna Alexander (born 1851 died 30th October 1909), the widowed daughter of the treasurer of the Cathedral Building Committee, Sir Luke Leake. There were four children of this union: Theodore Hutton (born 1880 drowned 1892), George Herbert (born 1882 died 1951), Lionel Walpole (born 1883 died 1954) who was also ordained and was Archdeacon of Perth in his latter years, and Maude Louise Rose (born 1884). In 1996 she married Archibald Sanderson.

Financial conditions were very difficult in the Diocese during Parry's time, exacerbated by the withdrawal of some of the Imperial Grants. Even the upkeep of Bishop's House was too much for the Episcopal purse. Yet it is to him that credit must go for the erection in 1888 of a worthy Cathedral for the Diocese. He experienced the usual round of difficulties with the clergy but greatest among these was the fracas over the Rev'd J.B. Gribble of 1885-1886. The Goldfields were beginning to grow as his capacity for work began to decline.

Bishop Parry ordained only seven men during his occupancy of the See of Perth: the Rev'd B.M. King as deacon on 25th April 1878 and priest in 1879, the Rev'd E.F. Parker (the first West Australian born ordinand) as deacon on 30th November 1882 and priest on 13th July 1884, the Rev'd W. Tait as deacon in May 1884 and priest on 28th July 1885, the Rev'd T.E. Pritchett as priest on 13th July 1884, the Rev'd J.E. Harston as deacon in 1887 and priest in June 1889, the Rev'd E.A. Wood as priest in 1888 and the Rev'd F.C. Gillett as deacon on Ascension Day 1891.

After two short illnesses, he died of acute pneumonia in the Bunbury Rectory on 15th November 1893 and, after services in St. George's Cathedral Perth, his remains were buried in East Perth Cemetery on the 17th. Obituaries were published in "The West Australian" on 16th and 17th November and a full account of his funeral on the 18th. The remains of his wives and son Theodore were also buried in the some grave on the east side of St. Bartholomew's Church. The Chancel Screen in St. George's Cathedral Perth was erected in his memory, along with that of his predecessor who was Bishop Hale.

REFERENCES

Bishop Parry's Diaries for 1877-1893 are held at the Battye Library: reference: [MN 134 Acc. 1223A/3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10]. There are also the originals and copies of various letters and sermons written by him as well as some biographical miscellany.

"Australian Dictionary of Biography" Volume 5 page 407

[Fr. E.W. Doncaster, Archivist for the Diocese of Perth]