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John Charles Horsey
JAMES

February 3, 1899



Biography | Grave Site | Inscription | Newspaper Reports | Other Material

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Biographical Details

















Description of Grave
James 1899, 1901:
Single site, one interment, one "memoriam". Vertical white marble gothic slab with decorative panel showing small latin cross inclined (down to north) with ivy intertwined. Lead lettering, condition good.

At least 1/3 of the headstone is buried. Probably daughter Madeline Clifton now obscued?

Surround: Wrought iron spiral rail on 6 ornamental verticals. Blue metal on site.

Click for larger image

Click for larger image

[East Perth Cemetery: Resting Place of Western Australian Pioneers, J.Richardson & D.Davies, 1986, vol.3, p.177]

Memorial Inscription
Sacred to the memory of John Charles Horsey James, for many years Commissioner of Land Titles, Western Australia, born 30.1.1841, died 3.2.1899. Also Rebecca Catherine, wife of the above whose mortal remains lie buried at Tiverton, Devon, England, born 23.10.1852, died 4.5.1901. Click for larger image

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Newspaper Accounts

Funeral Notices.

The Friends of the late Mr. John Charles Horsey James, late judge of the Supreme Court, are respectfully invited to follow his remains to the place of interment, the Church of England Cemetery, Perth. The funeral is appointed to leave his late residence, Romansleigh, Murray-street, Perth, at 9 o'clock THIS (Saturday) MORNING.

BOWRA and O'DEA,
Undertakers and Embalmers,
195 Pier-street, Perth.

Telephone No. 308.

[The West Australian, Sat. February 4, 1899, p4]

Death of Mr. J.C.H. James.

It is with profound regret that we record the death of Mr. J.C.H. James, Commisioner of Titles, which took place at his residence, "Romansleigh," Goderich-street, at nine o'clockyesterday morning. The deceased gentleman, as will be remembered, was attacked with illness last Wednesday fortnight. He had been ailing some time previously, and complained to his friends of increasing indiposition. Last Wednesday fortnight Mr. James became alarmingly ill, and was ordered perfect rest by his physicians, who pronouced him to be suffering of nervous exhaustion. Mr. James followed the advice of the doctors, and, after a few days, the report that he was improving in health led his many friends to hope that he would soon be perfectly restored. The heat of the past few days would seem to have been too much for him, however, and yesterday morning he was seized with a fit of apoplexy, which proved fatal. One of the saddest circumstances connected with his death was that his wife and family were not present. They left the colony on a visit to the mother country last year, and were among the passangers on board the R.M.S. China upon the eventful homeward voyage of that vessel.

James Francis John Charles Horsey James - for those were the full names of the subject of our notice, though he preferred to use only the latter three of his Christian names - was a son of the late Rev. J.H. James, of Highfield, near Lydney on Severn, Gloucester, and of Kilcott Barton, Romansleigh, North Devon, England. He was born in Rome in 1841, andwas educated at Rugby, and later at St. John's College, Oxford, where he took his B.A. degree in 1864. The present Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Temple was his master at Rugby. After finishing his university career, he chose the law as his profession, and, becoming a member of the Inner Temple, was called to the Bar in 1866. He practiced in the Oxford circuit, where he soon became known as one of the rising juniors.

As Commisioner of Titles.

In 1874, the Transfer of Land Act became law in this colony, and the office of Commissioner of Titles being created by that statute Mr. James was offered the position by his friend, the Earl of Carnarvon, who was then Secretary of State for the Colonies. Lord Carnarvon, in aquainting the Western Australian Government of the selection, spoke highly of the qualifications possessed by Mr. James, and the latter upon his arrival at this colony in July, 1875, recieved the appointment under the hands of the late Sir W.C.F. Robinson, The Governor of the day. The task before Mr. James was no small one. The Act had just come into existence, the new department had to be organised, and the whole machinery provided by the statue had to be set in operation. Mr. James threw himself into the task con amore, and the rapidity with which he completed all the arrangements necessary to the administration of his office testified as unmistakeably to his abilities as it did to the wisdom of Lord Carnarvon's choice. Year by year under his able guidance the office progressed in a manner which established him as one of the most capable officers in the public service of Western Australia, and when, ten years later, the big land boom set in, and the operations in land became unprecedentedly large in extent, and necessitated the employment of all is highly-trained faculties and legal acumen to deal with them, Mr. James, showed himself equal to the task, and though the work of the issue of titles fell somewhat into arrear, the fault lay with the need for an amendment of the Act and with the under manning of the Department, and not with its official chief, whose labours were unwearied. The necessity for an increased official staff was at last recognised and by dint of unceasing application on Mr. James's part, and with the cordial co-operation of the officers of his Department, he was at last enabled to exhibit to the public the successful result of their painstaking industry. One of his proudest reflections was the zealous, energetic, and intelligent discharge of their duties which was such an unfailing characteristic of his staff, and he used to point with pardonable pride to the fact that his Department was one of the paying departments of the State.

In Other Capacities.

Mr. James's experience of official life was not, however, limited to the Land Title Office. At various times he filled temporarily the offices Master and Registrar in Bankruptcy, and Police Magistrate of Perth, the last-named postition also involving the discharge of the functions of magistrate of Perth Local Court. In all these offices he won unqualified praise for th emanner in which he discharged his duties, were marked by the same self-sacrificing devoting that he exhibited in his capacity as Commissioner of Titles. Perhaps a better proof of this could not be found than that which he gave in 1897, when, owing to the growth of business in petty sessions and the Local Court, it became necessary to separate the two offices. Mr. James Cowan, who had been discharging the combined duties, was appointed to the Local Court magistracy, and the office of police magistrate was conferred upon Mr. James. The labour which this new appointment involved was quite sufficient for one man, but Mr. James continued to discharge the duties of Commissioner of Titles, carrying on the latter both before and after the court sat, and during hours when other Government officers had finished for the day. The position of Police Magistrate he reliquished upon Mr. Justice Stone obtaining leave of absence early last year, in order to visit the old country. Mr. James was appointed Puisne Judge, and, as already stated, continued to hold office till the return of Mr. Stone, when he went back to his old position of Commissioner of Crown Lands amid many expressions of regret by the members of the legal profession.

In 1887 - the colony then being under Downing-street Government - Mr. James was nominated by the late Sir Frederick Napier Broome - then Governor of Western Australia - to a seat in the Legislative Council as an official member of the Government. That seat he occupied for about two years, and proved himself a strong acquistion to the debating power of the official side of the House. In the amendment of the Transfer of Land Act - carried through Parliament under Responsible Government in 1893 - Mr. James took a prominent part, not, of course, as a legislator, as he had long ceased to sit in the Legislature, but the evidences of his progressive and painstaking ability were conspicuous in the drafting fo the new measure. Notwithstanding all these demands upon his time, he made opportunities to serve his country in other ways. The present revised edition of the local statutes was the work of his hands, and this and the indexing of the Acts he carried out with a completeness which left little if anything to be desired.

Diversified Gifts.

It was not only as a pubic officer that the deceased gentleman shone. He was a ripe scholar, and possessed literary gifts which would, now doubt, have secured him a prominent position in the world of letters had he chosen to exercise them. he delighted in art, and as a judge of music, painting, and sculpture, was unsurpassed in this colony. He also possesed the gift of poetry, and in the making of Latin versus he displayed a mastery of style and grace of expression which, built upon the model of his favourite poet, Horace, caused his poems his poems to be read with keen enjoyment by those upon whom the benifits of a classical education had been conferred. He was an enthusiastic lover of Shakespear, whose works, it might be said, he knew almost by heart; and his acquaintance with the works of the great host of the men of letters who have attained fame in early, mediaeval, and modern times was remarkable. Nor did he keep his learning to himself. No man loved better to share his gifts with his fellow-men: and in the earlier years of his career in Western Australia he took a prominant in many of the associations then existing for the improvement of the young, giving of his wealth of learning so liberally that among those who have attained to useful postitions in the community there are many young men who have cause to speak gratefully of the influence Mr. James exerted upon their lives, and the assistance which he rendered them in the developement of thier talents. It needs not to be said that he possessed remarkable histrionic ability. If among those who have made Western Australia their home in the latter days there are any who have had no opportunity of witnessing Mr. James on the ameteur stage, those who have known him longest have had frequent cause for enjoying the exhibition of talents which would have secured him a prominent place in the theatrical profession as a comedian possessing remarkable powers of characterisation.

As Sportsman.

Of Mr. James, too, it can be said that he was in every sense of the description a popular sportsman. He figured as the owner of more than one fair performer, the Eblis mare Dora being the last that carried his livery of black, yellow sleeves and cap prominently in 1897. The deceased sportsman was the sole owner of Dora, and he possessed also an interest in Miss Boolka and other well-known animals. For a lengthy term Mr. James officiated as a steward of the Western Australian Turf Club, only being superseded in that position by the action of the committee of the club, in May, 1897, in deciding to elect the five stewards from members of the committee. In correspondence that passed between himself and the chairman of the W.A.T.C. on the subject of the appointment of the five stewards and the superseding of himself, Sir John Forrest, Messrs. R.E. Bush and George Parker, and which was published in the West Australian in June, 1897, Mr. James expressed himself as feeling a "great and expressed slight." In his capacity of steward he had omitted his attendance at no race meeting, and had acted as chairman of more than one turf enquiry. In the correspondence referred to Mr. James questioned the validity and legality of the appointment of the stewards from the committee, on which point the chairman's contention in reply that the local turf body was racing forthwith under V.R.C. rules did not satisfy the late sportsman. Followers of racing generally knew and appreciated Mr. James. His wit brightened many a sporting social gathering and official meeting. He was present at the annual general meeting of the W.A. Turf Club in May, 1897, when the question of the appointment of a successor to Mr. J. Handran Smith, then talking of resigning his handicappership and secretaryship, was before the members. Speaking on the subject, Mr. James remarked that he did not know whether or not there was any duty on the article known as a handicapper, but he hoped that there was. Though his memory for turf dates and incidents latterly failed him Mr. James was an earnest and clever student of turf nomenclature. He was directly or indirectly responsible for the bestowal on young racehorses of very apt names, by which at a glance the pedigree of the animal could be traced. He was thoroughly a sportsman who indulged in racing for sport's sake, and rarely backed his horses in a race, his occasional investments being small in the extreme. For a number of years till recently, when judicial duties occupied so much of his time, his was a familiar figure at all W.A.T.C. race meetings, and latterly at Canning Park.

Nor was it in the "sport of kings" alone that he took part. Cricketers, in common with other classes of the community throughout the colony, will be grieved to learn of his death. For many years he took a most prominent part and keen interest in the welfare and promotion of the national game in this colony. For several years after his arrival in Western Australia, in 1875, Mr. James took an active part in cricket, and for four or five years captained the M.C.C. and Perth clubs. He was instrumental in the formation of the W.A. Cricket Association, and from the time of its inception in 1884 has continued to act as president. To his energies, coupled with those of Mr. Parker and others, cricketers may ascribe the possession of one of the finest grounds in Australia, the Association Cricket Ground, of which up to the time of his demise he was a trustee. In all matters tending to further the interests of the good old game Mr. James was to the fore. In other branches of sport also he was a recognised leading light, many athletic bodies owing their existence and prosperity to his energy and interest. He was also a member of the Hurlingham and Royal Western Yacht Clubs of England.

A Citizen.

Mr. James was connected with several of the public institutions of the colony. As a governor of the High School, he devoted much time to promoting the success of that institution. He was also a member of the committee of the Victoria Public Library, in which he took a deep interest. At one time, too, he was president of the Swan River Mechanics' Institute, and in 1887, on the occasion of the Queen's Jubilee, presented it with a finely-executed bas-relief portrait of Her Majesty. On the occasion of the 1897 Jubilee he presented all the State school children with enamelled cups.

Marriage.

Mr. James was married some years ago to Miss Rebecca Clifton, second daughter of the late Mr. C.H. Clifton, a prominent and much-esteemed public officer and colonist of Western Australia. By this marriage he had issue several sons, all of whom, with Mrs. James, survive him.

"Of Infinite Jest".

Mention has been made of Mr. James's histrionic gifts as a comedian. For these he was eminently adapted, for, as a wit and humourist, he was certainly among the foremost in the colony. A more genial, witty companion it would be difficult to find. His conversation was brilliant with epigram and overflowed with humour. He was indeed "a fellow of infinite jest," and delighted in entertaining his friends with guip and crank which never failed to arouse mirth. He had not been more than a month or so in the colony when, at a banquest given in honour of a well-known Australian explorer, the late Mr. Ernest Giles, he delivered a speech on the toast of "The Ladies," which won for him the remark that it occupied an honourable place next to Mark Twain's well-known humourous post-prandial speech on the same subject. To tell of all his jokes would be impossible, but a few of his witticisms may be mentioned.

A few years ago, when the Irwin coal discoveries were attracting attention, a company promoter approached Mr. James with a view to inducing him to take shares. The promoter, whom we will call Mr. X., said: "As you have heard, Mr. James, I am entitled to speak as an expert, and I give you my opinion that the discovery at the Irwin is a true seam of coal. A friend of mine, too, Mr. Taylor, has had a large experience in coal in England, and will tell you the same." "I am sure, Mr. X., if there was any other opinion than your own needed," replied Mr. James, "I could not do any better than take your friend's, for than a Taylor I know no better authority on seams."

Upon another occasion Mr. James was taking part in an amateur performance in Perth. While behind the scenes during one of the intervals the cry of an infant was heard issuing from the gallery. Mr. James heard it, and at once began to hum the chorus of a well-known song, with a slight alteration to suit the occasion, "Did you ever hear a wail (whale)?"

Early last year a trial of the Collie coal was made on the steamer Manx Fairy, and after the trial followed speech-making and refreshments. Mr. James, who was amongst those present, discovered in Shakespeare a quotation referring to the coal industry, and appropriate to illustrate that the Collie coal seams were no mere semblance. The quotation, he said, was to be found in "Hamlet," and was - "Seems, madam; nay, it is. I know not seems."

Yet one more instance. A few weeks ago a friend met him after he had retired from the judicial bench, a retirement which was said to be somewhat disappointing to himself. Said the friend, "I see you are not taking a holiday like some of the other judges?" "No," was the reply. "The Ministry have not only taken from me my vocation, but they have also deprived me of my vacation."

Mr. James and the Reporters.

To Pressmen Mr. James was at all times unfailingly considerate. Fine points of law, unintelligible to a layman he, after the rising of the police court, was ever ready to explain and put in such form as would be clear to all. As a source of information on proceedure or details of practice Mr. James would spend odd quarters-of-hours explaining matters. "For," as he once said, "reporters should always be accurate. No, no, it's not wasting my time if you have learnt something." But it was a source of "good copy" that the reporter watched for his sayings. When he sat as Police Magistrate the dreary task of hearing a series of cases arising out of the quarrels of neighbours or the litigious proclivities of Afghans would be sure to be enlivened by flashes of droll humour from him or quaint comments on the doings and sayings of the passing show. The actions prompted by the kind heart he possessed often came to the ears of the pressmen in his court. After fining an unfortunate rather than an offending prisoner, not only has he paid the fine, but supplemented it with that which sent the object of his pity on his way rejoicing. One of the last acts for which he was responsible was the establishment in the Police and Local Court rooms of money boxes, into which the charitably inclined habitues of the court might drop a coin in aid of the poor.

The Feeling in the City.

The intelligence of the death of Mr. James was received with many expressions of regret in the city, and as a mark of respect the municipal flag was half-masted at the Town Hall. Immediately upon hearing of the death, Mr. F.D. North, the Premier's private secretary, telegraphed the sad news to Sir John Forrest in Melbourne. The Premier at once replied, expressing his sincere sympathy, and asking Mr. North to represent him at the funeral.

After the City Police Court adjourned yesterday, for lunch, Mr. A.S. Roe, P.M., joined Mr. Cowan on the bench in the Local Court.

Mr. Cowan said that the Bench had just heard with deep regret of the death of Mr. James, who was until recently an acting-Judge of the Supreme Court. He had intended to adjourn the court, out of respect, but as Mr. James had not held his judicial position at the time of his demise, and on account of the pressure of business, he had decided to offer an expression of condolence. He gave his testimony to the esteem in which the deceased gentleman was held through the excellent qualities of his character.

Mr. Roe said that sitting as the Police Magistrate of the City Police Court, he desired to pay a tribute to the memory of him who had passed away. His social as well as his professional attainments had rendered him one for whom nothing but feelings of the deepest regard and respect could be entertained by all with whom he came in contact.

Mr. Ewing, on behalf of the Bar, testified to the respect and regard in which Mr. James was held by himself and his learned friends.

At a meeting of the committee of the W.A. Cricket Association, last night, feeling references were made to the death of Mr. James, who filled the dual capacity of trustee to and president of the Association. Mr. F.D. North, in moving a motion expressing regret at the news of the late gentleman's demise, said he was sure that it was with great regret that the association committee had learnt of the death of their president. He knew the sincere regard in which Mr. James had been held by the members of this committee, and could testify to the indefatigable interest that the late gentleman had shown in connection with cricket, and particularly in regard to the work of the association. He would move that a letter expressing the association's sympathy in their sad bereavement should be forwarded to the widow and family of Mr. James.

Mr. A. Lovekin seconded the motion. He endorsed all that Mr. North had said in eulogy of the late gentleman, who had, he could well remember, been one of the three, Mr. North and himself being the others, who had waited on Governor Broome some years ago and made application to secure the present association ground. Mr. James had done a great deal for cricket and for the association, which he had helped to finance and bring to its present sound condition.

The motion was carried.

Statement by the Acting-Premier.

The Acting-Premier, speaking to a reporter of the West Australian yesterday with reference to the death of Mr. James, said that the Government would have only been too anxious to have enabled Mr. James to enjoy a rest if this were necessary for his restoration to health, and to have afforded facilities for him to leave the colony for a time. He had been spoken to by the Attorney-General on the previous day on the matter, which he had also discussed with the Registrar of Titles. They thought that this was, however,perhaps more a matter of arrangement with his own friends. Any decision the latter arrived at with the view to Mr. James leaving the colony for a time for the purpose of recruiting his health the Government would of done all it could to assist. It was very great surprise and regret that he recieved the announcement of his sudden death. He had thought that the malady from which he was suffering would be of temporary duration, and that he would shortly be restored to health. Had Mr. James not been able to take up his duties again he would have recieved every consideration at the hands of the Government in the matter of a pension.

The Funeral.

The funeral will take place at nine o'clock this morning, when the body of the deceased gentleman will be conveyed from its present resting place, Romansleigh, Goderich-street, to the Anglican cemetery.

[The West Australian, Sat. February 4, 1899, p7]

Funeral of the Late Mr. J.C.H. James.

The funeral of the late Mr. J.C.H. James, Commissioner of Titles, on Saturday morning, was oneof the largest attended that has taken place for a very long while, the head of the procession entering Forrest-avenue before the last of it had left Romansleigh, in Goderich-street. The coffin was of highly polished jarrah, with unobtrusive brass mountings, and bearing a plainly engraved inscription of the name and age of the deceased gentleman, and the date of his death. Covered with a number of wreaths sent by several of his more intimate friends, officers of his Department and members of clubs to which Mr. James, in his lifetime belonged, the coffin was placed in the hearse, and escorted by a detachment of police, was conveyed to the Anglican Cemetery, in East Perth. The pallbearers were Mr. Justice Stone, Mr. Justice Hensman, Mr. A.E. Burt, Registrar of Titles, Mr. J.B. Roe, Sheriff of Western Australia, Mr. H.T. Prinsep, Under-Secretary Aborigines Department, Colonel Phillips, Commissioner of Police, and Captian J.F. Campbell, Deputy Master of the Perth Branch of the Royal Mint. The chief mourners were Mr. C. Leonard Clifton (brother-in-law), Master Gordon Clifton and Mr. C. Knight (nephews of the deceased.) Upon arriving at the enterance to the cemetery, the procession was met by the Very Rev. F. Goldsmith, Dean of Perth, who performed the burial rites, and at the conclusion of the service a number of those who had follwed remained behind to take a last look at the coffin which enclosed the earthly remains of their deceased friend. His Excellency the Governor sent his carriage, and the Premier was represented in the procession by his private secretary, Mr. F. D. North, Sir John Forrest being at present absent in Melbourne. Among thoe who followed the hearse to the grave were representatives of the Western Australian Turf Club, Canning Park Turf Club, Metropolitan Turf Club, Western Australian Cricket Association, and other institutions of which Mr. James had been a member. The procession also included the following:- Mr. F.H. Piesse, M.L.A., Acting-Premier; Mr. G. Randell, M.L.C., Colonial Secretary; Mr. R. Pennefather, Attorney-General; Mr. R.A. Sholl, Postmaster- General; Mr. R.F. Sholl, J.P.; Mr. J. Morrison, J.P.; Mr. F. Illingworth, M.L.A.; Mr. C.Y. O'Connor, Engineer-in-Chief; Dr. Lovegrove, City Coroner; Mr. W.J. George, M.L.A.; Mr. F.A. Moseley, Master of the Supreme Court; Mr. H.F. Johnston, Surveyor-General; Mr. F. Spencer, Auditor-General; Mr. A.S. Roe, Police Magistrate; Mr. J.L. Clarke, Official Receiver in Bankruptcy; Mr. J.S. Battye, Librarian Victoria Public Library; Mr. L.S. Eliot, Under-Treasurer; Mr. R.C. Clifton, Under-Secretary for Lands; Mr. G. Eliot, Acting- Under-Secretary, Colonial Secretary's Department; Mr. F. Wilson, M.L.A.; Mr. W.T. Lowton, M.L.C.; Mr. S.H. Parker, Q.C.; Mr. S. Burt, Q.C., M.L.A.; Mr. R. Pether, Government Printer; Mr. R. Wynne, Manager Post Office Savings Bank; Mr. F.C. Faulkner, head master of the High School; Dr. H.F. Harvey, Dr. A. Saw, Messrs. H.G. Anstey, F.R. Barlee, F.M. Alcock, G. Dent, sen., J.H. Smith, A.P Curtis, George Clifton, Gervase Clifton, M.F. Cavanagh, G. Parker, E.S. Barker, G.C. Money, C.Y. Simpson, O.P. Stables, C. Dent, R.D. Hardey, and the following officers of the Land Titles Department:- Mr. W.A. Saw, inspector of plans; M.C. Hogarth, inspector of surveys; Mr. A.G. Harvey, acting assistant registrar of titles; Mr. A.G. Dartnell, accountant; and the following other officers: Messers. G. Barrett, Stevens, Birch, E.G. Dartnell, Cook, Saunders, Willett, A.F. Smith, G.F. Smith, Body, Gibbs, Taylor, Bennecke, Tiller, Jones, Fitzpatrick, Carrick, Webb, Stevenson, Fawckner, Mann, Rain, Ralston, and Walker. Wreaths were sent by the following: Mr. and Mrs. C. Leonard Clifton and family, Mrs G.C. Knight, Captain and Mrs. J.F. Campbell, Dr., Mrs., and the Misses Lovegrove, officers of the Lands Titles Department, Sir John and Lady Forrest, the chairman and the committee of the Western Australian Turf Club, the members of the Canning Park Turf Club, the members Western Australian Cricket Association, Mr. J.L. Clarke, the members of the Weld Club, the officers of the Bankruptcy and Intestacy Divisions of the Supreme Court. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messers. Bowra and O'Dea, Perth.

[The West Australian, Mon. February 6, 1899, p7]

In Memoriam.

J.C.H James, Born 1841, Died February 3rd, 1899.

Rome's son by birth, scholar, statesman, judge,
Yet kindly, courteous man, and versitile withal,
Rest peacful thou from labour's toil and drudge,
Whilst mourners press around thy funeral pall,
As "Titles James" afar thoughout our "golden" land,
Synonymous thy name with noble actions known.
To manly games and sport thou lent a helping hand;
In ways innumerable thy charity was shown.
Shine brilliant sun, as, standing by his tomb,
We weave our garland to the true and brave.
Green may his memory be, his deeds far fresher bloom
Than choicest flowerettes strewn upon his grave.

WM. J. FERGUSON.
Perth, February 4.

[The West Australian, Mon. February 6, 1899, p7]

Other Sources

JAMES, John Charles Horsey, b. 1841 (Rome), son of Rev. J.H. (of Gloucester), m. 16.9.1885 (Perth C/E) Rebecca Catherine CLIFTON b. 23.10.1852 (W.A.) d. 4.5.1901 (England), dtr. of Charles Hippuff & Maria (nee Glynn).

Chd. Evelyn Harold Clifton, Percival Arthur Clifton, Eustace Alfred Clifton, Theodosia Madeline Clifton, Rosamund Clifton, Meredith Charles Clifton, Meyrick Edward Clifton.

Perth, Commissioner of Land Titles (Govt. Gazette 1875-1890). Employed a T/L man 1877. Visited London with wife & 2 chd. 1-11.1888. MLC 6.1887, retired 2.1888. President of W.A. Cricket Association. Educ. Rugby & Oxford B.A.

[Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians: pre-1829-1888,
R. Erickson, 1988, vol.2, p.1618]