Stephen E. Jones

Shroud of Turin quotes: Unclassified quotes: March 2008

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The following are quotes added to my Shroud of Turin unclassified quotes in March 2008. See copyright conditions at end.

[Index: Jan, Feb, Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov, Dec]


21/03/2008
"General coincidences According to tradition, both the Sudarium of Oviedo and the Shroud of Turin are 
relics of Christ. A series of determining coincidences have been discovered in various specialities of 
scientific research. Both cloths were used on a man with a beard, moustache and long hair. The 
correspondence between various anatomical aspects of the two faces is good, such as the nose and the 
nostrils, the eyebrows, the size of the mouth and chin and even the shape of the beard ... Both the Shroud 
and the Sudarium clearly show death by crucifixion, and in the case of the Sudarium the subject died in an 
upright position after torture that caused a pulmonary oedema, perfectly compatible with crucifixion, as both 
hanging and being impaled on a stake can be eliminated. Both subjects bled through the nose and mouth. 
The blood is postmortem and lifeblood in the same areas on both cloths. Both subjects underwent torture 
that is recognisable as being crowned with thorns, leaving lifeblood flows on the nape of the neck. When a 
photograph of the Sudarium is superimposed on the nape area of the Shroud the geometric coincidence 
between the stains is 75%. Possible discrepancies are due to the fact that the Shroud is not creased in this 
area while the Sudarium is. The blood group on both is the scarce AB. The chances of the blood group 
coinciding is approximately one in a thousand ... and it does coincide. There are other signs too that the 
Sudarium of Oviedo was used on the Man on the Shroud. The Man's hair on the Shroud remains next to the 
cheeks in spite of the horizontal position of the body, and this is explained by the fixative effect the 
Sudarium had, holding the hair in that position for over two hours of use." (Barta, C., "The Sudarium of 
Oviedo and the Man on the Shroud's ponytail," British Society for the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 66, 
December 2007, pp.2-9, pp.2-3. Emphasis original) 

21/03/2008
"The ponytail on the Shroud We would like to add to these coincidences the presence of the matted hair 
tied up in a ponytail on the Man of the Shroud. It is easy to see the back of the hair on the Shroud image. If 
we look carefully and use the reinforced negative image, we can clearly see long hair falling from the bottom 
of the nape of the neck to the space between the shoulder blades .... The hair looks very much like a ponytail 
and yet we cannot see anything that is holding it in such a position. ... However, it would seem unlikely that 
the subject's hair would remain in place after the torture suffered. Furthermore, there is no evidence of 
anytholding the ponytail in pos held thus? We believe there is a simpler and 
more probable solution that comes from the use of the Sudarium of Oviedo on the Man on the Shroud's 
head; the so-called `ponytail' is the result of the Sudarium being placed and sewn around the hair on the 
back of the head to hold it in place." (Barta, C., "The Sudarium of Oviedo and the Man on the Shroud's 
ponytail," British Society for the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 66, December 2007, pp.2-9, pp.3-4. Emphasis 
original)

21/03/2008
"The ponytail on the Sudarium There is a stain in the lower left corner of the obverse of the Sudarium that 
looks like the silhouette of a butterfly ... . It is just below the stain dots on the nape of the neck and can be 
reproduced in the laboratory when bloodstained cotton is wrapped in linen and pressure is applied to it .... 
The cotton is like a lock of compressed hair and the butterfly stain corresponds to the ponytail. The 
presence of this unique lock of hair is indeed a point of coincidence between the two cloths, but its origin 
lies precisely in the way the Sudarium of Oviedo was used on the victim. The most likely sequence of use 
begins by placing the edge of the cloth on the right of the nape of the neck with the lower corner slightly 
below the cervical vertebrae, thus covering the back of the neck and the top of the head. The rest of the 
Sudarium covered the left ear, the nose and mouth and reached the right cheek. It was then folded back 
again on the nose and mouth. The right ear was left uncovered in the first phase. In order to hold the cloth 
in this position it was sewn with linen thread (some is still left) to the hair on the back of the head. This can 
be deduced by sets of two holes relatively parallel from the bloodstains to the butterfly stain .... The sewing 
holes do not only cover the area between the stains but the strains themselves and then they go a few 
centimetres further on each side. The holes are conical and we can thus deduce where the needle went in 
and where it came out again. There was a matted lock of hair between the linen and the stitches for 
approximately two hours .... Dirty hair impregnated with blood and sweat held in this position for two hours 
would leave it firmly in place. The author has carried out various experiments of the process of what 
happened to Jesus' hair during the passion. Volunteers' hair was covered with serum, dust and blood and it 
was seen that it became firm when the blood originally from the thorns dried ..." (Barta, C., "The Sudarium of 
Oviedo and the Man on the Shroud's ponytail," British Society for the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 66, 
December 2007, pp.2-9, pp.4-6)

21/03/2008
"A series of stains were produced in the corner of the Sudarium in this position that we shall now describe. 
A series of small bloodstains can be seen towards the lower left corner of the reverse side, which were 
produced by small sharp objects that could very well correspond to a crown of thorns, as mentioned in the 
gospels. These stains consist of lifeblood, i.e. the blood was shed while the subject was still alive, it stained 
the hair and before drying soaked the part of the Sudarium that was placed over the nape of the neck. The 
blood soaked through the cloth and can also be seen on the right hand side of the obverse. The stains 
correspond to those in the same area of the Shroud in size, number, shape and blood type. We thus have a 
reference point to compare the adjacent zones on both cloths. The butterfly stain is about 10cm below the 
stains on the nape of the neck on the Sudarium. In spite of its being close to the lifeblood on the nape of the 
neck, this stain consists of post mortem blood. The different nature of the two fluids is evident when they 
are illuminated with infrared light. The butterfly stain disappears while those on the nape of the neck are still 
visible .... Invisibility under infrared light is a characteristic that the butterfly stain shares with the main 
central stains, which could suggest a common origin. It could be the same mixture of pulmonary oedema 
fluid and blood that flowed out of the nose and mouth when the body was lying face up. In that position the 
fluid came out of the right of the mouth and ran down to the lower part of the jaw, the right of the neck and 
dripped down onto the lowest point of the cervical area. This became the central part of the butterfly stain 
on the Sudarium .... A small stain is visible on the same area of the Shroud, whose nature has not been 
defined and it could correspond to the point where the oedema fluid passed through the matted hair ..." 
(Barta, C., "The Sudarium of Oviedo and the Man on the Shroud's ponytail," British Society for the Turin 
Shroud Newsletter, No. 66, December 2007, pp.2-9, pp.6-8)

21/03/2008
"We conclude that the hair was pulled back and sewn to the Sudarium on the back of the head. When the 
Sudarium was removed the ponytail shape would remain as the hair was not washed. When the dead body 
was placed inside the Shroud, the ponytail was recorded by the image formation process. The lock of hair 
defined by the use of the Sudarium could therefore be the Shroud's ponytail. This explanation was 
unexpectedly confirmed while overlaying the stains on the nape of the neck on the two cloths. We had to 
turn the Sudarium 19, and in this position the stained corner of the Sudarium lies just over the sideways 
movement in the ponytail on the Shroud. ... the hair falls down from the left of the head towards the centre of 
the back and just where the edge of the Sudarium would be the ponytail moves sideways to fall vertically. 
The Oviedo cloth would have held the hair sideways and from that point the hair was free to fall straight. 
This also explains the shape of the ponytail on the Shroud. ... The presence of the peculiar lock of hair on 
the dorsal image of the Shroud is further proof of the use of the Sudarium of Oviedo on the head of the Man 
of the Shroud. " (Barta, C., "The Sudarium of Oviedo and the Man on the Shroud's ponytail," British Society 
for the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 66. December 2007, pp.2-9, pp.8-9) 

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Created: 30 January, 2008. Updated: 30 March, 2010.

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