Stephen E. Jones

Shroud of Turin quotes: Unclassified quotes: October 2009

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The following are quotes added to my Shroud of Turin unclassified quotes in October 2009. See copyright conditions at end.

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8/10/2009
"Astonishing as the claim may seem, there is strong inferential reason to think that, yes, the Shroud is 
authentic, and, yes, the face on the cloth shows us exactly what Christ looked like. A bit of history may be 
useful to most readers." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in 
his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"The modern history of the Shroud might be said to have begun on May 8, 1898, when Secondo Pia was 
permitted to photograph the Shroud for the first time while it was being exhibited at the Cathedral in Turin. 
Pia was flabbergasted to find that his glass-plate photographic negative was turning out in the developing 
bath to show, in fact, a photographic positive image. The Shroud itself had somehow been stained in such a 
way that the body imprint on the cloth was a negative. This feature alone would seem to rule out the claim 
that the Shroud is an ancient or medieval forgery. What artist, centuries before, would have fabricated 
details that could only be discerned with the help of a nineteenth-century invention? And the photographic 
process, subsequently confirmed by the photographs taken by G. Enrie in 1931, brought out a wealth of 
hitherto concealed details." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid 
in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"The Shroud, when photographed in 1898, had been in Turin over three hundred years, having been 
brought there from France by Emmanuel Philibert of Savoy in 1578. The House of Savoy obtained it in 1452 
when Margaret de Charny presented it to the then Duke of Savoy who relinquished two castles in exchange. 
It was kept in the Sainte Chapelle of Chambéry, there to be partly burned by the melting silver reliquary in a 
fire on December 3, 1532. (Today, the scorch marks, water stains, and repair patches are quite obvious.) 
Margaret's grandfather, Geoffrey de Charny, had founded a collegiate church at Lirey in 1353 where the `true 
Burial Sheet of Christ' was exposed for veneration around 1357. But Geoffrey, who died in 1356, had never 
been very explicit about how he obtained it. (And as Werner Bulst S.J. wrote in 1957: `... the possibility of 
acquiring the Shroud by unethical methods ... is not to be lightly rejected. It was a rather usual method of 
securing relics in the Middle Ages.')" (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus 
Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Some 150 years earlier, the armies of the Fourth Crusade, well diverted from their original goal, seized 
Constantinople in 1204. After sacking the city without mercy, the fabulous treasures were divided with their 
financiers. According to a prearranged plan the Venetians would get half of the Crusaders' conquests. In 
this foray, Venice obtained not only a section of Constantinople, which included the church of St. Sophia, 
but more than enough to extend her commercial supremacy. Islam was not the hindrance to the profitable 
trade in the Near East; the Byzantine Empire was. A chronicler of that Crusade, Robert de Clari, is quoted as 
slating that in the imperial church, Our Lady Saint Mary of Blachernae, `...where was the shroud in which 
Our Lord was wrapped which was stretched straight up every Friday, so that one could well see on it the 
figure of Our Lord; nobody knew, neither Greek nor Frank, what became of this shroud when the town was 
taken.'" (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," 
National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"A figured shroud known in the East in 1204; a figured shroud known in the West by about 1357-a gap 
which has not yet been bridged. However, 1204-1357 is no definitive period of demarcation, for through and 
around this hiatus in history stream other trappings of civilization. Intermingled with art forms, varied 
traditions, customs, and rumor are extant documented references to the burial linens of the Passion. Two of 
the earlier ones are cited as being the testimony of Arculph, who claims to have kissed the `Lord's winding 
sheet' in Jerusalem around 640; and St. Braulio writes, in 631, that the Shroud was then a known relic." 
(Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," _National 
Review_, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"But how was the image on the cloth, the remarkable detail of which showed up only when photographed at 
the end of the nineteenth century, actually produced centuries ago? Intrigued by Pia's photographs, a 
French scientist named Paul Joseph Vignon developed a hypothesis that has commanded some widespread, 
though not universal, support. It is known that the normal Jewish burial service in the time of Jesus made 
use of myrrh and aloes, ground into a kind of paste, which impregnated the burial shroud. Vignon showed 
that this combination of chemicals produced a substance highly sensitive to urea. The human body exudes 
urea profusely upon death, and especially when death is accompanied by great suffering. In Vignon's 
theory, the exuded urea reacted upon the paste to produce discoloration of the cloth." (Sullivan, B.M., 
"Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 
1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Since 1898, scholars have been investigating every detail of the Shroud as shown in numerous 
photographs. Dark stains, clearly visible, mark the crown of thorns - evidently more a cap-like affair than the 
more familiar circlet. The spear-thrust shows up as a lentil-shaped wound on the right side.
Interestingly, the Shroud shows that the nails went through the wrists, not the palms, according to another 
French scientist. Dr. Pierre Barbet, a surgeon who brought his expertise to bear on the Shroud, embodied his 
conclusions in a chilling study, _A Doctor at Calvary_, available now in paperback translation. Some of his 
points: Experiments with cadavers showed that a body suspended with a nail through the palms will tear 
loose but that there is a narrow passage through the wrists (the carpal area) that would support body 
weight. No doubt, the Roman executioners were aware of this from their experience with crucifixion. Again, it 
was noticed that the hands on the Shroud appear to lack thumbs. Studies showed that when a nail was 
driven through that particular point in the wrist, the thumbs dropped inward upon the palm." (Sullivan, B.M., 
"Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 
1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"According to Barbet, the Shroud shows that prior to taking up the Cross, Jesus was subjected to two 
drastic forms of punishment. First, he was severely beaten with a stick about 1.75 inches in diameter. 
`Excoriations are to be found everywhere on the face, but especially on the right side.' Barbet found 
`haematomas beneath the bleeding surfaces.' The nose `is deformed by a fracture of the posterior of the 
cartilage.' The marks show that the stick was `vigorously handled by an assailant standing on the right of 
Jesus.' After that, he was subjected to scourging by two men employing the well-known Roman `flagrum,' a 
leather whip featuring small balls of metal or bone designed to tear the skin. Barbet finds more than fifty 
such strokes. `All the wounds have the same shape, like a little halter about three centimeters long. The two 
circles represent the balls of lead ... We may assume that during the scourging he was completely naked, for 
the halter-like wounds are to be seen all over the pelvic region, which would otherwise have been 
protected... . Finally, there must have been two executioners. It is possible they were not of the same height, 
for the obliqueness of the blows is not the same on each side.'" (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of 
Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 
24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Surgeon Barbet is especially vivid when he comes to the effect of those nails driven through the passage 
in the wrist, and so necessarily damaging the median nerves: "The median nerves are not merely the motor 
nerves, they are also the great sensory nerves. When they were injured and stretched out on the nails in 
those extended arms like the strings of a violin on their bridge, they must have caused the most horrible 
pain. Those who have seen, during the war, something of the wounds of the nervous trunks, know that it is 
one of the worst tortures imaginable." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus 
Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"The spear-thrust, according to Barbet, was a coup de grace required by law in this form of execution. But 
by that time Jesus had expired as the result of a tetanic contraction of the muscles that quickly reached the 
'respiratory system. The "condemned man could only escape from asphyxia by straightening himself on the 
nail through the feet, in order to lessen the dragging of the body on the hands; each time that he wished to 
breathe more freely or to speak, he had to raise himself on this nail, thus bringing on further suffering." But 
such exertions, says Barbet, made the tetanic reaction inevitable, and, he concludes, Jesus died from 
asphyxia." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," 
National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Some have argued that, yes, indeed, the Shroud appears to depict a man who had been so executed, but, 
they object, could the portrait be that of some other unfortunate? After all, countless persons of all sorts 
were executed by crucifixion. The Shro. The Shroud may well be ancient but why assume that the face is that of Jesus? 
This line of argument is quite possibly mistaken. The body represented on the Shroud can have been 
wrapped in the garment only a few days at most, for normal decompold have destroyed the image. 
In the ancient world, the dead were not ordinarily disturbed, because the decomposing body was 
considered unclean." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his 
tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Wherever you turn, the evidence argues for authenticity, often in quite unpredictable ways. It has long 
been observed, for example, that the physiognomy 'of Christ in portraits changed sharply around the year 
300. But the new way of depicting him contains details which are apparently inexplicable such as a curious 
rectangular design over the nose, or a random spot of blood. We now see that these new features 
correspond to details on the Shroud. Perhaps the Shroud was taken from the original tomb to Rome, where 
during the period of persecution it was kept closely guarded by the Christian community. Only when the 
Christian church felt reasonably secure could the holy object be made available to pious artists: Hence, the 
sudden change in the style of depicting Christ in religious art." (Sullivan, B.M., "Reading the Shroud of 
Turin: How in fact was Jesus Christ laid in his tomb?," National Review, July 20, 1973, Reprinted March 
24, 2005)

8/10/2009
"Garlaschelli and his team, who were funded by an Italian association of atheists and agnostics, created 
their image by placing the linen over a volunteer before rubbing it with a pigment called ochre with traces of 
acid. The linen was then `aged' by heating it in an oven and washing it with water. Reuters reports that the 
team then added blood stains, burn holes and water stains to finalize their product. CNA spoke with Dr. 
John Jackson who runs the Turin Shroud Center of Colorado and is a physics lecturer at the University of 
Colorado at Colorado Springs. Jackson led a team of 30 researchers in 1978 who determined that the shroud 
was not painted, dyed or stained. He explained to CNA that that based off the Reuters report as well as 
photos of Garlaschelli's shroud on the internet, it appeared that it doesn't exactly match the Shroud of Turin. 
Dr. Jackson first questioned the technique used by Garlaschelli's team, taking issue with the method of 
adding blood after aging the cloth. Jackson explained that he has conducted `two independent observations 
that argue that the blood features on the shroud' show `that the blood was on it first, then the body image 
came second.' Dr. Keith Propp, a physicist who is also a colleague of Jackson's, told CNA that while 
Garlaschelli's shroud `does create an image that could've been done in medieval times,' there are a many 
things that `are not consistent with what the actual shroud shows us.' For example, he continued, we know 
that the blood contacted the shroud before the body `because there's no image beneath the shroud.' He 
added that this image pattern would be difficult to duplicate `because it would ruin the blood stains.' " 
("Experts question scientist's claim of reproducing Shroud of Turin," Catholic News Agency, October 6, 
2009)

8/10/2009
"Another area concern for the scientists is the three dimensionality of the shroud. Propp explained that 
while Garlaschelli's cloth does have some aspects of light and dark to create a three- dimensional 
perspective, `it's nowhere near as sophisticated as the shroud' and that `it misses out on the accuracy and 
subtleties that are in the actual image.' Dr. Jackson from the Turin Shroud Center also touched on the same 
point, saying, `The shroud's image intensity varies with' the distances in between the cloth and the body. 
While he admitted that the images of Garlaschelli's shroud on the internet look authentic, when taken from a 
3-D perspective, `it's really rather grotesque.' `The hands are embedded into the body and the legs have 
unnatural looking lumps and bumps,' he explained." ("Experts question scientist's claim of reproducing 
Shroud of Turin," Catholic News Agency, October 6, 2009)

8/10/2009
"Jackson noted that he or his colleagues would be open to testing the Garlaschelli shroud or any other `idea 
about the shroud relative to the scientific characteristics that have been documented in respect to the 
shroud,' however to do so they would need `more detailed information about what was specifically done.' 
Garlachelli's technique has also received criticism from other experts. One scientist from the Shroud Science 
Group, a private forum of about 100 scientists, historians and researchers provided CNA with some of the 
critiques made in the forum. One English-speaking expert explained that the blood used on the Shroud of 
Turin is not whole blood. `They didn't just go out and kill a goat and paint the blood on the cloth. The blood 
chemistry is very specific,' he said explaining that the blood is from `actual wounds.' He added that most of 
the blood on the shroud flowed after death. `The side wound and the blood that puddles across the small of 
the back are post-mortem blood flows,' he said, adding that blood flowing after death `shows a clear 
separation of blood and serum.' Propp added, `In some ways, it comes out better than most others I've seen 
before. Still there are too many things - the shroud is more than just the image.' Jackson also pointed out 
that Garlaschelli's findings have yet to be peer reviewed. What scientists need `to do is present their work 
for publication before their peers.'  He explained that any person can conduct his or her own research, but it 
doesn't matter whether or not the author believes his or her hypothesis was proven. In the end, what the 
scientific community decides `upon seeing and reviewing the work' is what counts, he said." ("Experts 
question scientist's claim of reproducing Shroud of Turin," Catholic News Agency, October 6, 2009) 

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Created: 8 October, 2009. Updated: 23 March, 2010.

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