Stephen E. Jones

Shroud of Turin quotes: Unclassified quotes: March 2010

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The following are quotes added to my Shroud of Turin unclassified quotes in March 2010. See copyright conditions at end.

[Index: Jan, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep,Oct, Nov, Dec]


4/03/2010
"A Confessed Forger Bishop Pierre d'Arcis claimed that the shroud had been `cunningly painted,' a fact 
`attested by the artist who had painted it' ... Who was this artist? Like so many of his fellow craftsmen, his 
name remains unknown to us. We are aware that he flourished in the 1350s in north-central France, probably 
living in the diocese of Troyes -possibly even the city of Troyes itself-since he seems to have been quite 
accessible to the investigating bishop of Troyes." (Nickell, J., 2007, "Relics of the Christ," The University 
Press of Kentucky: Lexington KY, p.128-129. Emphasis original)

11/03/2010
"There are three possibilities as to the nature of the side strip: 1) it is a completely different piece of linen 
cloth which has been joined to one edge of the Shroud for some unknown purpose; 2) it is a piece of the 
original cloth of the Shroud which for some unknown reason became detached from the original and was 
then reattached by the seam; 3) it is cloth that is continuous with the rest of the Shroud and the seam is 
really a tuck or a tube that has been sewn into the cloth for some unknown purpose." (Adler, A.D., 1998, 
"Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin," in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned 
Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on the Shroud of Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 
2002, pp.87-91, p.87)

11/03/2010
"Schwalbe and Rogers [Schwalbe, L. & Rogers, R., "Physics and Chemistry of the Shroud of Turin; A 
Summary of the 1978 Investigation", Anal. Chim Acta, 135, 1982, pp. 3-49], mainly on the continuity 
of various macroscopically observable patterns seen in the weave in the radiograph images [Mottern, R., 
London, R. & Morris, R., "Radiographic Examination of the Shroud of Turin; A Preliminary Report", 
Materials Eval., 38, 1979, pp. 39-44] taken during the STURP investigations, rejected the possibility 
of an adventitious piece of cloth for the side strip and concluded that the two pieces of cloth were actually 
continuous through the seam." (Adler, A.D., 1998, " Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin," 
in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on the Shroud of 
Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, pp.87-88)

11/03/2010
"Of our three original possibilities, situation 1 is clearly rejected and situation 2 also seems highly unlikely in 
view of the detailed thread matching that would be required and the absence of any evidence of any frayed 
thread ends along either side of the seam image. Therefore we conclude that the side strip is actually 
continuous with the rest of the Shroud." (Adler, A.D., 1998, "," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, p.88)

11/03/2010
"The seam image ... also seems to show some sinusoidal pattern in the seam. However, the resolution is not 
good enough to determine whether this is a stitch forming the tube or represents an enclosed twisted cord 
in this seam as has been suggested by some authors." (Adler, A.D., 1998, "Concerning the Side Strip on the 
Shroud of Turin," in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned Manuscript: A Gathering of 
Publications on the Shroud of Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, pp.88-89)

11/03/2010
"A recent investigation [Adler, A., "Updating Recent Studies on the Shroud of Turin," Orna, M.V., ed., 
ACS Symp. Series, 625, 1996, pp. 223-228] comparing STURP sticky tape sample fibers with those of 
the radiocarbon sample by Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectrophotometry and also Scanning Electron 
Microprobe Spectroscopy demonstrated a clear difference in the chemical composition of the radiocarbon 
fibers from those of the various types of Shroud fibers. (Note that this calls into question the accuracy of 
the radiocarbon date.) ... it can be seen that the radiocarbon fibers, although they are from a waterstain area, 
are `saltier' than the waterstain image fibers from the rest of the cloth. Since the edges of the waterstains on 
the body of the cloth are unbounded permitting free diffusion, this implies that missing panels were already 
missing at the time of the 1532 fire, as such a bounded edge would concentrate diffusing dissolved salts at 
such an edge. Therefore, we conclude that the creation of the side strip itself also predates the time of the 
repairs following the 1532 fire." (Adler, A.D., 1998, "Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin," 
in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on the Shroud of 
Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, pp.88-89)

11/03/2010
"This same study [Adler, A., "Updating Recent Studies on the Shroud of Turin," Orna, M.V., ed., 
ACS Symp. Series, 625, 1996, pp. 223-228] provided new evidence confirming previously reported 
conclusions [Schwalbe, L. & Rogers, R., "Physics and Chemistry of the Shroud of Turin; A Summary of the 
1978 Investigation", Anal. Chim Acta, 135, 1982, pp. 3-49; Heller, J. & Adler, A., "A Chemical 
Investigation of the Shroud of Turin," Can. Soc. Forms. Sci. J., 14:3, 1981, pp. 81- 103; Jumper, 
E., et al., "A Comprehensive Examination of the Various Stains and Images on the Shroud of Turin," 
ACS Adv. Chem., 205, 1984, pp.447-476] that the Shroud is not a painted image and that the blood 
images represent blood derived materials." (Adler, A.D., 1998, "Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of 
Turin," in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on 
the Shroud of Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, pp.89-90)

11/03/2010
"It was also shown that the congruence of the dorsal head wound images on the Shroud with 
corresponding images on the Cloth of Oviedo provide strong evidence that the radiocarbon date is not just 
possibly inaccurate, as suggested by the chemical composition data, but is actually inaccurate in view of the 
known historical age of the Sudarion. Baima Bollone [Baima Bollone, P., "Sindone o No," SEI:, Torino, 1990, 
pp.72-75] has also independently made this type of comparison between images on these two cloths." 
(Adler, A.D., 1998, "Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin," in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., 
ed., "The Orphaned Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on the Shroud of Turin," Effatą Editrice: 
Cantalupa, Italy, 2002, pp.87-91, p.90)

11/03/2010
"Several authors have suggested that the purpose of a corded side seam might be to facilitate hanging the 
cloth for exhibition. Certainly many paintings of such medieval exhibitions show the Shroud being displayed 
in such a manner with the cloth shown along its length and held or suspended along what would appear to 
be the side seam. It should be noted that this mode of display places maximum stress at the end points of 
suspension and tearing of the fabric would be expected to proceed from the ends inward along the seam. 
Some historical accounts record that certain noteworthies were given pieces of the Shroud. It would be 
logical to assume that such samples would be taken from such torn end panels, thus providing a simple 
explanation for the missing panel portions of the side strip. Perhaps the Charny family decided to repair such 
damages at the time of their display of the Shroud. Maybe the radiocarbon sample is simply rewoven 
material from the time of this repair. Had the recommended protocol for taking this sample been followed 
[Adler, A., "Updating Recent Studies on the Shroud of Turin," Orna, M.V., ed., ACS Symp. 
Series, 625, 1996, pp. 223-228], we would have an answer for these questions." (Adler, A.D., 1998, 
"Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin," in Adler, A.D. & Crispino, D., ed., "The Orphaned 
Manuscript: A Gathering of Publications on the Shroud of Turin," Effatą Editrice: Cantalupa, Italy, 
2002, pp.87-91, pp.90-91)

11/03/2010
"One final mystery element of the fabric is what appears to be a seam line three and a half inches from the 
Shroud's edge (as seen to the left of the frontal image when viewed face on), that runs the cloth's full length. 
It is from inside this seam line that the Shroud's two missing portions have been removed at its two ends, 
but what is as yet still far from clear is the exact function of the seam itself, if that is indeed what it is. Before 
the STURP examination of 1978 I had hypothesised that the three-and-a-half-inch-wide strip of cloth which 
the seam appears to join to the main body of the Shroud was a 'side-strip' added close to the time of its 
original manufacture, perhaps in order to balance the appearance of the image on the cloth, since only by its 
addition does the body image appear central. But then in 1978 X-radiographs made by the STURP team 
showed that the same weft-run could be traced through from the original Shroud into the side-strip, 
suggesting that the cloth had been made as a single piece, with the seam being just that, a seam. However, if 
that was the case, why on earth had anyone gone to all the trouble of very carefully cutting off a three-and-
a-half-inch strip, only then equally carefully to sew it back on again?" (Wilson, I., "The Blood and the 
Shroud: New Evidence that the World's Most Sacred Relic is Real," Simon & 
Schuster: New York NY, 1998, p.72)

11/03/2010
"Fortunately, French textile specialist Gabriel Vial threw some fresh light on this mystery. After carefully 
examining the make-up of the Shroud's individual warpways rows of threads, he concluded that the Shroud 
must originally have been woven wider than its present width, but then someone cut it lengthways, removed 
either one or three warpways rows and carefully sewed it up again. Vial has favoured three rows having 
been removed, since just one would (a) have been hardly worth the effort; and (b) extremely difficult to cut 
and sew up again as accurately as would appear to be the case. However, as has been suggested both by 
my wife (a practised needlewoman), and by the STURP X-radiograph technician Bill Mottern (and his wife), 
rather than any cutting of the fabric, what could have been responsible for the very same effect is just a 
simple tuck or flat-fell seam run the length of the Shroud, which any proper textile specialist ought one day 
to be able to confirm, if given the same access to the Shroud's underside accorded to Giovanni Riggi and the 
STURP team." (Wilson, I., "The Blood and the Shroud: New Evidence that the World's Most Sacred Relic is 
Real," Simon & Schuster: New York NY, 1998, p.73)

11/03/2010
"If the seam is some kind of tuck, the mystery, of course, is why it was made? Might it have been to 
centralise the image on the cloth? Or was it a purely decorative dev a purely decoratiice? Whatever the answer, and whether 
the Shroud be a cunning fake ong fake or a genuine gravecloth, we can only acknowledge that our understanding of 
some of its most basic details as a textile is still far from complete, despite five ostensibly intensive scientific 
and technical examinations, three of these involving textile specialists." (Wilson, I., "The Blood and the 
Shroud: New Evidence that the World's Most Sacred Relic is Real," Simon & Schuster: New York NY, 1998, 
p.73)

12/03/2010
"Dr. Flury-Lemberg and New Textile Findings The first speaker was Dr. Mechthild Flury-Lemberg, a 
former curator of the Abegg Foundation textile museum, Switzerland, whose theme was 'The Shroud fabric, 
its technical and archaeological characteristics'. It was Dr. Flury-Lemberg who, immediately prior to the 1998 
exposition, had the task of preparing the Shroud for its display and housing in the new three ton Italgas 
container constructed for it, working side by side with Sister Maria Clara Antonini of the Poor Clares. 
Because the plate for the new container had been made slightly too small, Dr. Flury-Lemberg gained 
permission to remove the blue surround that had been sewed on in the 19th century. The intention behind 
this surround had been to save the Shroud from the repeated handling at the edges to which they had been 
subjected throughout the long centuries when it was the custom to hold it up before the populace. 
However, the surround had ever since prevented examination of the same edges, thereby hindering totally 
accurate calculation of its dimensions. Now the dimensions have been authoritatively determined by Dr. 
Flury-Lemberg as 437 cm long by 111 cm wide." (Wilson, I., "`The Turin Shroud - past, present and future', 
Turin, 2-5 March, 2000 - probably the best-ever Shroud Symposium," British Society for the Turin Shroud 
Newsletter, No. 51, June 2000. Emphasis original) 

12/03/2010
"By far the most important information to come from Dr. Flury-Lemberg, however, concerns how the Shroud 
had been woven and finished. As she pointed out, looms in antiquity, particularly those in Egypt, could be 
up to 3.5 metres wide, enabling them to turn out continuous lengths of cloth far longer and wider than the 
Shroud. The high quality of the Shroud's weaving strongly suggests it to have been made on a 
'professional' loom of this kind. The explanation of its side-strip would therefore seem to be that at the time 
of its manufacture it formed part of considerably wider cloth which was then cut lengthwise into at least 
three pieces, two wide, and one narrow, this latter being the side-strip, which retains selvedge along its 
length, just as does its opposite number. With the central section removed (and now lost without trace), the 
wide and narrow pieces were very expertly joined up to form the Shroud as we know it today, this thereby 
clearly having been made to conform to specific dimensions." (Wilson, I., "`The Turin Shroud - past, 
present and future', Turin, 2-5 March, 2000 - probably the best-ever Shroud Symposium," British Society for 
the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 51, June 2000) 

12/03/2010
"But even more importantly, Dr. Flury-Lemberg found the cloth's finishing, at its hems, and in the joining 
seam to have been done using an unusual type of stitching very nearly invisible on one side, and as such 
closely resembling that of ancient Jewish textiles as found at Masada, the Jewish palace-fortress that was 
overthrown by the Romans in AD 73, never to be occupied again. This alone, therefore, constitutes 
powerful evidence against the carbon dating result of 1988. As Dr. Flury-Lemberg told the Sunday Times 
'In my opinion the Shroud is not a mediaeval fake. The parallels I have found indicate that it could have 
existed at the same time as Jesus Christ and in what is now Israel.'" (Wilson, I., "`The Turin Shroud - past, 
present and future', Turin, 2-5 March, 2000 - probably the best-ever Shroud Symposium," British Society for 
the Turin Shroud Newsletter, No. 51, June 2000) 

12/03/2010
"First, we examined the so-called side strip and its seam, about which there have been
questions and disagreement. In 1982 after studying the radiographs taken in 1978, Schwalbe and
Rogers reported that there is continuity of the threads from the Shroud into the side strip and
concluded that the Shroud and the side strip are of one piece. (Ref.: Schwalbe & Rogers, 1982)
We studied the same area also, trying to discern whether the side strip is 1) a completely
different piece of linen which had been joined to the edge of the Shroud, 2) a piece of the
original Shroud which had been detached but was then carefully reattached by the seam, or 3) an
integral, continuous part of the Shroud fabric with the seam being really a tuck in the cloth for
some reason. A joint paper, `Concerning the Side Strip on the Shroud of Turin,' (Ref.: Adler et al,
1997) was presented at the May 1997 Nice Symposium in which we reported our findings from
tracing several thousand of some 15,000 weft threads from thefrom the body of the Shroud through the
seam and into the side strip that there is near-perfect alignment of nearly each thread in position,
thickness, and intensity. Also, we found no evidence of frayed thread ends either in the seam or
along either side of it. Our conclusion then was that the side strip is continuous with the rest of
the Shroud." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., "Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin," 
Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, p.1)

12/03/2010
"In March 2000, Flury-Lemberg presented a paper, `The Linen of the Turin Shroud,' (Ref.: Flury-Lemberg, 
2000) dealing with technical and archaeological characteristics of the fabric. She had worked directly with 
the Shroud as a fabric specialist. She felt that originally the fabric had been cut into three lengthwise strips, 
two wide and one narrow, and that later the narrow strip (now the side strip) was expertly reattached to one 
of the wide strips by the seam to produce what we now know as the Shroud. Later, we reexamined the 
radiographs as well as photographic enlargements of portions of them to get a better understanding of the 
side strip and the two missing corners (MC) at the frontal and dorsal ends on the anatomic left side of the 
Shroud. ... Following the seam its full length on the Shroud, it is remarkably uniform for almost the entire 
length except for the two ends near the MC. The weft threads can be traced from the Shroud through the 
seam continuing into the side strip in near perfect alignment. The seam appears to be a simple tuck (a 
portion of the cloth folded over on itself) in the Shroud fabric, which is meticulously hand-sewed in place on 
both sides of the tuck." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., "Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the 
Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, p.2)

12/03/2010
"On the basis of these observations, we would make several speculations. We think that the two corners 
(the MC areas) were already damaged and possibly partially missing before the seam was put in. They may 
have been removed at the time the seam was put in as part of the process of repairing and strengthening the 
Shroud, and to make the areas neater (as well as to provide a source of relics). We suspect that the corners 
were damaged during ostensions (public displays) when the Shroud was always held up by the same edge, 
thus putting stress on the same side and especially on the corners. The fabric immediately adjacent to the 
two MC areas likely was damaged or weakened also, and so meticulous repair and reweaving of these areas 
may have been done to restore the general appearance and to prevent further damage. Our observations of 
the radiographs indicate that possible repairs or reweaving (other than the stitches and patches around the 
scorched and burned areas) were essentially limited to these two corner areas next to the sites of the MCs. 
We speculate that the fabric repair and the creation of the seam were done at the same time, after which the 
Holland backing cloth was attached." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., "Excerpt from Radiological Aspects 
of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, p.3)

12/03/2010
"The second focus of our examinations was the area from which the specimen was taken for the C14 
radiocarbon dating in 1988. Our attention was directed to this area when the C14 test results dating the 
Shroud to AD 1260-1390 were announced in October, 1988. The original article, `Radiocarbon Dating of the 
Shroud of Turin,' published in Nature and referring to the sample used for dating stated that `the strip 
came from a single site on the main body of 4 the Shroud away from any patch or burned areas' and the test 
provided `conclusive evidence that the linen of the Shroud of Turin is medieval.' (Ref.: Damon et al, 1989) 
We knew the announced date was incorrect because we had previously dated the Shroud to AD 30 by the 
presence of two identifiable Jewish coins over the eyes both dating to AD 29 and by the abrupt appearance 
of art works influenced by the Shroud in AD 31. In addition, the presence on the Shroud of images of 
multiple flowers substantially supported by identifiable pollen grains also from the Shroud of spring-
blooming plants, all of which grow in Israel, indicated the place of origin to be the Near East and not Europe. 
(Ref.: Danin et al, 1999) Wondering how such an erroneous dating could have happened, we obtained a 
copy of the videotape of the taking of the single specimen. On examining the videotape in detail frame by 
frame, we noted that the sample contained the seam and that, as the sample was pulled taut and cut, there 
were many weft threads that stood out very prominently from the seam extending across the sample used for 
the radiocarbon dating and into the Shroud fabric as far as 1½ inches (3.5 cm). These threads appeared to be 
very stiff, and it occurred to us immediately that this area had been rewoven, repaired, or reinforced. We 
unofficially presented this finding and our interpretation of it at the Shroud Conference in Paris in 1989. We 
published these findings in 1998. (Ref.: Whanger & Whanger, 1998)." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., 
"Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, 
Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, pp.3-4)

12/03/2010
"There has been great controversy and difference of opinions and observations. For instance, Jackson, 
Propp and Fornof in 1999 stated that viewing the C14 sample area on transmitted light photographs 
disproved the hypothesis that the Shroud was rewoven in that area, or that on other observations there 
were no `alien threads intruding into the radiocarbon sample.' (Ref.: Jackson et al, 2000) Again, after 
examining the Shroud during the conservation activities of 2002, Flury-Lemberg reported in Sindone 2002 
(Ref.: Flury-Lemberg, 2003) that concerning the hypothetical reweaving of the 16th century, `there is no 
doubt that the Shroud does not contain any reweaving.' From the opposite viewpoint, Marino and Benford 
reported in a paper in 2000, `Evidence for the Skewing of the C14 Dating of the Shroud of Turin Due to 
Repairs,' (Ref.: Marino & Benson, 2000) that there is definite evidence for repairs to the fabric at the area of 
the C14 sample. Most recent, the paper by the late Dr. Ray Rogers on `Studies on the radiocarbon sample 
from the Shroud of Turin' (Ref.: Rogers, 2005) showed aberrant coated threads in the C14 specimen. This 
was confirmed by the report by Brown, `Microscopical Investigation of Selected Raes Threads from the 
Shroud of Turin,' that light and SEM microscopy showed the presence of dye-coated fibers and spliced 
threads in the sample, indicating late addition material. (Ref.: Brown, 2005)" (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., 
"Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, 
Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, pp.3-4)

12/03/2010
"To help clarify this issue, we examined in detail the area of the C14 specimen on the radiographs. An 
irregular band of threads with increased radiodensity and extending variably about 5/8 inch (1.7 cm) into the 
Shroud fabric is noted immediately adjacent to much of the length of the seam that borders the frontal MC. 
In a close-up view of the area where the Raes sample and the single C14 sample were taken, irregularities in 
some of the weave pattern can be noted on the Shroud fabric adjacent to the seam. There is significant 
variability in the radiodensity of both warp and weft threads in this area. Some of the threads angulate, and 
the continuity of a few seems to be broken. This area is denser and the 3:1 herringbone weave pattern is 
much less obvious than in the nearby body of the Shroud fabric. Our conclusion is that the radiographs are 
strongly suggestive of significant alterations in the threads and weave of the Shroud fabric in the area from 
which the C14 specimen was taken, thus casting major doubts on the validity of the radiocarbon dating." 
(Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., "Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for 
Study of the Shroud of Turin, Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, pp.4-5)

12/03/2010
"A very interesting finding is that a single weft thread has been extracted at about the midway level of 
where the Raes sample was removed, beginning about 1 cm medial to the rolled seam that reattached the 
Shroud to the backing cloth. The space of the missing thread appears to be about 8 cm in length. We do not 
know the history of this particular thread, but Dr. Alan Adler had a thread about 8 cm in length that came 
from the Shroud that he acquired in the early 1980s from an unidentified source. He detected what he 
referred to as starch on one end of this thread. He then had a very unofficial and admittedly inadequate 
radiocarbon dating done on each end of this thread in 1983. Reportedly, the starched end tested about AD 
1000 and the other end of the same thread tested about AD 200. At a minimum, this would indicate that 
carbon dating the Shroud might be very technically problematic. Assuming that the thread that Dr. Adler 
had might have been the one that had been extracted at this site, we may have a highly significant, even if 
inadequate, finding, since the lateral 1 to 2 cm of this thread would have been in the continuation of the area 
from which the 1988 specimen was extracted. If this scenario is correct, we may not only have evidence that 
the 1988 sample-extraction-area is abnormal, but we may also have a much more accurate dating of the body 
of the Shroud, namely, in the range of AD 200." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, M., "Excerpt from 
Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, Durham NC, 2005, 
pp.1-15, p.5)

12/03/2010
"Conclusions On studying the radiographs of the Shroud made in 1978, details of the seams and threads 
can be seen. It appears that the side seam was put in as a tuck, and that near the two missing corners there 
are variations in weave patterns and in thread densities which suggest that these two areas had been 
damaged and then repaired in some way. Examination of the site of the C14 single sample indicates that at 
least part of the sample was taken from one of these repaired or altered areas." (Whanger, A.D. & Whanger, 
M., "Excerpt from Radiological Aspects of the Shroud of Turin, "Council for Study of the Shroud of Turin, 
Durham NC, 2005, pp.1-15, p.5) 

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